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NEWS
December 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
Scientists say they have new evidence that a recently discovered gene plays an important part in determining an unborn baby's sex. The idea is that a fetus who inherits the gene will be male and one without it will develop into a female. The scientists studied rare females who had inherited the gene. In two of those cases, the gene was found to have been altered, which apparently made it defective.
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NEWS
December 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
Scientists say they have new evidence that a recently discovered gene plays an important part in determining an unborn baby's sex. The idea is that a fetus who inherits the gene will be male and one without it will develop into a female. The scientists studied rare females who had inherited the gene. In two of those cases, the gene was found to have been altered, which apparently made it defective.
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NEWS
December 23, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Geneticists have discovered a gene that determines the sex of a human embryo, a finding that offers an unprecedented window into the earliest stages of development. The gene appears to start a complex chain reaction of hormones that eventually leads to the development of a male. Without the gene, the embryo begins a different pathway and grows into a female. The gene is located on the Y chromosome, which is part of the inborn genetic code of men but not women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1990 | DANIEL Q. HANEY, Haney is a science writer for the Associated Press.
On the corner of Dr. David Page's desk rests a foot-high stack of newly published genetics textbooks. They matter-of-factly describe the location of the sex-determining factor, the single gene that settles the question of whether a fertilized egg will be a boy or a girl. The gene was Page's discovery. Its rapid rise to the status of accepted wisdom is hardly a surprise, for when he revealed it at a news conference, the announcement was a major event in the world of genetics.
NEWS
June 26, 1987 | Associated Press
Research with mice indicates that it may be possible to treat fetuses infected with the AIDS virus in the womb, a preliminary finding that scientists said could lead to decreased symptoms and prolonged life for the youngest victims of the deadly disease. Researchers said Thursday that they infected mice in the womb with a retrovirus distantly related to the one that causes AIDS and were able to delay nervous system symptoms of the resulting disease with an antiviral drug.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Individuals infected with the AIDS virus have much higher concentrations of the virus in their circulation than previously thought, according to studies by researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles and the University of Washington in Seattle published in today's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1990 | DANIEL Q. HANEY, Haney is a science writer for the Associated Press.
On the corner of Dr. David Page's desk rests a foot-high stack of newly published genetics textbooks. They matter-of-factly describe the location of the sex-determining factor, the single gene that settles the question of whether a fertilized egg will be a boy or a girl. The gene was Page's discovery. Its rapid rise to the status of accepted wisdom is hardly a surprise, for when he revealed it at a news conference, the announcement was a major event in the world of genetics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1999
Researchers have for the first time transformed human cells into tumors by genetic manipulation, a team from the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Boston reports in today's Nature. It has been relatively easy to convert rodent cells into tumors in the laboratory, but human cells have previously resisted such attempts. The team achieved their success by altering just three genes, demonstrating that production of cancer is controlled by a short, defined genetic process.
NEWS
February 15, 1992
Edwin C. Whitehead, 72, a philanthropist and developer of scientific equipment who with his father founded Technicon Corp. in 1939. The company created a more accurate and easier-to-read electrocardiograph, the first device to automate the reading of microscope slides and the first portable respirator. Whitehead sold Technicon to Revlon in 1980 for $400 million and established an investment firm.
SCIENCE
September 3, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The human Y chromosome -- the DNA chunk that makes a man a man -- has lost so many genes over time that some scientists have suspected it might disappear in 10 million years. But a new study says it'll stick around. Researchers found no sign of gene loss over the last 6 million years, suggesting the chromosome is "doing a pretty good job of maintaining itself," said researcher David Page of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Individuals infected with the AIDS virus have much higher concentrations of the virus in their circulation than previously thought, according to studies by researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles and the University of Washington in Seattle published in today's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
December 23, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Geneticists have discovered a gene that determines the sex of a human embryo, a finding that offers an unprecedented window into the earliest stages of development. The gene appears to start a complex chain reaction of hormones that eventually leads to the development of a male. Without the gene, the embryo begins a different pathway and grows into a female. The gene is located on the Y chromosome, which is part of the inborn genetic code of men but not women.
NEWS
June 26, 1987 | Associated Press
Research with mice indicates that it may be possible to treat fetuses infected with the AIDS virus in the womb, a preliminary finding that scientists said could lead to decreased symptoms and prolonged life for the youngest victims of the deadly disease. Researchers said Thursday that they infected mice in the womb with a retrovirus distantly related to the one that causes AIDS and were able to delay nervous system symptoms of the resulting disease with an antiviral drug.
NEWS
September 3, 1996 | Associated Press
Researchers have found the apparent hiding place of a gene that promotes the most common form of diabetes, one that affects 15 million Americans. Scientists believe several genes play a role in susceptibility to type 2 diabetes, but they haven't identified any gene yet. The location suggested by the new study is the second to be implicated. Scientists hope the genes will reveal the biology of diabetes and lead to drugs for treatment and prevention.
NEWS
October 31, 1995 | From Associated Press
The search for schizophrenia genes has received a boost from new studies that suggest researchers are looking in the right place. Several teams of researchers have found evidence supporting the idea that a gene making people susceptible to schizophrenia lies somewhere in a particular region of Chromosome 6. The initial suggestion made news in May, when scientists published an analysis of genetic material from 186 Irish families.
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