Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWhite House Spokesman
IN THE NEWS

White House Spokesman

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 13, 1988 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater called it "a damned outrage" Tuesday that his predecessor, Larry Speakes, had attributed fake quotes to President Reagan on at least three occasions. Fitzwater, clearly concerned about his own reputation for truthfulness, blistered Speakes at his daily news briefing for having "cast aspersions on the presidency and on my position."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 10, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
The White House said on Monday that there has been some progress in discussions to resolve Egypt's political crisis, but insisted concrete actions were needed. As protests in Cairo prepared to enter the third week, President Obama told reporters there has been progress among those negotiating what lies ahead for Egypt. "Obviously Egypt has to negotiate a path and they're making progress," said Obama after completing a speech to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Briefing reporters later, White House spokesman Robert Gibbs said the United States "policy toward Egypt is we watch and we are strongly encouraging the process of meaningful change ?
Advertisement
NEWS
January 13, 1987 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan on Monday named a replacement for Larry Speakes, the chief spokesman for the White House. He gave the job to Marlin Fitzwater, who served as deputy presidential press secretary before his most recent job as press secretary to Vice President George Bush. "It's obvious that the President wanted an anchorman type--thin, with a lot of hair," said the red-nosed, cigar-smoking Fitzwater, who is distinctly not thin and quite bald.
NEWS
February 10, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli and Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Marquette, Mich., and Los Angeles President Obama, who earlier Thursday called for an orderly transition in Egypt, will meet with his national security team to discuss the situation when he returns to the White House tonight, officials said. Aboard Air Force One, Obama watched President Hosni Mubarak tell Egypt that he was staying in office until elections in September, but would transfer some authority to his new vice president, Omar Suleiman. Mubarak's televised speech was less than many protesters in Tahrir Square had sought.
NEWS
August 8, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton huddled with his top foreign policy advisers Monday to search for ways to use a bloody Croatian army offensive as a springboard for a new diplomatic effort to end the ethnic conflict in neighboring Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
President Vytautas Landsbergis said Friday he had received U.S. assurance of support for his Baltic republic, which is trying to buck a crackdown by Soviet troops. In Washington, President Bush told a news conference he had spoken with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and called for a peaceful solution in the Baltics. The Soviet actions in Lithuania had prompted the Administration to reconsider a planned summit meeting between President Bush and Gorbachev in Moscow Feb. 11-13.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Iraqi government rejected all dates offered by President Bush for talks in Baghdad and made it clear Saturday that, in any case, Iraq does not want to talk about the same things that Washington does. A communique from the Revolutionary Command Council, Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's inner circle, accused Bush of trying to impose a schedule on Iraq. The statement said that, in talks with Washington, Iraq would not discuss any U.N.
NEWS
January 28, 1986
A White House spokesman denied published reports that a senior Soviet KGB major-general defected to the United States last spring, and intelligence experts questioned the reports. An FBI spokesman said: "We know of nobody who fits that description." Asked to comment on a report in a news magazine about the purported high-ranking defector, White House spokesman Larry Speakes said: "This KGB defector described in U.S. News & World Report is not so."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
By George, It's George: George Burns showed up at the White House Tuesday saying he wanted to meet President Bush, and he got his wish. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said Burns, 95, had performed at a Chamber of Commerce function Monday night. "He just wanted to come in and meet the President. They shook hands and exchanged pleasantries," Fitzwater said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1987
There is no reason why the press should be so hungry to destroy the President, as White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater angrily declared. President Reagan is doing an adequate job destroying himself; he doesn't need any outside help. MAUREEN MAMAN Los Angeles
NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
The White House said on Monday that there has been some progress in discussions to resolve Egypt's political crisis, but it insisted definitive actions were needed. As protests in Cairo prepared to enter the third week, President Obama told reporters there has been progress among those negotiating what lies ahead for Egypt. "Obviously Egypt has to negotiate a path and they're making progress," Obama said after completing a speech to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Briefing reporters later, White House spokesman Robert Gibbs said the United States "policy toward Egypt is we watch and we are strongly encouraging the process of meaningful change ... transpiring and resulting in a more open and transparent society.
