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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic
To know "The Searchers" is to love it. Or is it? Directed by the venerable John Ford and starring John Wayne at his strongest and strangest, this, the most celebrated of Westerns (opening on Wednesday for a nine-day revival at Laemmle's Monica in Santa Monica), was not exactly fawned over when it first appeared.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1993 | JANE STERN and MICHAEL STERNBD Jane and Michael Stern are the authors of "Way Out West," a celebration of the American West just published by HarperCollins.
America's Western hero is one tough hombre. Pronounced dead by critics on a number of occasions, he always manages to dust himself off and get back in the saddle again.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2011 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
Robert Mitchum westerns? The quintessential film noir actor, whose distinctly urban air of seductive menace galvanized films such as "Out of the Past," riding hell bent for leather on some galloping steed? There must be some mistake. Of course, as all Mitchum fans know -- and as the new UCLA Film & Television Archive series "Tracking the Cat: Robert Mitchum in the West" starting at the Hammer Museum on Friday proves -- the actor had extensive western experience. So much so that, as he once famously told an interviewer, "I have two kinds of acting: one on a horse, one off a horse.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2010 | By Gina McIntyre, Los Angeles TImes
It's not every day an English actor gets the chance to play a cowboy ? just ask Andrew Lincoln. The star of AMC's new original series, "The Walking Dead," says that when he was first offered the role of Rick Grimes, a small-town sheriff who survives the zombie apocalypse and struggles to stay alive in a world decimated by the flesh-eating undead, the opportunity to saddle up and channel his inner Gary Cooper proved too tempting to resist. "I went to work, and I put on cowboy boots, a Stetson, a bag of guns, and got on a horse called Blade and rode into an apocalyptic Atlanta," Lincoln said recently during a telephone interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, Michael Wilmington is a frequent contributor to Calendar
"They're all gone now except for me and Sammy Fuller," Budd Boetticher says quietly. The last roundup, perhaps? Oscar (Budd) Boetticher Jr. is talking about the major directors of the Hollywood Western's Golden Age. And the colleagues he's recalling--the Howard Hawkses, Raoul Walshes, Anthony Manns, Don Siegels and William Wellmans-- are mostly gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2002 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Don't tell the folks at Turner Classic Movies that the western is dead. The all-movie channel has lassoed the most comprehensive collection of movie westerns ever made for its "The Every Great Western (Except 'Shane') Film Festival" that begins Saturday with an all-day tribute to John Wayne. About that series title, TCM vice president of program production Tom Brown says the cable outlet decided to be upfront.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1993 | DAVID WALSTAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just as Kevin Costner, Kurt Russell, Madeleine Stowe, Robert Duvall, Richard Dean Anderson and others are saddling up with various Westerns as part of a resurgence in the genre, one of Hollywood's legendary Western streets is biting the dust. By the end of today, Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Television has been around so long now ? more than 60 years in the commercial form we know today ? that to many of its viewers its origins are lost in the swirling mists of time, available to those who seek it out on video, but increasingly less a presence in the rota of reruns. "Pioneers of Television," a four-part series that begins Tuesday on KOCE, falls somewhere between archaeology and nostalgia. This is a second installment: Four earlier hours (on sitcoms, game shows, variety shows and talk shows)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2003 | Michael F. Blake, Special to The Times
The plot of a lone rider helping a group of homesteaders to stand up to a greedy cattle baron has been material for numerous western novels and films over the decades. This story line can be found in the novels of Zane Grey and Louis L'Amour as well as many B-western films. It can also be found in the history of the American West, notably the Johnson County War. But perhaps the greatest use of this threadbare plot was in the classic western released 50 years ago today: "Shane."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite being publicity-shy, Sam Shepard is remarkably friendly and funny over the phone from New York City. Shepard, the prolific American playwright, actor and director, is breaking his usual silence to discuss his latest film, "Purgatory," a new western adventure premiering Sunday on TNT. The lanky, laconic Shepard seems perfectly cast in the quirky sagebrush saga as Mr. Forest, an honorable sheriff of a mysterious little town.
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