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FOOD
January 30, 2008
Total time: Several days Servings: Makes 1 starter Note: Adapted from a recipe in Peter Reinhart's "Whole Grain Breads" Phase 1 (Day 1) sponge 3 1/2 tablespoons (1 ounce) whole wheat flour 1/4 cup (2 ounces) unsweetened pineapple juice In a small nonreactive bowl, stir together the flour and juice with a spoon or whisk to make a paste (the liquid can be cold or at room temperature -- it doesn't matter). It should be like pancake batter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
March 1, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
The gluten-free crowd has spoken, and it wants pizza. It's not hard to find gluten-free crusts these days, usually for a surcharge. What's more elusive is a pizza that's suitable for those with celiac disease - people for whom just a dusting of ambient wheat flour can mean painful illness. As Jennifer Harvey, food specialist for MOD Pizza put it: "The gluten-free movement has gotten so big. It's no longer a niche. " 800 Degrees Neapolitan Pizzeria: Originally sold a few gluten-free crusts a day, now it's 5% of the business.
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NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By Karin Klein
There's a dearth of evidence that genetically engineered food is dangerous to human health - but that doesn't mean consumers are wrong to have concerns about its effect on the environment and on non-bioengineered crops. U.S. agribusiness has rushed to embrace the GMO (for genetically modified organism, though genetically engineered is a more accurate term) possibilities, with almost all of our corn, soy and canola now featuring genes that have been tinkered with, usually to make them resistant to certain herbicides.
NEWS
December 22, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
People who avoid gluten will say they're grateful for the dozens of new products that have enabled them to eat bread, cookies, snack bars and other baked goods. They'll also sometimes say that many of those products are not very good, and contain ingredients they'd rather not eat. Enter the upper echelons of bakers, people like Valerie Gordon, who has been experimenting with gluten-free cakes and cookies for her Valerie shops and cafes in Los Angeles. She has a variety of gluten-free baked goods these days: blue corn muffins, chocolate cake, brownies, chocolate chips cookies and a snack mix. And more is on the drawing board.
SCIENCE
November 29, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
Another day, another genome -- that's how easy large-scale DNA sequencing has gotten these days. Following fast on the tracks of the domestic Duroc pig and the watermelon , bread wheat, Triticum aestivum ,  now has its genetic code laid bare.  It was a tough job --  because the ancient events that gave rise to wheat involved three separate hybridization events between close grassy relatives, resulting in a hulking, bloated genome....
FOOD
March 11, 2010
Whole wheat spaghetti with green garlic and fried egg Total time: 25 minutes Servings: 4 Note: Green garlic is available seasonally from farmers markets and select well-stocked supermarkets. 1/2 pound whole wheat spaghetti 8 stalks green garlic, halved lengthwise, washed, dried and sliced thinly lengthwise 6 tablespoons olive oil, divided 4 eggs, at room temperature Coarsely grated black pepper Sea salt 1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and cook the spaghetti until just al dente, about 9 minutes, or according to the instructions on the package.
FOOD
March 28, 1999 | CHARLES PERRY
Farik or farikeh is wheat harvested when the stalks are still green and then toasted to dry it and remove the chaff. (In Arabic, the name refers to the stage of ripeness when the grain is just ready to have its husk removed.) Fresh farik may still contain enough moisture to spoil and should not be stored in an airtight container at first. "The preparation of farik is still done by the farmers themselves," says Clifford Wright.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2001
Re "Opium Poppies Take Root Once Again in Afghanistan," Nov. 23: An Afghan farmer gets front-page coverage about his zeal to return to the farming of opium to be sold to the world. His reason for doing this is the time-honored and well-worn excuse most criminals use these days: "The only reason we are doing this is because we are poor." Boy, never heard that one before. But in a previous paragraph, he states, "I can make 10 times more with poppy than I can with wheat." Let's see here, grow wheat in order to make a decent living and help to feed the world, or grow a plant that will create an illegal narcotic known to devastate the lives of countless people around the world.
NEWS
May 16, 1985 | Associated Press
Agriculture Secretary John R. Block said Wednesday that the United States will give away $2 billion worth of government-owned surplus corn and wheat to stimulate overseas sales of American farm products. "We will be going on the attack in the international marketplace," Block told a news conference, adding that the export subsidies will be targeted to recapture markets taken from U.S. farmers by the subsidies of other nations. Sen. Edward Zorinsky (D-Neb.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Winter Wheat Crop Forecast Cut: The government has slashed its winter wheat crop forecast 12% to a 20-year low of 8.3 million metric tons because of the prolonged drought. That was down from a September forecast of 9.4 million tons. Australia was the world's fourth-largest wheat producer last year, with a harvest of 17.9 million tons.
