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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2011 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Louis Borick, the founder and longtime chairman of Van Nuys-headquartered Superior Industries International, one of the world's largest manufacturers of aluminum wheels for the automotive industry, has died. He was 87. Borick died of natural causes Monday, two days before his 88th birthday, at his home in Beverly Hills, said his son, Steven. A onetime used-car salesman who sold his half of a business that made clear plastic seat covers in St. Paul, Minn., before moving to Encino in 1956, Borick founded Superior Industries in a 4,000-square-foot plant in North Hollywood a year later.
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WORLD
January 8, 2012 | By Barbara Demick
Even the police are driving Porsches. Chinese officials love their cars - big, fancy, expensive cars. A chocolate-colored Bentley worth $560,000 is cruising the streets of Beijing with license plates indicating it is registered to Zhongnanhai, the Communist Party headquarters. The armed police, who handle riots and crowd control, have the same model of Bentley in blue. And just in case it needs to go racing off to war, the Chinese army has a black Maserati that sells in China for $330,000.
HEALTH
January 17, 2014 | Roy Wallack, Gear
You'd think, after 125 years, that the simple bicycle wouldn't have many radical new ideas left. Well, the glacial pace of change on two wheels is a thing of the past. The 2014 models showcase at least four huge and practical changes: mountain-bike-style braking that has broken into road bikes, new and improved mountain-bike wheel sizes, built-in lighting for commuter bikes, and even extra water and tool-storage capacity for mountain bikes. It's just too bad you can't get them all on one bike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2011 | Sandy Banks
I felt a little out of place on Sunday as I unloaded my creaky beach cruiser from the trunk of my car and strapped on a helmet so new it still had the price tag attached. I hadn't ridden a bike in years; there was rust on my fenders and in my knees. But it didn't take more than a few wobbly blocks for me to realize that I fit in just fine with the thousands of bicyclists who turned out at Sunday's CicLAvia in downtown Los Angeles. There were plenty of pros in padded shorts on bikes that cost more than my first car. But there were also kids with training wheels, middle-aged couples on tandem bikes and plenty of folks whose labored breathing on modest inclines suggested that they hadn't been out in a while.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
The line of students who walk the few blocks from Western Avenue Elementary keeps getting longer. Only a year ago, it was just a handful who ventured once a week to the South Los Angeles Learning Center, an afterschool program for homeless children in a tiny strip mall. Now, it's more than a dozen, five days a week. On this afternoon, the kids are rowdy and restless. They chomp on chips and grapes, sip punch and chatter. The noise ricochets through the cramped classroom, but Charles Evans, the man who runs the place for School on Wheels, hones in on Jeanquis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Paul Soldner, a ceramicist and longtime Scripps College teacher who introduced a pottery technique called American raku, died Monday at his home in Claremont after a period of declining health. He was 89. "He was one of the greats in California ceramics ? part of the West Coast scene that came on in the '60s with Peter Voulkos, John Mason and Ken Price," said Doug Casebeer, an artistic director at the Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass Village, Colo., which Soldner helped to found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2013 | By Martha Groves
World on Wheels, the last full-fledged indoor roller skating rink in the city of Los Angeles, will hold its final lace-up Sunday night. For three decades, the Mid-City institution has won loyalists as an indoor amusement park, party venue, fitness center, haven for young people and hip-hop incubator. It has even played matchmaker. But a bankruptcy proceeding, a change in ownership and evolving neighborhood tastes have conspired to end its free-wheeling days. "It's like losing a member of the family," said Nelson Bracamonte, 55, a weekly regular at the rink since its opening on Halloween 1981.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2012 | By David Undercoffler, Auto Critic, Los Angeles Times
The car: 2013 Nissan GT-R The power: 545 horsepower and 463 pound-feet of torque coming from a twin-turbocharged, 3.8-liter V-6 engine mated to a six-speed, dual-clutch transmission with magnesium paddle shifters. The photos: 2013 Nissan GT-R The speed: 0-60 in a startling three seconds. Some tests have shown that number as low as 2.7 seconds. The bragging rights: If being one of the world's fastest production cars to do 0-60 isn't enough, maybe try world's cheapest supercar.
HEALTH
October 11, 2013 | Roy Wallack, Gear
The folding bike is riding the cycling commuter wave, and the clever engineering is making it quicker than ever to carry on a subway or in a car trunk. Now found in some regular bike shops as well as specialty urban-transportation stores, better designs are helping the bikes shrug off a nerdy-professor stereotype of being ugly, tiny-wheeled, poor-riding machines. Breakthrough models come with chainless belt drives, electric engines and even recumbent formats. Most sport 20-inch wheels to make the bikes compact when folded, with elegant frames that hinge and lock at mid-frame.
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