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BUSINESS
April 19, 1990 | DAVE SKIDMORE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Financier Charles H. Keating Jr. on Wednesday rejected a suggestion that he tried to remove any thrift regulator who challenged him, but he acknowledged that he took his complaints about one top official as far as to the White House chief of staff. Office of Thrift Supervision attorney James Murphy, defending the government's April, 1989, seizure of Keating's Lincoln Savings & Loan Assn., suggested during the hearing in U.S.
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NATIONAL
December 11, 2013 | Christi Parsons
With his popularity flagging and his healthcare law at risk, President Obama has uncharacteristically reached outside his tightknit core of advisors to bring into the White House a veteran Democratic strategist who helped guide President Clinton through the darkest days of his presidency. The appointment of John Podesta, who was the White House chief of staff during the Monica Lewinsky scandal and the impeachment proceedings in Congress, is an acknowledgment by Obama of the extent of the problems that have dogged the first year of his second term.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1992 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting in what "Crossfire" sidekick Michael Kinsley has dubbed the "Pat Buchanan memorial chair" has given John Sununu new faith in the humorous side of fate. "I'm a strong supporter of George Bush, obviously," said Sununu, the former White House chief of staff. "To be here, commenting on Pat Buchanan's candidacy, is one of the pleasant ironies of life."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc, Los Angeles Times
Rex Scouten, whose 48-year career in the White House began with the Trumans and ended with the Clintons, and whose duties included helping first families transition to their oversized new home, died Feb. 20 at a hospital near his home in Fairfax, Va. He was 88. The cause was complications from hip surgery, said his daughter Carol Scouten. Scouten started as a Secret Service agent and ended his career as curator of the White House's art and furnishings. Most of his years were spent as chief usher of the White House, primarily managing the 132-room mansion.
OPINION
March 2, 2010 | Jonah Goldberg
The president is surrounded by acolytes of the Cult of Obama. They consider him to be a "transformational figure" who need not sully himself with the usual rules of politics. The president himself subscribes to this point of view, rejecting suggestions that he recalibrate his Olympian ambitions. That's not me saying that. It's not even one of my knuckle-dragging, baby-eating, right-wing brethren. It's Dana Milbank, the liberal Washington Post writer widely seen as Maureen Dowd in drag by most conservatives.
OPINION
March 11, 1990 | Gregg Easterbrook, Gregg Easterbrook is a contributing editor to Newsweek
The Washington pundit class loves tales of personality conflicts at senior levels. Speculating about who's knifing whom is more fun than addressing that annoyance, the issues. In this spirit, the recent, heavily hyped "clash" between White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator William K. Reilly has been, to columnists and the shout-show circuit, just what the doctor ordered.
NEWS
November 14, 1993 | JEFF WILSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
H.R. (Bob) Haldeman, President Richard M. Nixon's fiercely protective chief of staff who served 18 months in prison for covering up the Watergate break-in, died Friday. He was 67. Haldeman died of abdominal cancer at his rambling, single-story home overlooking the Pacific Ocean in Santa Barbara's Hope Ranch neighborhood. His son, Hank, said he had been ill for only a month. Nixon was saddened by the news.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1992 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former White House chief of staff--and convicted Watergate felon--H.R. (Bob) Haldeman had a message Wednesday for inquiring high school students who peppered him with questions about working for President Richard M. Nixon. "For Pete's sake," he implored 100 Southern California student newspaper editors, who were not yet born during the 1972 Watergate burglary, "don't believe what you read in history books (just) because of the fact that those words are printed."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1991
The only fault of (White House Chief of Staff) John Sununu's trips is that they are not one-way. MARK NICHOLS Beverly Hills
NEWS
July 17, 1986
White House chief of staff Donald T. Regan scrapped a plan by Surgeon General C. Everett Koop to testify before Congress this week in favor of legislation that would ban all advertising of tobacco products, Administration officials said. The Office of Management and Budget also withheld approval of Koop's remarks on grounds that the legislation has implications beyond health issues, officials said.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Christi Parsons, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - President Obama on Thursday will nominate his chief of staff, Jacob J. Lew, a fiscal policy expert with deep Washington roots, as his new Treasury secretary to help lead the administration through budget battles ahead. Lew, 57, would replace Timothy F. Geithner, who has been planning to leave the administration this month, according to a White House official. The official announcement is expected to come at 10:30 a.m. Pacific time. “Throughout his career, Jack Lew has proven a successful and effective advocate for middle-class families who can build bipartisan consensus to implement proven economic policies,” the White House said.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