OPINION
August 30, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
A few years ago, Kellogg Co. embarked on an ad campaign to convince parents that eating Frosted Mini-Wheats cereal would make star students of their children, with higher levels of attention and memory. "Clinical studies" - a revered term - showed that a breakfast of the cereal improved children's attentiveness by "nearly 20%," the ads said. There are studies, and then there are studies. This one, sponsored by Kellogg itself, compared children who ate its cereal with those who ate no breakfast at all. So it was misleading to the extent that it suggested that Frosted Mini-Wheats were better at improving attention than any other sort of breakfast.
FOOD
August 3, 2013
There may be no better illustration of how Semsa Denizsel  works than her sourdough bread, which is some of the best in Istanbul. It came about almost by accident. One day on a whim, she decided to make some bread, just like that. "I've never been a baker; I've always been a cook. I don't have the patience," she says. But somehow she found herself obsessed. She set up a notebook and tried something different every day, taking notes in an uncharacteristically precise way. She researched flours from all over and eventually settled on an Anatolian heirloom wheat whose origins are more than 8,000 years old. Denizsel finally got it right after attending a workshop in Rome given by master pizza chef Gabriele Bonci.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Isabella Alsobrook
About a week before I started my “experiment,” as I have fondly dubbed my monthlong locavore diet, I began researching where I could buy wheat and other grains. As carbs are my favorite food group, it was of utmost importance that I manage to get my bread fix during June. Because it seemed impossible to find a wheat farm within my 100-mile radius, I settled for the idea of requiring that my flour be milled within my parameters, but not necessarily grown there. My mother recalled that there was a mill in Los Angeles, El Molino Viejo , that ground local wheat, but, a quick Google search later, I discovered that it no longer runs.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By Karin Klein
There's a dearth of evidence that genetically engineered food is dangerous to human health - but that doesn't mean consumers are wrong to have concerns about its effect on the environment and on non-bioengineered crops. U.S. agribusiness has rushed to embrace the GMO (for genetically modified organism, though genetically engineered is a more accurate term) possibilities, with almost all of our corn, soy and canola now featuring genes that have been tinkered with, usually to make them resistant to certain herbicides.
SPORTS
May 25, 2013 | Bill Plaschke
Zack Wheat is remembered frequently in a town in the middle of Missouri, his great-grandson often pulling out a Bull Durham cigar pin bearing the likeness of the most prolific hitter in Dodgers franchise history. "He was such a kind man, such a great man, and he always considered the Dodgers his family," Zack Alan Wheat said. Dazzy Vance is remembered frequently in a town in west central Florida, a photo of him standing in Ebbets Field hanging proudly in the middle of his grandson's living room.
FOOD
May 23, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Health experts estimate that as many as a third of us have some level of intolerance to gluten -- a protein found mostly in wheat. And gluten shows up in more than bread and cake -- foods you might not guess, such as sauces and herb mixes. On Thursday, at 11 a.m. Pacific time , we'll talk with Kristine Kidd, who has been gluten free for years and has written a cookbook called "Weeknight Gluten-Free. " She spent two decades as an editor at Bon Appetit magazine. We hope you will join us live, or if you can't, please listen to the archived conversation.
OPINION
March 21, 2008
Re "Our daily bread? It costs more," March 16 This article documents the effect rising wheat prices have had on bakers. It is important to note that as recently as 2002, wheat farmers were receiving less than $3 per bushel, lower than 1970s prices. These depressed prices drove thousands of family farmers out of business while food processors' and agribusinesses' profits skyrocketed. Just as some bakers have little market power to control the price of wheat, farmers have little control over the price they receive for their commodities.
FOOD
May 18, 2013 | Charles Perry
Redlands' Hangar 24 makes some interesting beers with dates, wine grapes and other fruits. This one, with its sunny orange personality, seems particularly right for spring. It starts out as a German-style weizen, so you might be able to detect faint notes of clove and banana, but orange predominates. The flavor comes not from orange peel alone, which is a common enough addition to wheat beers, but from whole pureed oranges, complete with the rind and pulp, added at several times in the brewing process.
FOOD
May 11, 2013 | By Faye Levy
When I lived in the Middle East, I learned that tender tabbouleh salad and crunchy fried kibbeh , the celebrated Levantine croquette, share a key ingredient: bulgur. Since ancient times, bulgur has been a staple in the Fertile Crescent, where it is popular today as pilaf and is used in a variety of other dishes, including stuffed vegetables, lentil entrees, meat stews and stuffings for poultry. In fact, the word "bulgur" comes from Turkish, and southeastern Turkey may be the area where wheat was first cultivated.
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