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BUSINESS
January 24, 2013 | David Undercoffler
In the late 1940s, Enzo Ferrari reluctantly agreed to build road cars as a way to finance his racing outfit. One has to wonder, though, whether he would have signed his name to today's Ferrari FF, a four-seat, all-wheel-drive hatchback intended to broaden the brand and boost global sales. Designed to lure a new kind of customer, the FF comfortably totes four passengers and their luggage without worrying mortal drivers about landing wheels up in a ditch. Ferrari calls the body a shooting-brake design, which probably plays better than "hatchback" on the lot in Beverly Hills.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2004 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
The childhood memory might go something like this: A cold Christmas morning. You take your first bicycle, shining with brand-spanking-newness, out for a solo spin. The air is silent as you whiz along hushed streets, the sound of dead leaves under your tires punctuating the quiet. And then it hits you: The world is yours. You can go anywhere you want. The intoxicating feel of utter freedom mixes with the first taste of speed and self-mobility to forge a moment you'll never forget.
HEALTH
January 17, 2014 | Roy Wallack, Gear
You'd think, after 125 years, that the simple bicycle wouldn't have many radical new ideas left. Well, the glacial pace of change on two wheels is a thing of the past. The 2014 models showcase at least four huge and practical changes: mountain-bike-style braking that has broken into road bikes, new and improved mountain-bike wheel sizes, built-in lighting for commuter bikes, and even extra water and tool-storage capacity for mountain bikes. It's just too bad you can't get them all on one bike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2011 | Sandy Banks
I felt a little out of place on Sunday as I unloaded my creaky beach cruiser from the trunk of my car and strapped on a helmet so new it still had the price tag attached. I hadn't ridden a bike in years; there was rust on my fenders and in my knees. But it didn't take more than a few wobbly blocks for me to realize that I fit in just fine with the thousands of bicyclists who turned out at Sunday's CicLAvia in downtown Los Angeles. There were plenty of pros in padded shorts on bikes that cost more than my first car. But there were also kids with training wheels, middle-aged couples on tandem bikes and plenty of folks whose labored breathing on modest inclines suggested that they hadn't been out in a while.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
The line of students who walk the few blocks from Western Avenue Elementary keeps getting longer. Only a year ago, it was just a handful who ventured once a week to the South Los Angeles Learning Center, an afterschool program for homeless children in a tiny strip mall. Now, it's more than a dozen, five days a week. On this afternoon, the kids are rowdy and restless. They chomp on chips and grapes, sip punch and chatter. The noise ricochets through the cramped classroom, but Charles Evans, the man who runs the place for School on Wheels, hones in on Jeanquis.
MAGAZINE
September 23, 2001
My 10-year-old daughter was touched by your article about School on Wheels ("School on Wheels: Bringing Education to Homeless Kids," Metropolis, by James Ricci, Aug. 26). She would like to send some of her own money to help pay for the backpacks needed by students. Tracy Metzger Santa Monica Editor's Note School on Wheels can be reached at P.O. Box 2283, Malibu, CA, 90265, or by calling (310) 589-2642.
MAGAZINE
February 17, 1991
Tim Cahill's "We Are Not Men, We Are Roto" (Jan. 6) was an absolute joy. It was reminiscent of author Peter Jenkins' book ("Walk Across America"), only with wheels. RUTH T. JOHNSON West Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1993
A bizarre street death here has been classified a suicide, the Orange County coroner's office said Saturday. A 29-year-old Vietnamese man killed himself Friday about 5:30 p.m. by deliberately diving under the wheels of a moving truck near Beach Boulevard and Terry Drive, according to police. The man's identity was not released pending notification of relatives. Officers said the man lived in Huntington Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1987
A woman killed Friday when she fell beneath the wheels of a Southern California Rapid Transit District bus outside Burbank Airport was identified Saturday as Roya Mahindoost, 31, of Van Nuys. Mahindoost was chasing the bus, pounding on the side of the vehicle to get the driver's attention, when she slipped beneath the wheels, officials said. The bus driver, whose name was not disclosed, told Burbank police he never saw the woman. Police said there was no evidence of wrongdoing by the driver.
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