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Whiteworth Towne Paulsen

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BUSINESS
November 25, 1990 | JIM SCHACHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a certain kind of business known as a schlock operation. Its merchandise is schlock-- Yiddish for "knocked about," second-rate, fire-sale stuff. But the term also suggests a way of doing business, regardless of the merchant's ethnicity. The standard operating procedures are seat-of-the-pants. Ethics are checked at the door. Such operations and operators are staples of commerce, moving goods no one else will sell and serving a clientele that big business ignores.
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BUSINESS
November 25, 1990 | JIM SCHACHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a certain kind of business known as a schlock operation. Its merchandise is schlock-- Yiddish for "knocked about," second-rate, fire-sale stuff. But the term also suggests a way of doing business, regardless of the merchant's ethnicity. The standard operating procedures are seat-of-the-pants. Ethics are checked at the door. Such operations and operators are staples of commerce, moving goods no one else will sell and serving a clientele that big business ignores.
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BUSINESS
October 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Alleged Con Man Dies Before Trial: Bernard Mass of Anaheim Hills, who was indicted by a federal grand jury in April on 23 counts of fraud, died last week, just days before the case was set for trial in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. The 47-year-old Mass was accused of bilking Coast Savings out of $1 million by submitting false invoices to obtain advances against a line of credit for Whiteworth/Towne-Paulsen, the Gardena pharmaceutical firm he controlled.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Applied Circuit Technology Inc. reported its first quarterly earnings in 21 months, posting net income of $1.65 million for the second quarter of its fiscal 1987. The earnings, however, did not come from continuing operations. Instead, they include a gain of $1.5 million from the sale of ACT's computer electronics division and leasehold improvements at its former corporate headquarters and electronics manufacturing facility in Anaheim.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1991 | JIM SCHACHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Anaheim Hills businessman who associates say has been responsible for the failure of a score of businesses was arrested Monday on charges of bilking Los Angeles-based Coast Savings out of $1 million. A federal indictment charges Bernard Mass, 47, with 23 counts of fraud in a scheme that allegedly involved submitting false invoices from a Gardena pharmaceutical company he controlled to obtain advances against a line of credit from a Coast subsidiary.
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