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FOOD
February 23, 2012 | By Clifford Wright, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The 5-inch round of cheese was slightly orange, as it should have been, I guess. I cut it in half and, hoping I wouldn't end up in the hospital, I spread the creamy cheese on some bread. Hey, this was good! It tasted like … Camembert? This was the first cheese I'd ever made from scratch. I basically had no idea what I was doing. Not only did I not kill anyone, but I also actually made something that tasted pretty good, which is a testament either to how easy it is to make cheese or to my dumb luck.
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NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Isabella Alsobrook
Homemade yogurt, like giant bell-bottoms and paisley caftans, went out of style in the '70s. Although I am relieved some hippie trends are obsolete, homemade yogurt is long overdue for its revival. Yogurt is surprisingly easy to make. To ferment your own yogurt, heat a quart of milk to 180 degrees, let it cool to 115 degrees, plop in two tablespoons of store-bought yogurt with active cultures, and let sit in a warm oven overnight. Save a spoonful of your new yogurt to act as a starter for your next batch.
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FOOD
July 14, 2011
  Ayib Total time: 20 minutes, plus cooling time Our recipes, your kitchen: If you try this or any other recipe from the L.A. Times Test Kitchen, we would like to know about it so we can showcase it on our food blog and occasionally in print. Upload pictures of the finished dish here. Servings: Makes 1 generous cup ayib. 32 ounces of plain yogurt, plain low-fat yogurt or buttermilk 1. In a deep, heavy-bottom saucepan, heat the yogurt over low heat until it comes to a gentle boil.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - California dairy farmers and cheese processors are fighting again over milk prices. It's not Grade A, homogenized, pasteurized milk that's at issue in the state Capitol. Rather, agriculture lobbyists are focused on the price of whey, a milk byproduct probably best known to consumers who've read the Mother Goose nursery rhyme about little Miss Muffet eating her "curds and whey. " Once thrown away as waste, whey has become a valuable commodity, left over from processing cheese and then used in hundreds of foods, including baby formula and protein powder.
FOOD
September 30, 2010
  Homemade ricotta Total time: About 45 minutes Servings: About 1 pound, or 2 cups Note: This recipe requires the use of a thermometer. 9 cups whole milk 1 cup buttermilk 1 teaspoon salt 2 1/2 tablespoons distilled vinegar 1. Heat the milk and buttermilk in a heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat to a temperature of about 185 degrees. Stir in the salt and vinegar and remove from the heat. Let stand until curds have formed, 5 to 10 minutes.
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Isabella Alsobrook
Homemade yogurt, like giant bell-bottoms and paisley caftans, went out of style in the '70s. Although I am relieved some hippie trends are obsolete, homemade yogurt is long overdue for its revival. Yogurt is surprisingly easy to make. To ferment your own yogurt, heat a quart of milk to 180 degrees, let it cool to 115 degrees, plop in two tablespoons of store-bought yogurt with active cultures, and let sit in a warm oven overnight. Save a spoonful of your new yogurt to act as a starter for your next batch.
HEALTH
September 27, 2010 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When it comes to misguided efforts of average people wishing to pack on muscle, protein supplements are way up there. A 2004 study of exercisers at a Long Island commercial gym that was published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition revealed that more than 40% of regular exercisers take protein supplements more than five times a week. For people looking to get as huge as professional bodybuilders, protein powders do make sense. But for us regular folks who merely want to look good for the beach, bar or bed partner, these probably are unnecessary.
SCIENCE
December 13, 2012 | Rosie Mestel
The shards of old pottery are poked with little holes, remnants of vessels that would have looked a lot like colanders. Now scientists have determined that the fragments -- more than 7,000 years old -- are most likely from ancient cheese-making implements, used for separating curds from whey. Collected from sites along a river in present-day Poland, the pottery pieces are the oldest direct evidence for cheese-making anywhere in the world, the researchers reported Wednesday in the journal Nature.
NEWS
October 18, 2011 | By Rene Lynch, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Emily Zaler's business card should probably read "mad scientist. " When the personal trainer is not putting clients through their paces up and down the famed Santa Monica stairs or working out herself, she's making a mess in her Los Angeles kitchen. There, she modifies recipes that are normally filled with unhealthy fat, sugar and carbs using her favorite secret ingredient: Whey protein powder. Her recipe catalog includes fudge, blueberry crepes, almond butter cookies, sweet potato muffins and more.
