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Whitman

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2011 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
Former Republican gubernatorial candidate Meg Whitman said Tuesday that her party must change its approach on immigration if it wants to be successful in California. "My view is that the immigration discussion, the rhetoric the Republican Party uses, is not helpful; it's not helpful in a state with the Latino population we have," Whitman said during a brief interview following a speech at a George W. Bush Institute conference on the economy. "We as a party are going to have to make some changes, how we think about immigration, and how we talk about immigration.
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BUSINESS
March 30, 2011 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles
Meg Whitman, the former EBay Inc. chief executive who lost the California governor's race in November, may soon take a new job at a marquee Silicon Valley investment firm. Whitman is joining Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers as a strategic advisor, according to Reuters. The venture capital firm is known for its investments in the tech, biotechnology and green energy industries, with interests in Google Inc., Twitter Inc., Flipboard Inc., Zynga Inc., Bloom Energy and dozens of other companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2011 | By Seema Mehta and Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Meg Whitman vastly outspent Jerry Brown on virtually every facet of the 2010 contest for governor. From focus groups and consultants to private planes and lavish fundraisers, Whitman campaigned like the billionaire she is, spending $177 million to Brown's $36 million. But in one key area ? television advertising ? the Democrat nearly kept pace with Whitman during the final sprint of the campaign, allowing him to make his case to voters before they cast ballots, according to financial disclosure reports filed Monday.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2011 | Walter Hamilton and Tiffany Hsu
Five months after the controversial ouster of its chief executive, Hewlett-Packard Co. announced Thursday that four members of its board of directors were stepping down. They are being replaced by five newcomers including Meg Whitman, the former EBay Inc. chief executive who was defeated in her bid to be elected California governor last November. The board of HP, which is the world's largest computer maker, drew widespread criticism last August for its handling of a scandal involving Mark Hurd, its once highly respected CEO. The board forced Hurd to resign amid accusations of sexual harassment and expense-account abuse.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2011 | Reuters
Hewlett-Packard Co. said Thursday that four directors are leaving as a company shake-up continues under new Chief Executive Leo Apotheker. HP, still reshaping itself after the recent ouster of CEO Mark Hurd, also named five new directors, including Meg Whitman, the former CEO of EBay Inc. who lost to Jerry Brown in the November election for governor of California. The other new directors are Shumeet Banerji, CEO of Booz & Co; Gary Reiner, former chief information officer of General Electric Co.; Patricia Russo, former CEO of Alcatel-Lucent; and Dominique Senequier, CEO of AXA Private Equity.
OPINION
December 25, 2010
Obama at halftime Re "Obama has strong first-half finish," Dec. 20 President Obama has indeed had some impressive accomplishments so far, but his greatest political disappointment is his not being able even to begin, let alone pass, comprehensive immigration reform. With the new Congress taking over for the rest of the president's term, any attempt at needed broad reform would be dead on arrival. If the bipartisan reform attempt under the Bush administration could not succeed with presidential backing, what chance would Obama have with the GOP shouting, "It's amnesty," "Support the rule of law," "Arrest the illegals" and, "Defeat Obama"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2010 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Meg Whitman's former lead spokesman is starting to speak up about the candidate's losing race for governor. And he's shouting about the need for Republicans to stop the demagoguery over illegal immigration. Senior advisor Rob Stutzman isn't exactly spilling his guts about the former EBay chief's spectacular thumping. The billionaire lost to low-budget Jerry Brown by 54% to 41%, despite spending a record $160 million-plus, roughly $142 million of it her own money. But the veteran Republican strategist is blaming the mini-landslide size of Whitman's loss on some ugly dust-ups over illegal immigration that alienated Latinos from the GOP. On Nov. 2, a record 22% of the California electorate was Latino.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2010 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
Last month's political contest between Jerry Brown and Meg Whitman mobilized more California voters than any gubernatorial election since 1994, according to final election results certified Friday by Secretary of State Debra Bowen. The Nov. 2 election drew a 59.6% turnout, Bowen said. "The race for governor and some controversial propositions drew the highest number of people to the polls in five gubernatorial elections," she said. Just as a sweep of statewide offices by Democrats in California ran counter to GOP gains nationally, the Golden State's voters did not exhibit the "enthusiasm gap" that dampened turnout in other states.
OPINION
November 19, 2010
It is particularly rich ? pardon the expression ? that Meg Whitman this week tied up one of the remaining loose ends of her gubernatorial campaign by agreeing to pay her former housekeeper $5,500. Whitman, you'll remember, spent more of her own money in her race for governor than any candidate for any office in American history. And she lost. There are plenty of explanations for that, but one has particular salience: her dramatic rejection by Latinos, California's fastest-growing, soon-to-be-majority ethnic group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2010 | By Seema Mehta and Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Meg Whitman and Carly Fiorina framed themselves as the fresh face of the Republican Party, two leaders whose business savvy and gender had equipped them to help craft a new path for the shrinking GOP in blue California. For months, the national spotlight shone brightly on the two former chief executives, whose wealth made them formidable threats to their opponents. But their dual losses on election day ? Whitman by 12 percentage points and Fiorina by 9 ? have raised doubts about their future viability in politics, particularly in California.
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