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Whitney Museum Of American Art

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Whitney Museum of American Art has chosen Adam Weinberg, a former senior curator at the museum, as its new director. Weinberg, currently the director of the Addison Gallery of Art at Phillips Academy in Andover, Mass., was approved by the museum's board of directors on Thursday. He will replace Maxwell Anderson, who resigned after five years in the post in May, citing differences with the board.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The view from a moving car framed by a window is a snapshot many travelers have locked in their memories. Lee Friedlander, well known for his idiosyncratic style of photography, has applied his old tricks to incorporate alternative visuals of those hours-long adventures traversing back roads and highways. Friedlander hit the road on a years-long trek across 50 states capturing snippets of Americana as seen through a thin layer of tinted cover glass. The resulting multidimensional photographs are the subject of his recently released book "America by Car. " In it is a revealing portrait of America as a beautiful, kitschy, gritty and diverse landscape.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic
Three months after Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art acquired Edward Ruscha's "Chocolate Room," a conceptual installation that covers walls of an entire room with shingle-like sheets of chocolate-coated paper, New York's Whitney Museum of American Art has received a gift of 456 photographs and prints by the L.A.-based artist. The donation, announced Friday, makes the Whitney the principal repository of Ruscha's photographic works.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
After trying for almost two decades, the Whitney Museum of American Art has cleared a hurdle in its quest to add to its famed Marcel Breuer-designed building on Madison Avenue, winning the approval of the city Landmarks Preservation Commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
After trying for almost two decades, the Whitney Museum of American Art has cleared a hurdle in its quest to add to its famed Marcel Breuer-designed building on Madison Avenue, winning the approval of the city Landmarks Preservation Commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Two employees of the Whitney Museum of American Art have been charged with stealing $880,000 over a two-year period by voiding ticket sales and pocketing the cash, Manhattan Dist. Atty. Robert Morgenthau said Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2003 | Diane Haithman
In another example of cultural belt-tightening, Manhattan's Whitney Museum of American Art confirmed Tuesday that it will scrap its plans to build an expansion, designed by Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas, due to financial problems. The ambitious project, which unofficial estimates have pegged at $200 million, will be jettisoned as the museum seeks instead to build its $45-million endowment.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1998 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
There's something quaint about the newly opened fifth-floor expansion of the Whitney Museum of American Art--something quaint and hopeless. Quaint because the handsome galleries for the museum's permanent collection cleverly evoke an earlier, simpler time, when Manhattan's art history stood in for America's; and hopeless because--well, who could possibly believe in that anymore?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The view from a moving car framed by a window is a snapshot many travelers have locked in their memories. Lee Friedlander, well known for his idiosyncratic style of photography, has applied his old tricks to incorporate alternative visuals of those hours-long adventures traversing back roads and highways. Friedlander hit the road on a years-long trek across 50 states capturing snippets of Americana as seen through a thin layer of tinted cover glass. The resulting multidimensional photographs are the subject of his recently released book "America by Car. " In it is a revealing portrait of America as a beautiful, kitschy, gritty and diverse landscape.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1997 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
Everybody loves to hate the Whitney Biennial. Why? That depends on whom and when you ask. Established in 1932 by the Whitney Museum of American Art's founder, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, as an annual survey of new work by living American artists, and changed to a biannual in 1973, this exhibition is invariably trounced by critics regardless of who curates it, how they do it or who's in it. Nonetheless, it remains one of the most talked-about shows on the art circuit.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Two employees of the Whitney Museum of American Art have been charged with stealing $880,000 over a two-year period by voiding ticket sales and pocketing the cash, Manhattan Dist. Atty. Robert Morgenthau said Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic
Three months after Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art acquired Edward Ruscha's "Chocolate Room," a conceptual installation that covers walls of an entire room with shingle-like sheets of chocolate-coated paper, New York's Whitney Museum of American Art has received a gift of 456 photographs and prints by the L.A.-based artist. The donation, announced Friday, makes the Whitney the principal repository of Ruscha's photographic works.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Whitney Museum of American Art has chosen Adam Weinberg, a former senior curator at the museum, as its new director. Weinberg, currently the director of the Addison Gallery of Art at Phillips Academy in Andover, Mass., was approved by the museum's board of directors on Thursday. He will replace Maxwell Anderson, who resigned after five years in the post in May, citing differences with the board.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2003 | Diane Haithman
In another example of cultural belt-tightening, Manhattan's Whitney Museum of American Art confirmed Tuesday that it will scrap its plans to build an expansion, designed by Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas, due to financial problems. The ambitious project, which unofficial estimates have pegged at $200 million, will be jettisoned as the museum seeks instead to build its $45-million endowment.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1998 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
There's something quaint about the newly opened fifth-floor expansion of the Whitney Museum of American Art--something quaint and hopeless. Quaint because the handsome galleries for the museum's permanent collection cleverly evoke an earlier, simpler time, when Manhattan's art history stood in for America's; and hopeless because--well, who could possibly believe in that anymore?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1997 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
Everybody loves to hate the Whitney Biennial. Why? That depends on whom and when you ask. Established in 1932 by the Whitney Museum of American Art's founder, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, as an annual survey of new work by living American artists, and changed to a biannual in 1973, this exhibition is invariably trounced by critics regardless of who curates it, how they do it or who's in it. Nonetheless, it remains one of the most talked-about shows on the art circuit.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Keith Haring, whose distinctive, cartoon-like drawings in subway stations caught the attention of art dealers who made him famous miles away from those dank underground tunnels, died Friday of AIDS. He was 31. Haring, who was diagnosed as having AIDS more than a year ago and was active in AIDS fund-raising, fell ill with flu-like symptoms in January and died early Friday at his Manhattan home.
MAGAZINE
July 13, 2003 | David Weddle, David Weddle last wrote for the magazine about comedy.
"How did you do on your final exam?" I asked my daughter. Her shoulders slumped. "I got a C." Alexis was a film studies major completing her last undergraduate year at UC Santa Barbara. I had paid more than $73,000 for her college education, and the most she could muster on her film theory class final was a C? "It's not my fault," she protested. "You should have seen the questions. I couldn't understand them, and nobody else in the class could either. All of the kids around me got Cs and Ds."
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