FOOD
June 14, 1990 | JOAN DRAKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Question: Can you give me some information about the food value of whey? I have been dripping nonfat yogurt to make a cheese as a substitute for butter on bread. The extracted whey makes a pleasant enough drink, but I want to know what may be lost to those in my family who don't drink it. Answer: "Nutritive Value of American Foods--In Common Units," U.S. Department of Agriculture Handbook No. 456, states one cup of fluid whey contains 64 calories, 2.2 grams protein, 0.7 grams fat, 12.
SCIENCE
December 13, 2012 | Rosie Mestel
The shards of old pottery are poked with little holes, remnants of vessels that would have looked a lot like colanders. Now scientists have determined that the fragments -- more than 7,000 years old -- are most likely from ancient cheese-making implements, used for separating curds from whey. Collected from sites along a river in present-day Poland, the pottery pieces are the oldest direct evidence for cheese-making anywhere in the world, the researchers reported Wednesday in the journal Nature.
FOOD
March 24, 2012
  Total time: 25 minutes, plus 1½ to 2 days setting and draining times Servings: This makes a generous cup of quark. 2 cups whole milk 1/2 cup cultured buttermilk 1. In a stainless steel, heavy-bottomed saucepan, bring the milk to a simmer over medium heat. Remove from heat and set aside until the milk is cooled. Whisk in the buttermilk. 2. Transfer the mixture to a glass, ceramic or plastic container, and set aside at room temperature until the mixture is thickened, with a consistency similar to yogurt or crème fraîche, about 1 day. 3. Transfer the mixture to a cheesecloth-lined strainer set over a bowl.
FOOD
February 23, 2012 | By Clifford Wright, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The 5-inch round of cheese was slightly orange, as it should have been, I guess. I cut it in half and, hoping I wouldn't end up in the hospital, I spread the creamy cheese on some bread. Hey, this was good! It tasted like … Camembert? This was the first cheese I'd ever made from scratch. I basically had no idea what I was doing. Not only did I not kill anyone, but I also actually made something that tasted pretty good, which is a testament either to how easy it is to make cheese or to my dumb luck.
NEWS
October 18, 2011 | By Rene Lynch, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Emily Zaler's business card should probably read "mad scientist. " When the personal trainer is not putting clients through their paces up and down the famed Santa Monica stairs or working out herself, she's making a mess in her Los Angeles kitchen. There, she modifies recipes that are normally filled with unhealthy fat, sugar and carbs using her favorite secret ingredient: Whey protein powder. Her recipe catalog includes fudge, blueberry crepes, almond butter cookies, sweet potato muffins and more.
FOOD
September 30, 2010
  Homemade ricotta Total time: About 45 minutes Servings: About 1 pound, or 2 cups Note: This recipe requires the use of a thermometer. 9 cups whole milk 1 cup buttermilk 1 teaspoon salt 2 1/2 tablespoons distilled vinegar 1. Heat the milk and buttermilk in a heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat to a temperature of about 185 degrees. Stir in the salt and vinegar and remove from the heat. Let stand until curds have formed, 5 to 10 minutes.
HEALTH
September 27, 2010 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When it comes to misguided efforts of average people wishing to pack on muscle, protein supplements are way up there. A 2004 study of exercisers at a Long Island commercial gym that was published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition revealed that more than 40% of regular exercisers take protein supplements more than five times a week. For people looking to get as huge as professional bodybuilders, protein powders do make sense. But for us regular folks who merely want to look good for the beach, bar or bed partner, these probably are unnecessary.
FOOD
May 3, 2000 | DONNA DEANE
Yogurt cheese is yogurt drained of its whey, giving it the consistency of a rich sour cream. It makes a great substitute for high-fat cream cheese- or mayonnaise-based sandwich spreads. It's easy to make. There are special strainers on the market, but you can use a kitchen strainer and cheesecloth, available at most grocery stores. Add a few fresh vegetables and you'll have a wonderful nonfat sandwich spread. I like to spread the filling on crunchy whole-grain bread.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2010 | By Charles Solomon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If Leo Tolstoy had seen the cartoons of Chas. Addams, he would have had to rethink his famous dictum, "All happy families are alike." Gomez and Morticia's misbegotten brood may have been creepy and kooky, but they were also happy, as the cartoons in the delightful anthology "The Addams Family: An Evilution" attest. Addams, born in 1912, sold his first cartoon to the New Yorker in 1932, while he was still a student at the Grand Central School of Art in Manhattan. Six years later, he began the Addams Family saga with a drawing of a cheerfully oblivious door-to-door salesman demonstrating a vacuum cleaner to early versions of Morticia and Lurch: "Vibrationless, noiseless, and a great time and back saver.
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