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ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1986
Colman Andrews' response to Barbara Wong's letter entitled, "Vegetarianism: the Meat of the Matter," has several flaws (Restaurant Notebook, Nov. 30). Individuals that opt for a meat-free diet do not do so on "whim," as Andrews stated. Whim involves an emotional response to an issue, unguided by rational thought. Most vegetarians have based their dietary decision on a complex system of values and observations, which perhaps involves more critical thinking than our meat-eating counterparts have invested.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
November 24, 2012 | By Ron Goldman
I was treading water at an ad agency in Toronto when I spied an unusual ad in the morning paper. It was an announcement from the U.S. government recruiting able-bodied Canadians to apply for a lottery to enter the U.S. legally with a resident alien, or green, card. I took the bait and signed up. Fast-forward two years. I arrived home from work on a miserable winter afternoon and found a large envelope in my mailbox. The U.S. Department of Immigration was inviting me to live in the United States!
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NEWS
August 30, 1988
Salesman David Vicari bought a single lotto ticket on a whim. He's now $6.54 million richer. Vicari, 31, and his wife, Marjorie, are expecting their third child. The couple live in Cameron Park, an El Dorado County community built around a private airport. Vicari's whim will result in annual checks netting him $261,600 after taxes for the next 20 years.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
So, against all odds, you managed to get your hands on a few shares of Facebook stock via one of the most hyped initial public offerings of all time and managed to survive its messy first day of trading. Congratulations. You're now married to Mark Zuckerberg. The 28-year-old company founder is today one of the most deeply-entrenched chief executives in American business. Thanks to a two-class stock structure, Zuckerberg will own about 28% of Facebook but control 57% of all shareholder votes.
WORLD
February 17, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A British anti-terrorism law that could prevent tourists or others from taking pictures of police and troops took effect, prompting about 200 photographers to protest. Although the measure aims to prevent reconnaissance shots, photographers say it could be misused at a whim to stop any pictures from being taken -- especially images involving police abuse and demonstrations. Photographers who refuse to stop taking pictures after a warning could face up to 10 years in prison or unspecified fines.
SPORTS
March 12, 1988
With regard to USC's lack of success in basketball, I am inclined to give Coach Raveling the benefit of the doubt. No program can be successful in the Pac-10 without a real home court, and I believe USC is the only school without one. The Sports Arena is totally inadequate and is at the whim of the Coliseum Commission. USC should build a facility on campus, or get out of the sport. JOHN McPHERSON Manhattan Beach
OPINION
March 29, 1987
Exciting headlines announcing the release of Soviet dissidents won't mean anything until the Soviet system of justice itself changes, guaranteeing free speech, the right to assemble and other civil rights. When Soviet dissidents are released they can be detained again at government whim. Meanwhile, dissidents serve sometimes as "window dressing" to win concessions from the West when their release is announced. The "good news" is applauded around the world, often distracting attention from unpalatable Soviet actions taking place elsewhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2001
Re "Doctor Found Liable in Suit Over Pain," June 15: This indictment of elder abuse against Dr. Wing Chin sends a chilling message to the medical profession. I simply cannot imagine that any other profession would be held to such an unreasonable standard. If judges were not immune to suits in carrying out their duty, would they be held responsible by the defendant for having handed out too heavy a penalty and by the plaintiff for not having punished the guilty severely enough? If Chin was not treating pain aggressively enough, he should more appropriately have been required to enroll in a pain-management program, instead of being subjected to a $1.5-million fine based on the emotional whim of a jury.
OPINION
May 14, 1989
The decision on Proposition 103 is an abomination. One's position on this initiative is not an issue of being pro- or anti-business. It is an issue of being for or against individual rights. Consistent with the premise that an individual has an inalienable right to his life, is the fact that he has a right to the products that his life is used to create. In other words, a businessman who owns an insurance company has the inalienable right to set the prices and terms of his business, and to determine who he will and will not trade with.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1987
Two weeks ago Outtakes asked readers to help count the buckles attached to Michael Jackson's "Bad" outfit and, more earthshakingly, explain why the Ungloved One is wearing so many of them. The deluge of loose leaf and post cards and even a typed letter or two was overwhelming. Not one managed to come up with the correct number. According to Jackson's PR people, Michael--who designed the outfit himself--is wearing 46 buckles. Why? The PR people said Michael said there's no special meaning behind them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2010 | By Mary Rourke, Special to The Times
Helen Chaplin, a sprightly senior executive at the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel for more than 40 years who won the hearts of European royalty, heads of state, political pundits and A-list celebrities by attending to their whims as guests, has died. She was 97. FOR THE RECORD: Helen Chaplin obituary: A news obituary of hotel executive Helen Chaplin in Tuesday's LATExtra section quoted Bill Wilkinson, the former president of Ayala Hotels who hired Chaplin to work at the Checkers Hotel in downtown Los Angeles, but failed to note that Wilkinson died in July.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2010 | By Nelson George, Special to the Los Angeles Times
? Helen Folasade Adu, a.k.a. pop soul chanteuse Sade, had been a complete vegetarian for nine years when she spotted some lambs on her farm in England. "I hate to say this," she intones in the warm, husky voice beloved by her fans for the last 25 years, "but when I saw these lambs gamboling through the field and I started to salivate and I thought I should get to the tandoori shop quick before I pull a leg off one of the lambs. It's weird. I just thought the natural thing to do right now was to eat meat.
