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NATIONAL
July 26, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - Young, naive, gay and good-intentioned, wanting to save lives in a combat zone, feeling responsible for U.S soldiers and Iraqi citizens and hoping they all make it home safely - that is the true Pfc. Bradley Manning, his chief defense attorney asserted Friday near the end of his Army court-martial. David Coombs, a civilian and a veteran, offered those descriptions in his closing arguments as the judge in Manning's trial prepared to begin deliberating on whether the 25-year-old soldier is guilty of espionage and aiding the enemy in providing more than 700,000 confidential records, videos and other material to WikiLeaks.
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NATIONAL
July 26, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - Young, naive and well-intentioned, wanting to save lives in a combat zone, feeling responsible for U.S. soldiers and Iraqi citizens and hoping they all make it home safely - that is the true Bradley Manning, his lawyer asserted Friday as deliberations began on the fate of the 25-year-old private. Army Col. Denise Lind, the judge who is hearing the case without a jury at Manning's request, must decide whether Manning is guilty of espionage and aiding the enemy in providing more than 700,000 confidential records, videos and other material to WikiLeaks.
NATIONAL
July 25, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. -- Bradley Manning purposely joined the Army and deployed to Iraq to use his extensive computer skills to gain access to a trove of protected secrets that he knew would assist terror organizations in their efforts to attack the United States, the chief prosecutor in Manning's military court martial said Thursday. “WikiLeaks was merely the platform that Pfc. Manning used to make sure all the information was available to the world, including the enemies of the United States,” said Maj. Ashden Fein in closing arguments at the end of Manning's trial here.
NATIONAL
July 25, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - Bradley Manning purposely joined the Army and deployed to Iraq to parlay his extensive computer skills into disclosing a treasure trove of protected U.S. secrets that he knew would assist terrorist organizations in their efforts to attack the United States, the chief prosecutor in Manning's military court-martial said Thursday. "WikiLeaks was merely the platform that Pfc. Manning used to make sure all the information was available to the world, including the enemies of the United States," Army Maj. Ashden Fein said in his closing argument near the end of Manning's trial here.
NATIONAL
July 18, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - The judge in the court martial of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning on Thursday turned down a defense request to dismiss the most serious charge against him -- aiding the enemy -- setting in motion closing arguments in the first of a pair of high-profile cases against government leakers. The decision by Col. Denise Lind means that Manning, 25, who provided the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks with more than 700,000 classified war documents, State Department cables, combat videos and other items, could ultimately be sentenced to life in a military brig with no possibility of parole if the judge finds him guilty of aiding the enemy.
NATIONAL
July 18, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - The judge in the court-martial of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning refused to dismiss the most serious charge against him Thursday, dealing a blow to his hope of emerging from the trial as a whistle-blower concerned about government abuse rather than a disgruntled soldier driven to assist Al Qaeda. The decision by Col. Denise Lind upholding the charge of aiding the enemy signaled that she may be preparing to find Manning guilty. This could mean the 25-year-old - who gave the anti-secrecy organization WikiLeaks more than 700,000 U.S. intelligence files, videos and diplomatic cables - could spend the rest of his life in a military brig with no chance of parole.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
The new trailer for DreamWorks' "The Fifth Estate" takes us to the heart of the WikiLeaks debate. When Julian Assange (played by Benedict Cumberbatch) leaked a video of a U.S. military helicopter firing on unarmed civilians in Baghdad, was he arming the world with information we deserved to know, or was he threatening American security? And what about the subsequent leaks, including more than 90,000 military documents about the war in Afghanistan? Was that information the world really needed to know?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By Dana Ferguson
We've seen the Julian Assange documentary. Now it's time for the WikiLeaks drama. The trailer for director Bill Condon's "The Fifth Estate," Dreamworks Studios' fictonalized telling of the story of WikiLeaks founder Assange, debuted Wednesday, ahead of the film's Oct. 11 premiere. PHOTOS: Summer Sneaks 2013 The film, adapted from the book by and told from the point of view of Assange's friend Daniel Domscheit-Berg (Daniel Brühl), follows the journey of Assange (Benedict Cumberbatch)
WORLD
July 16, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden officially applied for temporary asylum in Russia on Tuesday, his attorney and the Wikileaks organization announced. The application is for temporary refuge, not permanent political asylum, according to human rights activists familiar with his case. “It is a compromise step as Russia doesn't want to utterly spoil its relations with the United States as tense as they are,” said Olga Kostina, head of the rights organization Soprotivleniye.
WORLD
July 5, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
NSA leaker Edward Snowden has sent out appeals for asylum to six more countries, WikiLeaks reported Friday, in a sign of the marooned fugitive's mounting desperation in the face of international indifference to his plight. Snowden remains trapped in a diplomatic no-man's land at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport, lacking documents that would allow him to enter Russia or travel to a country willing to damage relations with Washington to give him refuge. The 30-year-old former contract worker for the National Security Agency has been on the run for more than a month since telling journalists about massive U.S. efforts to track telephone conversations and Internet traffic around the world.
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