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WORLD
July 2, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - With his prospects for refuge narrowing, Edward Snowden withdrew an application for asylum in Russia, apparently deciding that he couldn't abide by President Vladimir Putin's insistence that he stop leaking U.S. secrets, a Kremlin spokesman said Tuesday. "True, Snowden did voice a request to stay in Russia," presidential spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters. "At the same time, having found out yesterday about Russia's position outlined by President Putin … he rejected his intention and his request to get a chance to stay in Russia.
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WORLD
July 2, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Edward Snowden has withdrawn an application for asylum in Russia, apparently deciding that he couldn't abide by President Vladimir Putin's insistence that he stop leaking U.S. secrets, a Kremlin spokesman said Tuesday. “True, Snowden did voice a request [to be allowed] to stay in Russia,” presidential spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters. “At the same time, having found out yesterday about Russia's position outlined by President Putin ... he rejected his intention and his request to get a chance to stay in Russia.” The Kremlin spokesman reiterated Putin's position, announced Monday, that the former U.S. National Security Agency contractor must stop activities "aimed at damaging our American partners" if he wanted to be granted asylum in Russia.
WORLD
July 1, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW - Edward Snowden plaintively appealed Monday from his diplomatic limbo in Moscow for relief from what he described as President Obama's use of "deception" and the "bad tools of political aggression" in pressuring other countries to deny him asylum. In a statement posted on WikiLeaks' website, the fugitive former National Security Agency analyst accused Obama of seeking to make him stateless. Snowden's first communication in more than a week exuded the strain of being trapped in a diplomatic no man's land and seeing earlier offers of refuge being rescinded.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Rene Perez Joglar, a.k.a. Residente, outspoken lead singer of the multiple Latin Grammy-winning, politically activist band Calle 13, is teaming up with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on a songwriting session that's intended to strike a blow for free speech and against censorship, "disinformation and media manipulation," according to a statement released by Calle 13's publicist. Perez told his 5 million Twitter followers that he met with Assange on Wednesday night at the Ecuadorean Embassy in London, where Assange has been confined for several months while law authorities seek to extradite him to Sweden in a sexual assault case.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Leftie publisher O/R Books is covering the Bradley Manning trial for a book slated to appear in October, " The United States vs. PFC Bradley Manning: A Graphic Account From Inside the Courtroom . " The chronicler is Clark Stoeckley -- he's a WikiLeaks supporter, not an impartial observer, and his courtroom artist-style drawings have an undertone of sympathy for Manning. Manning's court-martial began Monday in Fort Meade, Md. Three years ago, Manning was arrested on suspicion of leaking more than 700,000 Iraq and Afghanistan battlefield reports and State Department cables when he was a 22-year-old Army intelligence analyst.
NATIONAL
June 5, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
FT. MEADE, Md. - Bradley Manning's former Army supervisor described him Wednesday as a highly competent computer whiz who could easily get around secret passwords to retrieve information about enemy terrorist cells. "He indicated to me he was very fluent in computers, that he spoke their language, and that there was nothing he could not do on a computer," said Jihrleah Showman, a former Army specialist who served as Manning's team leader in Iraq. Showman testified in Manning's court-martial on charges he aided the enemy by passing thousands of classified documents to the WikiLeaks website.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. -- Army Pfc. Bradley Manning's decision to release classified U.S. government secrets came in late December 2009, when he was new to Iraq and learned to his horror that a family of five was grievously injured by a roadside bomb. David Coombs, defense attorney for the 25-year-old enlistee, said at the opening Monday of Manning's long-awaited court martial that on Christmas Eve that year a vehicle with two adults and three children pulled to the side of the road to let an Army convoy pass, only to hit a roadside bomb.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Richard Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - Government prosecutors, hoping to win a life sentence for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning in the WikiLeaks scandal, opened their case Monday in the court-martial against the young enlistee with a slide show that began with an ominous email he sent in May 2010. He wrote, “If you had unprecedented access to classified networks 14 hours a day 7 days a week for 8+ months, what would you do?” What Manning did, Army Cpt. Joe Morrow alleged in the long-awaited trial at Ft. Meade, was download and send to WikiLeaks more than 700,000 classified government documents, including highly sensitive State Department cables and assessments of terror captives, and prisoner interrogation videos to confidential U.S. evaluations of foreign allies.
NATIONAL
June 1, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Army Pfc. Bradley Manning has already confessed to mishandling classified information for sending hundreds of thousands of U.S. intelligence documents to the WikiLeaks website, including reports of airstrikes that killed civilians, assessments of terrorism suspect captives, and diplomatic cables. On those charges alone, he could spend 20 years in prison. But on Monday, the 25-year-old Army computer whiz who lost his faith in the government over the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan will go on trial on charges of aiding the enemy and putting American lives at risk, and for that he is facing a possible life sentence.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
"We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks" may be a documentary, but director Alex Gibney gives the film the feel of a propulsive espionage techno-thriller played out in the real world. The movie is in some sense two films in one. It's partly a study of the well-known Julian Assange, who captured the world's attention when his WikiLeaks website made volumes of sensitive U.S. government material available online, sparking a firestorm of controversy over secrecy and freedom of information in the digital age. But viewers may be less familiar with Bradley Manning, the low-level Army intelligence analyst who provided Assange with his most daring cache of documents and is soon to begin a court-martial stemming from those activities.
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