Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWesterns
IN THE NEWS

Westerns

ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2011 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
Robert Mitchum westerns? The quintessential film noir actor, whose distinctly urban air of seductive menace galvanized films such as "Out of the Past," riding hell bent for leather on some galloping steed? There must be some mistake. Of course, as all Mitchum fans know -- and as the new UCLA Film & Television Archive series "Tracking the Cat: Robert Mitchum in the West" starting at the Hammer Museum on Friday proves -- the actor had extensive western experience. So much so that, as he once famously told an interviewer, "I have two kinds of acting: one on a horse, one off a horse.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1995 | Cecilia Rasmussen
If Al Jennings had been as tall as his tales, he might have become one of Hollywood's early leading men, instead of a technical adviser and character actor who helped shape one of the film industry's most enduring genres--the Western. Unfortunately, the gun-packing man who was variously an evangelist, outlaw, lawyer, author, actor and politician before becoming one of the San Fernando Valley's most colorful characters stood a scant five feet in height, even with his boots on.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic
To know "The Searchers" is to love it. Or is it? Directed by the venerable John Ford and starring John Wayne at his strongest and strangest, this, the most celebrated of Westerns (opening on Wednesday for a nine-day revival at Laemmle's Monica in Santa Monica), was not exactly fawned over when it first appeared.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1993 | JANE STERN and MICHAEL STERNBD Jane and Michael Stern are the authors of "Way Out West," a celebration of the American West just published by HarperCollins.
America's Western hero is one tough hombre. Pronounced dead by critics on a number of occasions, he always manages to dust himself off and get back in the saddle again.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, Michael Wilmington is a frequent contributor to Calendar
"They're all gone now except for me and Sammy Fuller," Budd Boetticher says quietly. The last roundup, perhaps? Oscar (Budd) Boetticher Jr. is talking about the major directors of the Hollywood Western's Golden Age. And the colleagues he's recalling--the Howard Hawkses, Raoul Walshes, Anthony Manns, Don Siegels and William Wellmans-- are mostly gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012 | Sari Heifetz-Stricke
The best way to find a good guy in the westerns of director Sergio Leone is to look for a worse guy. The Italian director's penchant for blurring the lines between heroes and villains stood in stark contrast with the clear distinctions found in traditional Hollywood westerns and helped modernize and revitalize the genre, two facts readily apparent in "Once Upon a Time: The Films of Sergio Leone" at the American Cinematheque beginning Friday....
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2002 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Don't tell the folks at Turner Classic Movies that the western is dead. The all-movie channel has lassoed the most comprehensive collection of movie westerns ever made for its "The Every Great Western (Except 'Shane') Film Festival" that begins Saturday with an all-day tribute to John Wayne. About that series title, TCM vice president of program production Tom Brown says the cable outlet decided to be upfront.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1994 | ALLEN BARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Christmas, the movie industry gave the public films about AIDS, concentration camps, escaped convicts and men sentenced to life imprisonment. The public--or a sizable portion of it, anyway--decided it wanted a Western, and "Tombstone," the surprise hit of the winter, was launched. At the time of its Christmas Day release, the chances for "Tombstone," the latest version of the escapades of Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday, seemed about as good as the Clantons at the O.K. Corral.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2010 | By Gina McIntyre, Los Angeles TImes
It's not every day an English actor gets the chance to play a cowboy ? just ask Andrew Lincoln. The star of AMC's new original series, "The Walking Dead," says that when he was first offered the role of Rick Grimes, a small-town sheriff who survives the zombie apocalypse and struggles to stay alive in a world decimated by the flesh-eating undead, the opportunity to saddle up and channel his inner Gary Cooper proved too tempting to resist. "I went to work, and I put on cowboy boots, a Stetson, a bag of guns, and got on a horse called Blade and rode into an apocalyptic Atlanta," Lincoln said recently during a telephone interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1993 | DAVID WALSTAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just as Kevin Costner, Kurt Russell, Madeleine Stowe, Robert Duvall, Richard Dean Anderson and others are saddling up with various Westerns as part of a resurgence in the genre, one of Hollywood's legendary Western streets is biting the dust. By the end of today, Warner Bros.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|