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NATIONAL
August 13, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - He was late for meetings, and once curled in a fetal position on a storage room floor and clutched his head, a knife at his feet. He carved the words "I want" into a chair. Another time, he pounded his fists and flipped over a table of computers before he was wrestled into submission. And in April 2010, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning emailed his sergeant a mug shot of himself wearing makeup, dark lipstick and a flowing blond wig. "This is my problem," he wrote in the email.
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NATIONAL
August 12, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - Lawyers for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning sought to convince a military judge Monday to give him less than the maximum prison term, arguing that the former intelligence analyst was mentally unstable and that his commanders should not have sent him to Iraq. Manning, who was convicted last month of espionage and mishandling classified data for leaking 700,000 military and diplomatic cables and other classified materials to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks, faces up to 90 years in prison.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2013 | By David Horsey
Edward Snowden has escaped the limbo of the transit lounge at Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport and now, in the style of former Vice President Dick Cheney, the fugitive leaker is hunkered down in an undisclosed location somewhere in Russia. Snowden's father, Lon Snowden, has publicly thanked Russian President Vladimir Putin for keeping his son out of the clutches of American authorities who want to prosecute Snowden for revealing details of U.S. cyber spying operations.
NEWS
August 1, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
Ft. MEADE, Md. - A career U.S. diplomat testified Thursday that Army Pfc. Bradley Manning's unauthorized release of classified material horrified officials at the State Department and jeopardized relationships with U.S. allies overseas, even as Julian Assange, founder of WikiLeaks, complained that President Obama has “betrayed” his campaign pledge to protect whistle-blowers. Elizabeth Dibble, principal deputy U.S. assistant secretary of State for Near Eastern affairs, was called to testify about the damage to the State Department after Manning in 2010 gave the anti-secrecy organization WikiLeaks more than 700,000 diplomatic cables, combat reports and other highly classified data.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
Bradley Manning may be one of the most fascinating and controversial characters in contemporary American history, and Hollywood is taking notice. Manning, who is in the sentencing phase of a trial at Ft. Meade, Md., for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified military and diplomatic documents to WikiLeaks, is already an important figure in two movies out this year and at the center of another in development. On Tuesday, a military judge acquitted Manning of the most serious charge of "aiding the enemy" but found him guilty of multiple other charges, for which he could face up to 136 years in prison.
NATIONAL
July 31, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - A former top Army officer who oversaw the Pentagon's secret intelligence gathering testified Wednesday that Pfc. Bradley Manning's disclosures to WikiLeaks "affected our ability to do our mission" and endangered U.S. ground troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. Retired Army Brig. Gen. Robert A. Carr, formerly at the Defense Intelligence Agency and now an executive at Northrop Grumman, was the government's first witness in the sentencing phase of Manning's court-martial.
NATIONAL
July 31, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. -- Retired Army Brig. Gen. Robert A. Carr, the government's first witness in the sentencing phase of Pfc. Bradley Manning's court-martial, testified Wednesday that Manning's disclosures to WikiLeaks endangered U.S. ground troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. Carr, who oversaw the Pentagon's secret intelligence gathering but is now an executive at Northrop Grumman, said what Manning did “affected our ability to do our mission.” On Tuesday, Manning was found guilty of violating the Espionage Act but was acquitted of the more serious charge of aiding the enemy by making the material available to Al Qaeda and other terrorist  groups.
NATIONAL
July 30, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. -- Army Pfc. Bradley Manning was acquitted Tuesday of the most serious charge in the largest breach of classified U.S. secrets in the nation's history, possibly escaping a life sentence after being vilified for more than three years as a traitor to his country but championed by others as a hero whistle-blower who released proof of government misconduct in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Army Col. Denise Lind found Manning not guilty of giving intelligence to the enemy, but convicted him of espionage and other charges after deliberating the case on Friday evening, Sunday and Monday.
NATIONAL
July 30, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - Army Pfc. Bradley Manning was convicted Tuesday of violating the Espionage Act and faces up to 136 years in prison, but his acquittal on the even more serious charge of aiding the enemy was hailed as a victory for the press and the Internet against the government's crackdown on leaks of classified information. Manning's leak of more than 700,000 State Department cables, terrorism detainee assessments, combat logs and videos was the largest breach of classified secrets in U.S. history.
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