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FOOD
September 2, 1998
Charles Perry's "The Twilight of the Nesselrode" (Forklore, July 15) brought back memories for me, and I wanted to let you know that Nesselrode was alive and well here in Southern California during the 1940s and '50s. It was called Nesselrode Bula and was one of the most popular ice cream flavors (and the most expensive, since it also had rum added to it) in a chain of upscale ice cream parlors called Wil Wright's. The ice cream was chock full of the candied fruits described in the piece; perhaps the rum was a Wil Wright addition (there actually was a Wilbur Wright)
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SCIENCE
March 19, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A concept developed by the Wright brothers may make future airplanes more maneuverable, more fuel efficient and able to carry heavier loads, NASA researchers said Wednesday. In their original flier, the brothers warped the wings to make turns rather than using flaps such as those on modern planes.
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BUSINESS
June 7, 1989 | From Times wire service s
The government said today it would sell Short Brothers Ltd., the ailing Belfast aircraft and missile maker, to the Canadian aerospace company Bombardier Inc. for 30 million pounds, about $47 million. The announcement ended months of speculation over who would buy the state-owned company, which is Northern Ireland's largest employer, after the government said it planned to privatize it. The Northern Ireland Office said the government will inject 372 million pounds ($584 million)
OPINION
December 21, 2003 | Peter Garrison, Flying magazine columnist Peter Garrison once flew to Japan in his home-built airplane.
Years ago, on a camping trip to the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park with a group of schoolchildren, I built a model glider of balsa and paper. Its wings spanned 3 feet or so. Across the table from me, another parent busied herself stuffing and mounting a seabird whose carcass had been found on the shore of the nearby Salton Sea. The aim of both activities was to entertain and instruct the children, whose average age was about 6, during the hot midday "down time."
OPINION
December 21, 2003 | Peter Garrison, Flying magazine columnist Peter Garrison once flew to Japan in his home-built airplane.
Years ago, on a camping trip to the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park with a group of schoolchildren, I built a model glider of balsa and paper. Its wings spanned 3 feet or so. Across the table from me, another parent busied herself stuffing and mounting a seabird whose carcass had been found on the shore of the nearby Salton Sea. The aim of both activities was to entertain and instruct the children, whose average age was about 6, during the hot midday "down time."
SCIENCE
March 19, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A concept developed by the Wright brothers may make future airplanes more maneuverable, more fuel efficient and able to carry heavier loads, NASA researchers said Wednesday. In their original flier, the brothers warped the wings to make turns rather than using flaps such as those on modern planes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1992 | MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
E. Hamilton Lee, who was flying planes just 13 years after the Wright Brothers took flight at Kitty Hawk, celebrated his 100th birthday Saturday by flying as co-pilot on a DC-3 from Ontario to Van Nuys Airport. "Good, good, good," but "a little rough," said Lee, known in aviation circles as the dean of airline pilots, as he emerged from the plane, his trademark cigar dangling from his mouth. Lee, the first civilian pilot to fly the U.S.
NEWS
December 7, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The late Ambassador M. Larry Lawrence was a college student in March 1945--the same month the Democratic campaign contributor claimed he was on a torpedoed merchant marine ship, the New York Post reported. Citing documents from Wilbur Wright Junior College in Chicago, the Post said Lawrence was taking at least 12 hours of classes per week between January and June 1945. That would contradict the claims that helped gain Lawrence, who died in 1996, burial at Arlington National Cemetery.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1989 | From Times wire services
The British government today signed over the state-owned aircraft and guided missile maker Short Brothers to the Canadian group Bombardier. Bombardier, which makes subway rolling stock and small passenger jets, paid $48 million for Shorts. The government gave the Montreal firm $1.25 billion in aid for the privatization takeover.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2003 | From Associated Press
It won't be dedicated until today, but a sculpture of the Wright brothers and their Flyer at the start of the first manned, powered flight already has become a magnet for children -- and adults -- who like their history hands-on. Nancey Atkinson looped the strap of her binoculars around Wilbur Wright's neck Saturday, then stood near the wingtip of the airplane being piloted by his brother, Orville, and told a friend with a camera: "Get the guy! I want all of them in there!"
FOOD
September 2, 1998
Charles Perry's "The Twilight of the Nesselrode" (Forklore, July 15) brought back memories for me, and I wanted to let you know that Nesselrode was alive and well here in Southern California during the 1940s and '50s. It was called Nesselrode Bula and was one of the most popular ice cream flavors (and the most expensive, since it also had rum added to it) in a chain of upscale ice cream parlors called Wil Wright's. The ice cream was chock full of the candied fruits described in the piece; perhaps the rum was a Wil Wright addition (there actually was a Wilbur Wright)
BUSINESS
June 7, 1989 | From Times wire service s
The government said today it would sell Short Brothers Ltd., the ailing Belfast aircraft and missile maker, to the Canadian aerospace company Bombardier Inc. for 30 million pounds, about $47 million. The announcement ended months of speculation over who would buy the state-owned company, which is Northern Ireland's largest employer, after the government said it planned to privatize it. The Northern Ireland Office said the government will inject 372 million pounds ($584 million)
NEWS
December 12, 1997 | From Associated Press
The body of Ambassador M. Larry Lawrence was exhumed from Arlington National Cemetery on Thursday, a week after Republicans questioned his claims of wartime service that helped win permission for burial there. Pentagon spokesman Kenneth Bacon said the Lawrence family handled the details of removing Lawrence's body and moving it to a new burial site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1990
I would like to ask your help in persuading the Board of Supervisors to realize the importance of naming the new airport terminal after Eddie Martin. Martin, 88, is a pioneer aviator who started Orange County Airport in 1922. He is still living in Santa Ana today. His pilot's license is signed by Wilbur Wright. I do not need to go into all of the accomplishments of Martin, as they are a matter or record. There are many of us who would like to see the new terminal building at the airport named the Eddie Martin Terminal.
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