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White Collar

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
Just when you thought bromance was dead, here comes "White Collar," a crime drama premiering on USA tonight that lifts the genre to a new and dazzling level. Sparkling, snappy, bursting with energy and good clean heist fun, the first episode of "White Collar" may, in fact, be the most perfect pilot to air in a long, long time. Sure, there are shameless echoes of "It Takes a Thief," the show that launched Robert Wagner's television career, but who cares? Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, and "White Collar's" creator, Jeff Easton, promises only improvement, and with a pitch-perfect cast that comes together to create that cinematic Holy Grail: chemistry.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 16, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Last week President Obama ordered the Department of Labor to revise regulations determining which workers qualify for federal overtime protections, a move that was presented as a way to increase income for some lower-wage workers. It's not. In reality, it's a matter of basic fairness. The issue begins with the federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, which established the national minimum wage for most workers and guaranteed overtime pay for more than 40 hours of work a week. But the law also allowed overtime exemptions to be set by the Labor Department.
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NEWS
April 3, 2002 | JOHN BALZAR
From 1992 to 2001, the Securities and Exchange Commission referred 609 Wall Street crimes to federal prosecutors. Of that total, 87 people went to prison, fewer than 10 each year on average. In a federal prison population of 156,238, only 1,021 inmates now fit even a broad definition of white-collar criminals. And more than half of them are doing easy time at low-security "Club Fed" institutions. Since 1985, the percentage of white-collar criminals in our federal prison population has dropped almost fivefold.
OPINION
January 4, 2014
Re "Why execs, not companies, should face prosecution," Column, Jan. 1 Michael Hiltzik and U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff get it right. The lack of will to prosecute crooks goes back at least a decade, when our anti-tax members of Congress made the government too weak to prosecute the privileged and wealthy. White-collar crime has been effectively decriminalized. Most instances of government weakness can be blamed on inadequate funding. Part of this is because we have the poor and middle class hit the hardest by sales taxes while a transaction tax that hits the investor class is a no-no.
OPINION
July 27, 2002
Re "Adelphia Founder, 2 Sons Are Charged With Fraud," July 25: John Rigas and his two sons are charged with stealing $1 billion. Retirees have lost their investments, workers have lost their jobs and creditors are left holding the bag, hoping to get a few pennies on the dollar. The Rigases are looking at 15 1/2 to 19 1/2 years, if convicted. What do crack addicts in New York City get? What about the "three strike" petty-theft cases in California? Is there a two-tier system of justice in a democracy?
BUSINESS
June 7, 1992
In the Footnotes column (April 27), reference is made to Mike Tyson making 65 cents per day as a convicted rapist in prison versus his $219,780-per-second earnings in a title fight. To be fair and a little less divisive, why not also include the prison versus heyday salaries of Michael Milken and other white-collar criminals? The Times still refers to Milken as a financial "wizard." I am not black, but I am sensitive to the mention of Tyson when not enough is made of these crooks in banking, finance and insurance.
OPINION
February 18, 2002
Re "Enron Is But a Pebble in the Wave," Commentary, Feb. 13: That "pebble in the wave" will be just the first sign of an impending avalanche if it doesn't prompt some changes in the way the me-first American economy operates these days. If James Pinkerton is correct that "the future still belongs to market forces," then we could all be in trouble. What's needed are: corporate boards and executives who will stand up to the investors who greenmail them into pursuing short-term profits at the expense of long-term growth and stability; institutional investors who stop acting like day traders in responding frantically to non-news; and CFOs who know that padding your bottom line with derivatives is a lot like expecting to win every time you walk into a Vegas casino.
NEWS
August 29, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
President Reagan today froze salaries of federal white-collar employees at their present levels for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1, in line with the budget adopted by Congress. Reagan originally had proposed a reduction of 5%. The office of the federal pay agent, which is required by law to compare federal pay with that in the private sector, said it would take a 19.15% increase to bring federal employees up to the pay of comparable workers in private employment.
