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BUSINESS
April 1, 2010 | By Troy Wolverton
You probably have a mobile phone with a Bluetooth radio in it, and you may have a Wi-Fi network as well. Soon, you could be using a third wireless networking technology in your house. It's called ZigBee, and it eventually might find its way into more devices than Wi-Fi and Bluetooth combined. In the near term, you're likely to see it show up in the smart meters that utilities have begun to use and in the remote controls of high-end televisions. In the not-too-distant future, you could be using ZigBee networking to control the lights in your home, monitor your elderly parent's health or turn off your air conditioner during periods of peak energy use when no one's home.
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BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | David Lazarus
As far as corporate notices go, they don't get much creepier than this recent alert from Verizon Wireless. The company says it's "enhancing" its Relevant Mobile Advertising program, which it uses to collect data on customers' online habits so that marketers can pitch stuff at them with greater precision. "In addition to the customer information that's currently part of the program, we will soon use an anonymous, unique identifier we create when you register on our websites," Verizon Wireless is telling customers.
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BUSINESS
September 9, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Before flying off to the Democratic National Convention in North Carolina last week, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa touted the news that Los Angeles International Airport now offers free Wi-Fi service in its terminals. It's good news for travelers, but LAX -- the nation's third-busiest airport -- is not breaking new ground. Several large airports across the country already offer free wireless Internet, including Mineta San Jose International Airport, San Francisco International Airport and Long Beach Airport.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
T-Mobile announced that it will sell iPads capable of connecting to LTE networks at the same price as iPads that can only connect to Wi-Fi networks, essentially offering customers a $130 discount on the Apple tablets. The Seattle-based carrier said the special prices would be available for a limited time starting Saturday. Customers can get the discounted iPads, as well as other tablets, for nothing down followed by 24 monthly payments that vary depending on the tablet chosen. Under this promotion, for example, customers can get the LTE 16-gigabyte iPad mini with Retina display, which normally retails for $529, for a total of $398.88.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The social network is testing a project called Facebook Wi-Fi that provides free Internet access to customers who have a Facebook account and "check-in" at participating businesses. Businesses such as retail stores and coffee shops near Facebook's California headquarters in Menlo Park are using a router provided free of charge to test out the Wi-Fi program, a Facebook spokeswoman told The Times. When customers come in to a business' location and attempt to access its Wi-Fi network, they can do so by simply using Facebook's "Check In" feature.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Despite the fear of identity theft and threats from computer viruses, the use of public wireless Internet has jumped by 240% in the last 12 months, a new survey has found. The top log-in sites were coffee shops and restaurants (75%), hotels (54%) and airports (38%), according to an online survey of 377 people by the nonprofit Identity Theft Resource Center in partnership with Private Wifi, a firm that develops online protection software. Still, Internet users are aware of the risks of using public Wi-Fi.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Most major airlines already allow passengers to use their portable devices from takeoff to landings, under a new policy from the Federal Aviation Administration. Now Southwest Airlines is going a step further by letting them connect to the plane's wireless Internet service throughout the flight, even when the plane is on the tarmac. Southwest says it is the only airline to offer gate-to-gate Wi-Fi because it relies on satellite-based connectivity provided by Row 44, a Westlake Village subsidiary of Global Eagle Entertainment Inc. Many other airlines, such as American, United, Delta and Alaska, rely on Wi-Fi services that use air-to-ground towers similar to cellphones, which are switched on only when a plane is above 10,000 feet.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Southwest Airlines, the nation's biggest carrier of domestic passengers, doesn't provide its customers with high-tech entertainment systems or in-flight movies, like many of its competitors. But the Dallas-based airline will soon offer professional football and baseball games, at least for passengers who travel with Wi-Fi-enabled laptops or other portable devices. Row 44, the in-flight Internet provider for Southwest, last week announced a deal with the NFL Network to provide live streaming football games, video highlights and analysis for passengers who pay the $5 Internet connection fee. Row 44 has cut a deal to broadcast Major League Baseball games as well.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2009 | Hugo Martin
A pair of high-tech companies is launching the first free, ad-supported, in-flight wireless network, clearing the way for passengers to shop for Paula Abdul's Reach for the Stars Bracelet from the Home Shopping Network or an automatic pet feeder from SkyMall while soaring at 30,000 feet. To be fair, the free wireless network, dubbed SkyTown Center, also will let travelers watch live television, play games and check out information about their destination city. But the real goal of the service -- offered under a partnership between the airborne Wi-Fi provider Row 44 and the online media company JiWire -- is to squeeze a few more dollars from big-spending business travelers.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Microsoft Surface likely will launch this fall. It also likely will launch without 3G or 4G connectivity. On Monday, Microsoft announced the Surface, which has wowed observers, the press and consumers. But Microsoft has been very vague about many of Surface's most important details, among them, the price, battery life, and whether or not it was limited to Wi-Fi connectivity. Now a report says the tablet will debut intially as Wi-Fi only. Bloomberg reported that the Surface will launch without the ability to connect to any mobile networks, citing two sources familiar with the matter.
SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
Few dates on the baseball calendar can match a home opener for pomp, ceremony and excitement. Or, in the case of Dodger Stadium on Friday afternoon, for long lines, crowded concourses and Wi-Fi snafus. But for the legions of blue-and-white-clad loyalists, what happened in the stands likely rated as nothing more than minor inconveniences compared to what happened on the field, where sloppiness fueled an 8-4 loss to the division-leading San Francisco Giants. On the reserved level, some in the sellout crowd of 53,493 waited in concession lines for as long as 45 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Joe Flint
The dinosaurs are getting WiFi. Time Warner Cable has hooked up the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County with wireless Internet access. The WiFi, available starting Thursday, is free to Time Warner Cable subscribers while nonsubscribers will receive two hours of complimentary access. Installing WiFi into the 100-year-old building was no small task, according to Mike Roudi, Time Warner Cable's senior vice president of corporate development. The walls are thick, and the museum has many small rooms.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
Among the hundreds of gadgets, games and apps at January's Consumer Electronics Show, few had the sizzle of James Buch's gleaming silver hunk of hardware. That's because the device is a barbecue grill - one that's Wi-Fi enabled, voice activated and chatty in a Siri-ish way. "When the Lynx Smart Grill is ready for the food, it sends you a text," said Buch, chief executive of Lynx Professional Grills of Downey. "When it's time to flip the food, it sends you a text. When the food is ready, it sends you a text.
NEWS
February 4, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama announced plans on Tuesday to bring high-speed Internet more quickly to the nation's public schools, pledging to make sure students in the United States have every advantage that "some child in South Korea has right now. " After all, Obama told a crowd at a school in Adelphi, Md., “We shouldn't give that kind of competitive advantage over to other countries.” "In a country where we expect free Wi-Fi with our...
BUSINESS
February 2, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
In most luxury hotels, if you want wireless Internet access, you are going to have to pay. That trend may be changing. Sort of. Loews Hotels & Resorts announced last month that it will offer free Wi-Fi at all 18 of its hotels, including the ones in Hollywood, Santa Monica and San Diego. If you want faster Internet to connect up to eight devices, however, that will cost $19.95 per day. In the past, many luxury hotels offered only one choice: Wi-Fi at a hefty price. Previously, Loews charged about $15 to $20 per day for the slower Internet that it now offers free of charge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
In the 20 years since the Northridge earthquake, the state's freeway bridges have been strengthened. A new generation of hospitals, schools and university buildings designed to better withstand a massive quake has risen. But for all those strides, changes in society and technology have left California vulnerable in other ways. The 1994 Northridge disaster occurred in an era before Wi-Fi computer access and at a time when cellphones were still something of a rarity. Seismic safety experts say that if a huge quake strikes the state now, both services would be interrupted - possibly for days.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Greyhound Lines, the bus service that launched nearly 100 years ago, is shifting into the 21st century by adding free onboard entertainment and wireless Internet services. The Dallas-based company announced Monday the launch of an onboard system that allows passengers to surf the Web, watch movies, listen to music and play games on their own electronic devices. The service is beginning on the company's premium Greyhound Express service between Dallas and Houston as a six-month pilot program, with an expansion to other areas expected later this year.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2010 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
A comfy mattress and a hot breakfast are still important to hotel guests, but free wireless Internet access is the most desired amenity, according to a new survey of 53,000 travelers. The survey by J.D. Power & Associates found that free Wi-Fi was the most important for guests in nearly every segment of the hotel industry, from luxury hotels to budget lodging. As most travelers know, not every hotel offers free Wi-Fi. In fact, the survey found that the most expensive hotels were the least likely to offer it free of charge.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
The U.S. Department of Transportation issued the biggest fine Tuesday for violation of full fare disclosure rules against a Brazilian airline. The Rio de Janeiro-based airline GOL was ordered to pay $250,000 for violating rules adopted in 2011 to ensure passengers know the full cost of their tickets, including fees and taxes, before buying tickets. The airline also violated Department of Transportation rules that require foreign and domestic carriers to post a contingency plan for handling lengthy delays on an airport tarmac.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Most major airlines already allow passengers to use their portable devices from takeoff to landings, under a new policy from the Federal Aviation Administration. Now Southwest Airlines is going a step further by letting them connect to the plane's wireless Internet service throughout the flight, even when the plane is on the tarmac. Southwest says it is the only airline to offer gate-to-gate Wi-Fi because it relies on satellite-based connectivity provided by Row 44, a Westlake Village subsidiary of Global Eagle Entertainment Inc. Many other airlines, such as American, United, Delta and Alaska, rely on Wi-Fi services that use air-to-ground towers similar to cellphones, which are switched on only when a plane is above 10,000 feet.
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