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Whidbey Island Washington

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A Navy plane tumbled into the ocean during flight training on the carrier Stennis off Southern California, the Navy reported. Three crew members were rescued. The Prowler, based at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island in Washington state, lost brake control while landing on the carrier at 9:15 p.m. Tuesday. The crew members ejected as the plane rolled off the flight deck. No serious injuries were reported. The cause of the incident is under investigation.
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NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The Inn at Langley is a 16-room hotel on Whidbey Island in Washington's Puget Sound. Hop a ferry to get to the island and then take advantage of a sale on midweek stays -- to watch gray whales or just unwind -- starting at $195 a night. The deal: You can find details of this deal under the Whales Are Back! special on the inn's website. Rooms start at $195 plus tax from Mondays through Thursdays until the end of May. Rooms have views of the Saratoga Passage, where gray whales are returning along the Pacific Ocean on their northward migration from Baja, Mexico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2002 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. C. James Carrico, the first physician to tend President Kennedy in a Dallas emergency room immediately after he was mortally wounded, died of colon cancer Thursday at his home in Greenbank on Whidbey Island, Washington. He was 67. The Pasadena-born Carrico, who was president-elect of the American College of Surgeons at the time of his death, was a first-year surgical resident on Nov. 22, 1963, when Kennedy was rushed into Parkland Memorial Hospital.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Just days after a massive landslide changed the topography of Whidbey Island in Washington state, residents are coming to grips with the idea that change is part of life. They have had community meetings in recent days since the slide pushed an estimated 200,000 cubic yards of earth down the west side of the island in Puget Sound, about 50 miles north of Seattle. What they want is some sense of the timeline for when things will return to normal, Eric Brooks, deputy director of Island County Emergency Management told the Los Angeles Times on Friday.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Three Navy fliers were killed when their jet crashed about 50 miles west of Spokane, Wash., on Monday, officials said. The fliers were on a training mission on an EA-6B Prowler based at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island , on Washington's Puget Sound. No one on the ground was hurt, Navy officials said. The fliers' names are to be kept confidential for a day while their families are notified, officials said. A farmworker, Mike Johnson, told the Spokesman-Review newspaper that he was feeding cattle shortly before 9 a.m. when he saw a black mushroom cloud rise soundlessly in the distance.
NEWS
February 7, 1986 | Associated Press
Five members of the violent, white-supremacist group The Order were sentenced Thursday to prison terms of up to 100 years for their roles in a plot to overthrow the government and establish an Aryan homeland. Bruce Carroll Pierce, 31, Randolph George Duey, 35, Gary Lee Yarbrough, 30, Andrew Virgil Barnhill, 29, and Richard Harold Kemp, 23, were sentenced by U.S. District Judge Walter McGovern. McGovern presided over a 3 1/2-month trial that ended Dec.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Geologists searched for clues Thursday to explain the collapse of a 1,000-foot chunk of hillside on the west side of Whidbey Island in Washington state that left a number of homes in danger. The geological team was on the island, located in Puget Sound about 50 miles north of Seattle, and is expected to report its findings soon, Terry Clark, a spokeswoman for the Island County Emergency Management Department, said Thursday morning in a telephone interview with the Los Angeles Times.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
The Navy awarded a $279.4-million contract to Raytheon Co. to build the next generation of electronic attack jammers, which spew radio waves and emit other electromagnetic noise to jumble enemy signals. Electronic warfare technology -- much of it top secret -- aims to counterbalance foreign militaries' multimillion-dollar investments in shoring up air defenses and continuing advancements in radar detection. The technology is key to the military executing bombing missions. Military aircraft outfitted with jammers accompany fighter jets and bombers.
TRAVEL
November 12, 1989 | JERRY HULSE
The salad days of vintage railroad domeliners will be returning to California in 1990. Beginning March 1, the refurbished cars (oak, brass, plush carpeting) will operate daily between Los Angeles and Oakland. Unobstructed views. A dining salon featuring Irish linens, imported china. (No plastic plates on these cars.) Meals prepared to order. The domeliners will be operated by Princess Tours on Amtrak's Coast Starlight run. Other Princess dome cars serve Alaska.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
In the skies above Libya, the U.S. Navy has been deploying a small fleet of supersonic EA-18 Growler jets to "jam" Moammar Kadafi's ground radar, giving NATO fighters and bombers free rein to strike tanks, communication depots and other strategic targets. It's the latest demonstration of "electronic attack" hardware — the "EA" in the Growler's name. Armies have been waging electronic warfare since World War II, but today's technology packs a strategic wallop unforeseen even a decade ago. With foreign adversaries continuing to improve their radar capabilities and air defense networks, and terrorists worldwide using modern consumer electronics to trigger explosives, the United States is spending billions of dollars in a massive effort to respond.
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