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NATIONAL
January 6, 2011 | By Katherine Skiba, Washington Bureau
Tina Tchen has plenty of qualities that made her a logical choice as First Lady Michelle Obama's top aide, but here's one that will come in especially handy: Tchen sleeps only four hours a night. Appointed Wednesday as chief of staff to the first lady, Tchen cited a "biological-clock thing" in explaining why she sleeps only from 2 to 6 a.m. "I have the good fortune to not need a lot of sleep," she said. "That's been a great gift. " The other 20 hours a day, Tchen earns a reputation as "driven," "indefatigable" and "phenomenally brilliant," according to friends and colleagues.
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OPINION
April 18, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - From Solyndra to Benghazi to the rollout of the Affordable Care Act, Ed Siskel has been the bespectacled, behind-the-scenes lawyer with the forensic assignment - figure out exactly what went wrong so the White House can fix it, explain it and make sure it does not happen again. After three years in the Office of White House Counsel, one as its deputy, the Chicago-area native has left the job of damage prevention and control to others, and moved on to private practice with a firm in the nation's capital.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1986 | United Press International
President Reagan Tuesday named Haley Barbour, a special assistant to the President, as deputy assistant to the President and director of the White House Office of Political Affairs.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Kathleen Sebelius, who helped guide the rocky and controversial rollout of President Obama's landmark healthcare law, is stepping down as Health and Human Services secretary after about five years, according to a senior administration official. In her place, the president plans to nominate Sylvia Mathews Burwell, director of the White House Office of Management and Budget. Sebelius was not pressured to resign, according to the administration official. But she leaves after presiding over the disastrous launch of the health law's new online insurance marketplaces last fall.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- As part of its campaign to step up efforts to address climate change, the White House on Wednesday announced the creation of a new website to serve as a one-stop location for the enormous amount of climate data housed at different federal agencies. The initiative to make the information more accessible to communities, researchers and industries trying to adapt to global warming is the latest move by the White House to deliver on a pledge that President Obama made last June to use his executive authority to address the causes and effects of climate change in light of congressional inaction on the issue.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | Associated Press
President Bush will not revive a special White House office on women's issues that was created under President Clinton, a spokeswoman said Wednesday. The National Organization for Women decried the decision as "really foolish and high-handed."
NEWS
May 27, 2000 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court Friday rebuked a lower-court judge for declaring that President Clinton broke the law when he released friendly letters from former White House volunteer Kathleen Willey, who had gone on national television to accuse the president of making unwanted sexual advances. The appellate judges said that an opinion by U.S. District Judge Royce C.
OPINION
March 5, 2007
Re "Justices weigh 'faith-based' case," March 1 What good is the 1st Amendment if citizens cannot sue to prevent the White House from spending tax money to promote religion? The Supreme Court should proclaim that taxpayers have legal standing to challenge faith-based initiatives such as those engineered by the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. President Bush's shameful record of insinuating religion into politics demonstrates that the government will not police itself.
OPINION
February 10, 2009
Re "Bush religious policy upheld," Feb. 6 Thank you for getting it right in your coverage of President Obama's new faith-based program. His aides and spokespeople are trying to convince Americans that creating "mechanisms" for legal review and allowing "consideration" of difficult issues amount to improvement of a program that was constitutionally flawed and corrupt under President Bush. But the fact is, in unveiling his White House Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships on Thursday, Obama punted.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2002 | From Reuters
The White House tried to shrug off questions Friday about a computer disk found on a Washington street by a Senate Democratic aide that outlines Republican political strategies and vulnerabilities for the 2002 elections. The disk contains presentations by White House Political Director Ken Mehlman and senior political advisor Karl Rove urging Republican candidates to stress the war on terrorism and the economy.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - As part of its campaign to address climate change, the White House on Wednesday unveiled a website to serve as a one-stop location for the enormous amount of climate data housed at different federal agencies. The initiative to make the information easily accessible to communities, researchers and industries trying to adapt to global warming is the White House's latest move to deliver on a pledge President Obama made in June: to use his executive authority to confront climate change in light of congressional inaction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2013
J. David Kuo, 44, an evangelical Christian and former top official of President George W. Bush's faith-based initiative who later accused the administration of failing to live up to the president's promise of "compassionate conservatism," died Friday of cancer. Kuo's family announced his death Saturday on his Facebook page. "Last night at 10:25 our beloved David found his reward in heaven, with his savior Jesus Christ," the family wrote. "With a peaceful last breath, he won his courageous 10-year battle against brain cancer.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - As he prepares for more spending battles with Congress, President Obama plans to nominate Sylvia Mathews Burwell, head of the Walmart Foundation, as his next budget director, the White House said Sunday. A former deputy budget director in the Clinton administration, Burwell would replace Jeffrey Zients, acting head of the White House Office of Management and Budget. Obama is scheduled to announce her appointment Monday morning. If confirmed by the Senate, Burwell would be one of the few top female aides to Obama, joining senior advisor Valerie Jarrett.
NATIONAL
January 6, 2011 | By Katherine Skiba, Washington Bureau
Tina Tchen has plenty of qualities that made her a logical choice as First Lady Michelle Obama's top aide, but here's one that will come in especially handy: Tchen sleeps only four hours a night. Appointed Wednesday as chief of staff to the first lady, Tchen cited a "biological-clock thing" in explaining why she sleeps only from 2 to 6 a.m. "I have the good fortune to not need a lot of sleep," she said. "That's been a great gift. " The other 20 hours a day, Tchen earns a reputation as "driven," "indefatigable" and "phenomenally brilliant," according to friends and colleagues.
NATIONAL
July 21, 2010 | By Christi Parsons, Tribune Washington Bureau
The young minister's alarm goes off at 6 a.m., time for his own devotional and the one he will send to the president of the United States. This particular morning, Joshua DuBois meditates on the disciple Peter's first letter to the early church. The text he prays over and e-mails to Barack Obama half an hour later is about something else. It's a private start to the day for the president and the pastor, a spiritual BlackBerry session they guard carefully. Hours later, they meet in a public setting, when the president arrives to give a speech at a community center.
NATIONAL
December 2, 2009 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Mark Silva
The couple who made it past Secret Service protection to hobnob with the president at a state dinner last week say "the truth will come out" about their night at the White House, and they insist they were not party crashers. Tareq and Michaele Salahi told their story Tuesday in their first television appearance, as a House committee prepared for a hearing on what has developed into an increasingly embarrassing incident for the White House. The couple said in an interview on NBC's "Today" that they were "shocked and devastated" by accusations that they showed up uninvited and talked their way past security.
NEWS
October 5, 1996 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former assistant in the White House office of personnel security has told Senate investigators that she and others in the office were aware that some past Republican appointees were included on lists of FBI background files they requested. Mari Anderson, whose statement was released Friday by the Senate Judiciary Committee, said some files on past GOP officials were obtained despite recognition of the names, including former Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
January 15, 2000 | ELIZABETH JENSEN and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In Hollywood and in Washington, White House officials Friday mounted an aggressive defense of their efforts to get more anti-drug themes on television, rejecting claims that surfaced earlier this week that their program has amounted to censorship and payola. Despite the flurry of criticism, officials said they are confident that they can continue to use network programming to get their message out.
NATIONAL
May 9, 2009 | Peter Nicholas
An Obama administration official who took the blame for the Air Force One flyover in Lower Manhattan last month gave his resignation Friday, after a White House investigation into a botched photo op that frightened New Yorkers with its echo of the Sept. 11 attacks. Louis Caldera, a former California assemblyman from Los Angeles, wrote to the president that he could no longer perform effectively as head of the White House Military Office.
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