OPINION
August 19, 2010
An appellate court judge once likened Gregory Taylor, a homeless man who was sentenced to 25 years to life in prison for trying to break into a church food kitchen because he was hungry, to Jean Valjean, the hero of Victor Hugo's " Les Miserables. " It was an apt comparison. Taylor, who was finally ordered released Monday by a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge, is a symbol of everything that's wrong with California's three-strikes law — just as Hugo intended Valjean to represent what was wrong with post-Revolutionary France.
WORLD
February 17, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A British anti-terrorism law that could prevent tourists or others from taking pictures of police and troops took effect, prompting about 200 photographers to protest. Although the measure aims to prevent reconnaissance shots, photographers say it could be misused at a whim to stop any pictures from being taken -- especially images involving police abuse and demonstrations. Photographers who refuse to stop taking pictures after a warning could face up to 10 years in prison or unspecified fines.
TRAVEL
June 15, 2008 | Jay Jones, Special to The Times
Roger Thomas has what many people would consider a dream job: jetting across the globe in search of the finest furnishings and antiques and then buying whatever strikes his fancy -- using someone else's money. That someone else is Steve Wynn, who in 1998 set the standard for luxury in Las Vegas with the opening of Bellagio. A decade later, he's still raising the bar with Wynn Las Vegas, which opened in 2005, and an adjoining new hotel -- Encore -- which will welcome its first guests in December.
WORLD
April 19, 2008 | Tracy Wilkinson and Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writers
Pope Benedict XVI on Friday called for collective diplomacy, and not "the decisions of a few," to resolve conflicts and said human rights had to be based on "unchanging justice" and not the legal whims of the day. Going before a special session of the United Nations, the pope also made a plea for religious freedom as a universal right.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2000
Re "The Pied Piper of Violent Media Has a Hold on Our Children," Commentary, Sept. 15: I'm amused, but not surprised, at how the FTC report on selling violence to kids has given parents yet another scapegoat for their bad parenting. Don't parents like Patricia Ramsey understand that their children being "targets of deliberate marketing strategies" should be no match for good parenting? Of course not, because the parents of today are too anxious to cater to their child's every whim.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Miles Teller almost died a few years ago. After spending a few days at a Connecticut music festival, he and two buddies were road tripping home to Florida. Cruising down the highway at 75 mph, Teller's friend tried to switch lanes and nearly hit another vehicle. He jerked the steering wheel back but lost control of the car, which went across three lanes of traffic, into a grass median, and flipped seven times. Teller was thrown 25 feet and awoke covered in blood. "I still have two rocks in my face," the boyish 23-year-old actor said, showing off scars on his chin, neck and shoulder.
NEWS
April 6, 2008 | Mark Niesse, Associated Press
As fiery lava pours down Kilauea volcano toward Jean Olson's lonely wooden house, incinerating everything in its path, there's no place she'd rather be. "Why would I live here if I didn't like it? I have the best view of anyone in town," said Olson, who lives about a mile from fountains of glowing lava spewing into the ocean. "Either she comes or she doesn't. If she comes, we'll pick up and leave." Thousands of visitors a day come to nearby Hawaii Volcanoes National Park to watch Kilauea erupt, something it has been doing for a quarter of a century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2005 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
The California Supreme Court appeared unlikely Wednesday to force a major overhaul of the California Coastal Commission or a reconsideration of its permit denials over the last 30 years. During a televised hearing in Los Angeles, several members of the state high court seemed doubtful of a lawsuit's claims that the makeup of the coastal regulatory agency violates the state Constitution.
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