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Whisky Nightclub

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NEWS
February 20, 2003 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
Alexi MURDOCH, a long-haired, bearded singer-songwriter, stands on the Troubadour stage, picking a moody scale on his guitar and singing an expressive, introspective lyric. The crowd, which includes press, record label reps and movie soundtrack supervisors, quiets down and tunes in to his dusky voice. It's the classic Troubadour tableau, as inscribed in the early '70s, when it was arguably the most famous nightclub in the world.
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NEWS
February 20, 2003 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
Alexi MURDOCH, a long-haired, bearded singer-songwriter, stands on the Troubadour stage, picking a moody scale on his guitar and singing an expressive, introspective lyric. The crowd, which includes press, record label reps and movie soundtrack supervisors, quiets down and tunes in to his dusky voice. It's the classic Troubadour tableau, as inscribed in the early '70s, when it was arguably the most famous nightclub in the world.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1990 | JONATHAN GOLD
"And now from New York . . . Hazel ," says master of ceremonies Sam Mann at the Whisky on the Sunset Strip as a band mopes on stage, fluffy long hair and stickers from the Brooklyn heavy-metal club L'Amour on their guitar cases. "Dude, they've changed their name to Jewel," someone shouts up to Mann. "Oh," the emcee says into the microphone. "Then I guess this is . . . Jewel ." The band starts to play in a way that suggests somebody had flicked on a switch.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1999 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They put the a Go Go back in the Whisky on Saturday. Literally. Kicking off the first night of a weeklong celebration of the landmark Sunset Strip club's 35th anniversary, Johnny Rivers was on stage playing "Memphis" and other hits with two go-go dancers shimmying on stage and a third in a cage on a platform off the balcony--just as it was when Rivers opened the place in 1964.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1999 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They put the a Go Go back in the Whisky on Saturday. Literally. Kicking off the first night of a weeklong celebration of the landmark Sunset Strip club's 35th anniversary, Johnny Rivers was on stage playing "Memphis" and other hits with two go-go dancers shimmying on stage and a third in a cage on a platform off the balcony--just as it was when Rivers opened the place in 1964.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1996 | HEIDI SIEGMUND CUDA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A sad clubland truth: Hollywood's breed of club-goer takes its nightspots for granted. Scenesters sniff at the notion of waiting in line. And they sniff even more if there isn't a line. And though a space such as Club Lingerie was once the heart of the underground music scene, it can close its neon-lighted doors without a tear shed by those who called it home. In this trend-eat-trend world, it's a wonder there are any survivors.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1993 | STEVEN LINAN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Paying Up: The rock band Van Halen paid the city $10,000 to help cover police costs when 3,000 fans turned out at the Whisky nightclub for 200 tickets for a concert. "We basically told them, 'You pick up the bill for this, or it's over, folks.' And they agreed," West Hollywood City Manager Paul Brotzman said. However, the Van Halen money still won't pay the entire tab for sheriff's deputies and Beverly Hills police who handled crowd control outside the Sunset Boulevard club on Wednesday.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | ANN CONWAY
Looking for moments that are Maalox-free? Beep Janet Rosener. As Orange County's caterer with cachet--from "The Doors" movie premiere bash in Los Angeles to a lunch this week at Casa Pacifica in San Clemente--Rosener has built a reputation on taking care of business. Take Saturday's benefit for the Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation. The early-bird breakfast celebrating the unveiling of a new carousel at South Coast Plaza's Crystal Court could have been a bacon and eggs free-for-all.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON
Darkness had descended on Sunset Boulevard hours ago, and the Saturday night ritual of the Strip People was revving up to full, nerve-jangling gear. The neon-lit air was choked with heavy--heavy music, heavy sounds and heavy traffic. On the littered sidewalk, punkers in torn shirts maneuvered past young rockers in buckled boots conversing in large groups or waiting to get into Gazzarri's. The informal dress code of the street was black-and-blue anything.
NEWS
April 29, 1997 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eliot Garcia, 23, says he learned English from "Batman" reruns. Now he sings Spanglish rock anthems about police brutality, drug-related violence and the O.J. media circus. His Tijuana band, Nessie, has already cracked Los Angeles' Whisky nightclub and MTV Latino. Jose Hugo Sanchez is a performero--performance artist. His ranting monologues, as littered with U.S. pop images as Tijuana is with Coca-Cola and Guess jeans ads, describe how poor U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1996 | HEIDI SIEGMUND CUDA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A sad clubland truth: Hollywood's breed of club-goer takes its nightspots for granted. Scenesters sniff at the notion of waiting in line. And they sniff even more if there isn't a line. And though a space such as Club Lingerie was once the heart of the underground music scene, it can close its neon-lighted doors without a tear shed by those who called it home. In this trend-eat-trend world, it's a wonder there are any survivors.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1990 | JONATHAN GOLD
"And now from New York . . . Hazel ," says master of ceremonies Sam Mann at the Whisky on the Sunset Strip as a band mopes on stage, fluffy long hair and stickers from the Brooklyn heavy-metal club L'Amour on their guitar cases. "Dude, they've changed their name to Jewel," someone shouts up to Mann. "Oh," the emcee says into the microphone. "Then I guess this is . . . Jewel ." The band starts to play in a way that suggests somebody had flicked on a switch.
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