NEWS
February 2, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times, Reporting from Los Angeles
The White House on Wednesday warned the Egyptian government that it should not instigate violence among demonstrators in Cairo and should stop if it had a role in the dangerous confrontations. Speaking to reporters, White House spokesman Robert Gibbs condemned the wave of violence among demonstrators in Cairo. He repeated that the United States wanted to see democratic changes in Egypt and that it was in favor of a transition of power. President Obama, who has spoken about the situation in settings that precluded questions, will be available to the media later this week, Gibbs said.
NEWS
January 31, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
The White House on Monday called for negotiations among a broad cross-section of the Egyptian people, including opposition groups, to help resolve the current political crisis. As anti-government demonstrations in Egypt prepared to enter their second week, White House spokesman Robert Gibbs told reporters that the Obama administration continued to support the human rights demands by Egyptian protesters including freedom of association, assembly and speech. “Those must be addressed in a substantive way by the Egyptian government,” Gibbs said.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By Christi Parsons and Michael Muskal, Washington Bureau
Robert Gibbs, the media face of the Obama presidency, will leave his post as White House spokesman and will boost the president's reelection drive from outside the West Wing. The departure of Gibbs as the chief spokesman has been rumored for weeks, but it was unclear whether he would stay in another job within the administration or whether he would leave the White House to work for Obama from outside. Gibbs confirmed this morning that he will leave sometime in early February, after the president delivers his State of the Union speech to the new Congress.
NEWS
December 15, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
The Senate on Wednesday voted to take up the arms limitation pact with Russia, President Obama's top foreign policy objective in the lame-duck congressional session. In a 66-32 vote, the Senate agreed to begin debate on the treaty, which requires 67 votes for ratification. Eight Republicans voted with Democrats to open discussion. Some Republicans had previously indicated they would stall deliberations by insisting every word be read aloud. The move prompted a sharp retort from the White House.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas and Tom Hamburger, Tribune Washington Bureau
Festering tensions between the White House and liberal activists flared Tuesday, with presidential Press Secretary Robert Gibbs scolding what he called "the professional left" for its vocal objections to President Obama's record. In an interview with the Hill newspaper, the president's chief spokesman voiced disdain for liberal critics who've likened Obama to former President George W. Bush. "These people ought to be drug tested," Gibbs said. "They will be satisfied when we have Canadian healthcare and we've eliminated the Pentagon.
NEWS
March 18, 1988 | Associated Press
President Reagan and his wife Nancy will remain at the White House during the weekend to give the First Lady a chance to recuperate from laryngitis, White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said Thursday. White House physician John Hutton "recommended she take it easy" and advised the couple to cancel their regular weekend visit to the Camp David, Md., presidential retreat, Fitzwater said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1985
White House spokesman Larry Speakes announced that it would be a "promotion" for Margaret Heckler to move from Health and Humam Services secretary to ambassador to Ireland. This "promotion" involves a $12,000-a-year pay cut and giving up a position managing a $330-million budget. Is this the Reagan Administration's alternative to comparable worth? Maybe we could get President Reagan to consider a "promotion." ROBIN COLMAN North Hollywood
NATIONAL
July 30, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas and Janet Hook, Tribune Washington Bureau
If Ronald Reagan was the classic Teflon president, Barack Obama is made of Velcro. Through two terms, Reagan eluded much of the responsibility for recession and foreign policy scandal. In less than two years, Obama has become ensnared in blame. Hoping to better insulate Obama, White House aides have sought to give other Cabinet officials a higher profile and additional public exposure. They are also crafting new ways to explain the president's policies to a skeptical public.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2009 | Mark Silva
It is the Internet rumor that has been discredited but will not die: President Obama is not a naturally born U.S. citizen and therefore constitutionally is not qualified to serve. This week, months after the allegations first cropped up on the Web and talk radio, the White House and Hawaii officials addressed the rumor -- with the state's health director saying that she had reviewed the records in question and found that they verified Obama was born in Hawaii.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|