After a frustrating year of setbacks and bruising fights with Republicans, President Obama accepted the resignation of Chief of Staff William Daley and turned to a Washington veteran in an attempt to improve White House operations and the administration's dealings with Congress. Obama announced Monday that Daley, who three months ago said he would remain in the post until after the 2012 election, would be replaced by budget director Jacob Lew, whose White House experience dates to President Clinton's administration.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2011 | By Christi Parsons, Lisa Mascaro and Katherine Skiba, Washington Bureau
As White House Chief of Staff William Daley adjourned a recent morning meeting, a senior staff member whispered a question to another as they left the office: "Is that what it's like in a boardroom?" It's both a compliment and a criticism White House staffers have offered about Daley's detached management style — he prefers to operate at "30,000 feet," as one senior administration official put it — since he left the corporate world and returned to Washington to run President Obama's team 10 months ago. This week, President Obama appeared to acknowledge that method wasn't working.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
The Republican-controlled House Energy and Commerce Committee voted to issue a broad subpoena demanding more documents from the White House as part of the committee's investigation into a government loan guarantee for the failed solar equipment maker Solyndra. In a vote along party lines, the committee's subcommittee on oversight approved a draft subpoena that calls for all "internal communications" among top White House staff during the period in 2009 when Solyndra sought a $535-million loan guarantee from the government, through its financial troubles in 2010 and, ultimately, during its move toward bankruptcy protection two months ago. "The committee still hopes to work with the White House to obtain relevant communications from key personnel such as former White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel, senior advisor Valerie Jarrett, former National Economic Council Director Larry Summers and Ron Klain, former chief of staff to Vice President [Joe]
NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
The Republican-controlled House Energy and Commerce Committee voted to issue a broad subpoena demanding more documents from the White House as part of the committee's ongoing investigation into a government loan guarantee to the failed solar equipment maker Solyndra. In a vote along party lines, the committee's subcommittee on oversight approved a draft subpoena that calls for all "internal communications" among top White House staff during the period in 2009 when Solyndra sought a $535-million loan guarantee from the government through its financial troubles in 2010 and, ultimately, during its move toward bankruptcy protection two months ago. "The committee still hopes to work with the White House to obtain relevant communications from key personnel such as former White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel, Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett, former National Economic Council Director Larry Summers, and Ron Klain, former Chief of Staff to Vice President Biden," the Energy and Commerce Republicans said in a statement in preparation for the vote.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas and Neela Banerjee
Reporting from Washington Shifting its position on Energy Department loan guarantees, the White House said it would review all pledges to avoid such ill-fated decisions as the much-publicized $535-million loan guarantee for California solar equipment maker Solyndra, which fell into bankruptcy early last month. The step aims to defuse the embarrassing Solyndra episode, which has given rise to criticism that the Obama administration has wasted hundreds of millions of dollars in public money.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Beginning Tuesday, former White House chief of staff Donald T. Regan will be a Tuesday regular on NBC News' "Before Hours," the very early morning business program produced by NBC in cooperation with the Wall Street Journal. Regan, former CEO for Merrill Lynch and also Treasury secretary in the Reagan Administration, has signed a one-year contract.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2003 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Donald T. Regan, who rose from an Irish working-class background to serve as a groundbreaking chairman and chief executive of Merrill Lynch and later as Treasury secretary and controversial chief of staff for President Reagan, died Tuesday. He was 84. Regan, who had been battling cancer, died at a hospital in Williamsburg, Va. He was admitted to the hospital Sunday.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2011 | By Christi Parsons and Tom Hamburger, Los Angeles Times
President Obama, taking new steps to repair ties with the country's business leaders and win their support for his economic agenda, dispatched his top aide to meet with chief executives on key issues — especially the need to raise the limit on federal debt and head off concern over a national default. White House Chief of Staff Bill Daley, a former business executive and Obama's chief emissary in the effort, urged Chicago business leaders in meetings Wednesday and Thursday to convey their own worries about the threat of default to Republican leaders in Congress.
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