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Who S Afraid Of Virginia Woolf Play

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who's afraid of a big, bad three-hour play? Not Thom B. Hill and Sheryl Donchey. Hill, dean of fine and performing arts at Santa Ana College, and Donchey, who chairs the theater department, are starring in a campus production of "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," Edward Albee's grimly funny case study of the damage done when academic life goes sour.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
WHAT a dump. The rickety table in a grimy little Manhattan office is littered with coffee cups and old newspapers. Steam pipes hiss in the old Midtown building and the windows are caked with dirt. The scene is eerily quiet on this winter afternoon, but then a booming, howling voice shatters the calm. Down the hall, actors are rehearsing for the national tour of Edward Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf," and Kathleen Turner, cast as Martha, is ripping into her husband, George.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE
With sunlight streaming into the living room of his suite at a West Hollywood low-profile/high-celebrity hotel, Edward Albee ruminated on what it's like to direct his own plays. "It's a new experience each time," he said. "This is only the second time I've directed 'Virginia Woolf.' I did it on Broadway in 1976 with Colleen Dewhurst and Ben Gazzara. It went very nicely, got good press. This time, I'm learning more about the play."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2002 | SUSAN KING
Friends ask actress Ellen Crawford and her husband, actor Michael Genovese, how they can play the roles of the venomous George and Martha in Edward Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" without wanting to kill each other. Crawford just smiles every time she's asked that question. "We have said it's like having really good sex," says Crawford, who appears on NBC's top-rated dramatic series, "ER," as nurse Lydia Wright. "The exhilaration--both physically and emotionally ...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2002 | SUSAN KING
Friends ask actress Ellen Crawford and her husband, actor Michael Genovese, how they can play the roles of the venomous George and Martha in Edward Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" without wanting to kill each other. Crawford just smiles every time she's asked that question. "We have said it's like having really good sex," says Crawford, who appears on NBC's top-rated dramatic series, "ER," as nurse Lydia Wright. "The exhilaration--both physically and emotionally ...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
WHAT a dump. The rickety table in a grimy little Manhattan office is littered with coffee cups and old newspapers. Steam pipes hiss in the old Midtown building and the windows are caked with dirt. The scene is eerily quiet on this winter afternoon, but then a booming, howling voice shatters the calm. Down the hall, actors are rehearsing for the national tour of Edward Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf," and Kathleen Turner, cast as Martha, is ripping into her husband, George.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who's afraid of a big, bad three-hour play? Not Thom B. Hill and Sheryl Donchey. Hill, dean of fine and performing arts at Santa Ana College, and Donchey, who chairs the theater department, are starring in a campus production of "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," Edward Albee's grimly funny case study of the damage done when academic life goes sour.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE
With sunlight streaming into the living room of his suite at a West Hollywood low-profile/high-celebrity hotel, Edward Albee ruminated on what it's like to direct his own plays. "It's a new experience each time," he said. "This is only the second time I've directed 'Virginia Woolf.' I did it on Broadway in 1976 with Colleen Dewhurst and Ben Gazzara. It went very nicely, got good press. This time, I'm learning more about the play."
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