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July 27, 2010
April 2010 — WikiLeaks releases a video showing a 2007 Apache helicopter attack in Iraq that killed two Reuters news agency employees and 10 other civilians. February 2008 — It posts documents detailing Bank Julius Baer of Zurich's activities in the Cayman Islands, raising questions about alleged money laundering and tax evasion. The bank went to court to shut down WikiLeaks' website, but was ultimately unsuccessful. September 2008 — In the midst of the U.S. presidential election, a group of hackers post content from Sarah Palin's personal Yahoo e-mail account on WikiLeaks, including screenshots of e-mail messages and address book contacts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
If you've ever wanted to read a 20,000-word story about Edward Snowden, you'll get your chance pretty soon. The former National Security Agency contractor -- and currently world-famous intelligence leaker -- has been granting more and more interviews since he absconded with agency documents and sought asylum in Russia last year after sharing those documents with journalists. Idolized and reviled by many, one of Snowden's newest appearances in the spotlight will come in a long narrative story about his leak (and life thereafter)
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OPINION
January 30, 2011 | Doyle McManus
Is the era of WikiLeaks over? It's been less than a year since the underground organization made its first big splash with the release of thousands of U.S. military files from Afghanistan. And it's been only two months since WikiLeaks began releasing documents from its trove of 251,287 U.S. diplomatic cables. But with fewer than 3,000 cables released, the newspapers that were given access to the database have found that it has already reached the point of diminishing returns.
OPINION
February 5, 2014 | Patt Morrison
When you've been working since you were 8, as Alyssa Milano has, it takes a special kind of role to get you really excited. Using your birthday to raise money for clean water in Ethiopia, for instance. Or hunkering down with the beleaguered in Kosovo and Angola, as a UNICEF goodwill ambassador. Or getting help for African women and children with AIDS. Or her latest - creating "Hacktivist," a four-issue graphic novel/comic book whose heroes run a world-beating social media company by day and practice world-beating social activism by night.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
DreamWorks Studios has begun filming the “The Fifth Estate,” a movie about the controversial founder of WikiLeaks. The film, which will be released in the U.S. on Nov. 15 through Disney's Touchstone label, began principal photography last week in Iceland and is filming this week in Berlin. The film also will shoot in Belgium, where it will receive a tax credit. Directed by Bill Condon, "The Fifth Estate" stars Benedict Cumberbatch as Julian Assange and Daniel Brühl as Daniel Domscheit-Berg, as well as Laura Linney, Anthony Mackie and David Thewlis.
NATIONAL
November 28, 2012 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - Pfc. Bradley Manning could testify for the first time Thursday at pretrial proceedings in the case in which he's accused of leaking hundreds of thousands of secret U.S. government documents to the website WikiLeaks. Manning is charged with providing the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks with reams of sensitive diplomatic cables and classified war logs from Afghanistan and Iraq while he was based in Baghdad as an intelligence analyst in 2009 and 2010. The hearings this week at Ft. Meade, outside Washington, have centered on whether Manning was treated lawfully while in pretrial confinement for nine months beginning in July 2010 at the Marine Corps base in Quantico, Va. Lawyers for Manning -- who could face life in prison if convicted of the most serious of 22 counts against him -- have argued that all of the charges should be dismissed because the conditions in which he was held constituted illegal punishment.
OPINION
July 26, 2010
Predictably, this week's release of thousands of classified documents by WikiLeaks — which also provided them to the New York Times, Germany's Der Spiegel and the Guardian in London — has fired up those who believe secrecy fosters national security and who shudder at the idea of journalists rummaging through classified material. Typical was the comment from tiresome Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.). WikiLeaks, he maintained, is armed with "an ideological agenda implacably hostile to our military and the most basic requirements of our national security."
NATIONAL
February 26, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. -- A military judge refused Tuesday to dismiss the charges against the Army private accused of treason for providing reams of government secrets to WikiLeaks, saying numerous pretrial delays were necessary because of the “voluminous amount of classified information.” The ruling now clears the way for Pfc. Bradley Manning to appear in a military courtroom here Thursday and probably plead guilty to some of the lesser charges against...