NEWS
September 14, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
The Senate Judiciary Committee plans to investigate the Justice Department's handling of white-collar crime, committee Chairman Strom Thurmond (R-S. C.) said Friday. The panel agreed to look into the department's handling of a series of prosecutions against large corporations after Sen. Howard M. Metzenbaum (D-Ohio) criticized the department for dropping charges against or failing to seek prison terms for individuals in cases involving E. F. Hutton & Co., Eli Lilly & Co.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | STRAT DOUTHAT, Associated Press
Deep in the aromatic pine woods of the Florida Panhandle is a small place where some of the best known and wealthiest of men come to spend time. Occasionally, the locals say, the swells arrive in fancy cars driven by uniformed chauffeurs. Among the recent visitors were the head of a famous fashion house, a federal judge and a former congressman. Even top sports figures, such as LaMarr Hoyt, the Cy Young Award-winning pitcher, sometimes show up. Here these big shots may try Italian lawn-bowling or indulge themselves on the tennis courts, play a game of racquetball or take a turn on the foot trail that winds through the landscaped grounds and past a lake.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
When he heard about a shake-up at company headquarters, Mark Sprague got a knot in the pit of his stomach. It wasn't his executive job that was at stake at the international real estate brokerage CBRE Group Inc. It was his spacious office of 11 years, his cherished file cabinets and his trophies. They all had to go. Sprague and everyone else in the company's 200-person office were given no choice by management. Everyone was to be part of an experiment to create the company's first completely "untethered" office in the United States where employees roam freely.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
Why hasn't anyone on Wall Street gone to prison for the 2008 financial crisis? Perhaps because the FBI is recommending far fewer white-collar prosecutions. The FBI has recommended only 2,001 white-collar cases for criminal prosecution so far this fiscal year, on pace for a nearly 7% drop from last year, according to a report Tuesday by a research group affiliated with Syracuse University. It would be one of the lowest years on record and would extend a years-long trend, according to government data obtained by the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By Inkoo Kang
Mary Death (Christian Pitre) is the future's biggest celebrity. In her sexy-waitress mini dress and white vinyl go-go boots, she's every bit the self-promoter Kim Kardashian is. But instead of a reality show, in "Bounty Killer," Mary's famous for being "the greatest killer the world has ever known," a ferocious, bloodthirsty pinup queen. Mary and Drifter (Matthew Marsden), her former lover and current rival, are swoon-worthy folk heroes who ruthlessly mow down the enemy of the people: white-collar criminals.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By Alan Eyerly
"Graceland," an original crime drama premiering June 6 on USA Network, isn't set in Memphis. Instead, the location is sunny and sexy Manhattan Beach, where agents with the FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration and Immigration and Customs Enforcement mastermind dangerous sting operations. When they're not surfing or partying, that is. Sound farfetched? Maybe, but "Graceland" is inspired by the true story of a beachfront mansion once owned by a drug kingpin - and huge Elvis Presley fan. Seized by the U.S. government in 1992, the mansion was used until 2001 as a secret operations base.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2013 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - The next wave of union protesters isn't blue collar. It's lawyers, paralegals, secretaries, helicopter pilots, judges, insurance agents and podiatrists. These white-collar workers are not exactly the picture of the labor movement, but they are becoming a more essential part of it as they turn to unions for help in a tough economy as bosses try to squeeze out more profits. "Employers have been downsizing, asking employees to take on larger roles, making them work more hours," said Nicole Korkolis, spokeswoman for the Office and Professional Employees International Union.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Groundbreaking actress-singer Diahann Carroll ("Julia," "Claudine") was an 18-year-old New York model when her singing career took off. Her break came when she won a talent show called, appropriately enough, "Chance of a Lifetime" in January 1954 on the old DuMont Network. Besides the cash prize, she was booked at the famed Latin Quarter nightclub. By year's end she had made her film debut in Otto Preminger's "Carmen Jones" with Dorothy Dandridge and Harry Belafonte and her Broadway bow in the Truman Capote-Harold Arlen musical "House of Flowers" with the legendary Pearl Bailey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1994 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephen N. Getzoff is no ordinary rent-a-cop. Sure, he's a reserve police officer. But armed with a calculator and a balance sheet, there's a good chance Getzoff can tell if your company is being ripped off. White-collar fraud is a multibillion dollar business, and people like Getzoff are the Sam Spades of corporate crime. Getzoff recently became a Certified Fraud Examiner after three decades of fraud sleuthing, tying him into a worldwide network of white-collar crime busters.
NEWS
January 1, 1993 | JOHN MORELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tacked, Barred and Chained: If you're a white collar worker and male, at some point in your career you will probably be given a symbol of your employer's appreciation for your years of service: a tie tack, bar or chain with the corporate seal or trademark soldered on top. Of course, you'd probably prefer the cash, but if you end up getting the tie restraint, you may as well try it.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - Preet Bharara, the man dubbed the new sheriff of Wall Street, notched another arrest in the government's vast insider trading probe. This time the top federal prosecutor in Manhattan nabbed a top portfolio manager at one of America's biggest hedge funds. SAC Capital Advisors' Michael Steinberg was led out of his Park Avenue apartment building in handcuffs early Friday morning. It's a major arrest at a fund that has long drawn government scrutiny. Bharara, 44, has carved out a reputation for being a tough prosecutor who has overseen some of the most high-profile white-collar criminal cases since the 1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of March 3 - 9, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies   SERIES "Wild Things With Dominic Monaghan" The new episode "Giant Malaysian Honey Bees" looks at surprisingly large insects. 7 and 10 p.m. BBC America "Celebrity Wife Swap" Rapper Coolio's girlfriend switches places with Mark McGrath's wife for a week in this new episode.
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