OPINION
August 5, 2010
For years, members of Congress have tied themselves in knots trying to figure out how to pass a "shield law" that allows journalists to protect the identities of sources without giving anything to journalists whom those same members do not like or appreciate. Lawmakers recognize the value of protecting sources when they disclose the Pentagon Papers or details about Watergate, but they're less keen on those who reveal corporate secrets or classified documents about wars they support. Now, with a shield law poised for approval, the WikiLeaks disclosures of classified material from Afghanistan have reinforced the timidity that has delayed this legislation for too long.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2008 | Henry Weinstein
A Swiss bank on Wednesday withdrew a federal lawsuit that had sparked an Internet furor by shutting down a muckraking website that publishes leaked documents alleging business and government misdeeds. The dismissal was requested by Julius Baer & Co. of Zurich, which had sued Wikileaks.org after the site posted internal company documents raising questions about alleged money laundering and tax evasion schemes at the bank's Cayman Islands branch. U.S. District Judge Jeffrey S. White, citing privacy laws and the threat of identity theft for the bank's customers, initially ordered the main entrance to the site shut down.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan
In its own Hollywood way, "The Fifth Estate" is quite an ambitious film. It wants to create a viable portrait of Julian Assange, the wildly controversial founder of WikiLeaks, dramatize the significant but complex questions his work raises and surround both of those themes with the kind of personal dramas so beloved by mainstream films. The surprise in this film, starring actor-of-the-moment Benedict Cumberbatch as Assange and Daniel Brühl as his associate Daniel Domscheit-Berg and directed by Bill Condon, is not that all of these goals are met - that would be too much to expect - but which ones are successful and which ones prove to be beyond everyone's grasp.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2013 | By Noel Murray
Star Trek Into Darkness Paramount, $29.99; Blu-ray, $39.99/$54.99 Available on VOD beginning Sept. 10 Although it's not as much fun as the 2009 "Star Trek" reboot, J.J. Abrams' sequel has the same major asset as its predecessor: a winning cast that ventures through space with the kind of amiable collegiality that made the original TV series such a joy. This time out, Chris Pine (as Kirk), Zachary Quinto (as Spock), Zoe Saldana (as Uhura) and Simon Pegg (as Scotty) are joined by the always-magnificent Benedict Cumberbatch, playing a mysterious, superhuman villain looking to destroy the credibility of the Federation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
The story of Pfc. Bradley Manning is a grand personal tragedy with a small potential for a happy ending. On Wednesday, a military judge sentenced Manning to 35 years in prison for giving WikiLeaks some 750,000 classified military documents. On Thursday, Manning announced that he will begin living as a woman, and his name will be Chelsea Manning. Those two stark facts may seem unrelated, but they are deeply intertwined. “As I transition into this next phase of my life,” Manning wrote in a statement that Savannah Guthrie read on the "Today" show, "I want everyone to know the real me. I am Chelsea Manning.
NATIONAL
August 21, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - A military judge will tell Army Pfc. Bradley Manning at 10 a.m. EDT today how long he must serve in prison for illegally leaking a vast trove of classified U.S. military and diplomatic materials to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. Army Col. Denise Lind will deliver the sentence. She found Manning guilty last month of six counts of violating the Espionage Act and mishandling classified material, but she acquitted him of a more serious charge of aiding the enemy. Manning's supporters, who consider him a hero for exposing government secrets, plan a vigil outside the gates of Ft. Meade, where the court-martial has taken place, and have announced an evening rally outside the White House.
NATIONAL
August 21, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, MD. - In his crisp blue uniform, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning rose to his feet in a small crowded courtroom Wednesday morning and was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. Manning, who could have been sentenced to 90 years, stood at attention and showed no emotion as the military judge, Army Col. Denise Lind, delivered the sentence. As soon as Lind left the bench, Army guards quickly rushed Manning out of the courtroom.
NATIONAL
August 21, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, the junior intelligence analyst who came to signify a new era of massive security breaches in the Internet age, was sentenced Wednesday to 35 years in prison for leaking a vast trove of military and diplomatic secrets to WikiLeaks. He could be eligible for release in seven years. So ended a high-profile case that sparked a heated debate about whether the Obama administration is prosecuting whistle-blowers rather than protecting them, a dispute fueled by a flood of recent disclosures documenting the secret surveillance of Americans' telephone and Internet data.
NATIONAL
December 10, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The former head of the brig where self-styled whistle-blower Pfc. Bradley Manning was incarcerated testified Monday that she was surprised when the base commander asked for advance notice of orders she planned to give in the case, as a pretrial hearing went into its 10th day. Manning, who is charged with giving classified information to the website WikiLeaks, is seeking to have charges against him dismissed on the grounds that he was subjected to...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Rene Perez Joglar, a.k.a. Residente, outspoken lead singer of the multiple Latin Grammy-winning, politically activist band Calle 13, is teaming up with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on a songwriting session that's intended to strike a blow for free speech and against censorship, "disinformation and media manipulation," according to a statement released by Calle 13's publicist. Perez told his 5 million Twitter followers that he met with Assange on Wednesday night at the Ecuadorean Embassy in London, where Assange has been confined for several months while law authorities seek to extradite him to Sweden in a sexual assault case.
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