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Wildest Dreams

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1999
The worst-case Jan. 1, 2000, scenarios that people think about--but don't expect in their wildest dreams to happen--do in an NBC movie called "Y2K."
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SPORTS
January 14, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Everything is going just as Colin Kaepernick planned. All the way back in fourth grade, he in a school letter that he would like to one day be the quarterback of the San Francisco 49ers. And lo and behold, that's just what happened. In that same letter, Kaepernick also predicted that he would make his coach look like a genius for giving him the job late in the season, set new postseason records for longest rushing touchdown by a quarterback and most rushing yards by a quarterback in a game, and that he would start a social media sensation by kissing his right biceps after touchdowns.
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NEWS
February 10, 1991
Yay, ABC! Thanks so very much for "New Kids on the Block at MGM Studios: Wildest Dreams" (Jan. 25). Someone, somewhere made a great decision in making the show. You'll never be sorry where New Kids on the Block are involved. Michelle Parkinson, Anaheim
SPORTS
May 29, 2012 | By Gary Klein
USC tennis player Steve Johnson extended his winning streak to 72 matches and won his second consecutive NCAA singles title Sunday at Athens, Ga. Johnson, in the near-court in the above video, defeated Kentucky's Eric Quigley, 6-4, 6-4, to finish the season 32-0. Last week Johnson, a senior from Orange, helped the Trojans win their fourth consecutive NCAA team title. “Coming into college, I was thinking I'd be happy if could get one title,” Johnson said in a phone interview.
SPORTS
January 10, 1987
In reference to Mike Downey's column (Jan. 4), specifically to his derogation of the Cleveland Browns, I would like to suggest 10 ways that Mr. Downey could possibly obtain a Pulitzer Prize: 1. By gunpoint. 2. In his wildest dreams. 3. By changing his name to Mother Teresa. 4. If the prize is ever awarded by National Lampoon. 5. By theft. 6. If the prize is ever awarded by lottery. 7. If they added a category for mediocrity. 8. If his family is appointed to the awards committee.
SPORTS
April 6, 1991
Some of the sentiments around town regarding the release of Fernando Valenzuela are ridiculous. To insinuate that Fernando was used, abused and then cast aside is absurd. I will agree, Fernando's dedication to his profession and to the fans that idolized him has been nothing short of inspirational during the past decade. But one should not forget that the Dodger organization and the game of baseball has taken a youngster from a poverty environment and introduced him and his family to a way of life far beyond their wildest dreams.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1995 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Since sweeps are over, it's time for the networks to burn off the programs that weren't quite bad enough to be rejected immediately after their pilots but weren't good enough to merit space on the regular season schedule. ABC and Fox introduce a couple of laugh-free sitcoms this weekend. Both offer stand-up comics playing parents taking a hard look at what it means to no longer be footloose and fancy free; both feature protagonists who work in the media.
SPORTS
January 14, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Everything is going just as Colin Kaepernick planned. All the way back in fourth grade, he in a school letter that he would like to one day be the quarterback of the San Francisco 49ers. And lo and behold, that's just what happened. In that same letter, Kaepernick also predicted that he would make his coach look like a genius for giving him the job late in the season, set new postseason records for longest rushing touchdown by a quarterback and most rushing yards by a quarterback in a game, and that he would start a social media sensation by kissing his right biceps after touchdowns.
SPORTS
December 25, 1997 | Associated Press
Jim Fassel, who in his rookie season led the New York Giants from last to first in the NFC East, was voted NFL coach of the year by the Associated Press on Wednesday. Fassel collected 20 votes from a nationwide panel of 48 sportswriters and broadcasters. He doubled the total of runner-up Marty Schottenheimer of Kansas City.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2012 | By Matt Stevens, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Gary Yamauchi, 67, owns Tri-Star Vending, one of the largest independent vending companies in the Los Angeles area, with yearly sales of about $2 million. He's also an Alhambra councilman, a position that earns him $875 a month. "In my wildest dreams, as a kid, I never had thoughts of becoming an elected official," but he takes pride in doing hands-on community service, said Yamauchi, who also has served as the city's mayor. "If somebody has a pothole in their front yard or a tree is falling down, they call me. I get it done in two days.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2010 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
After discovering the frozen remains of British explorer George Mallory on Mt. Everest in 1999, mountaineer and author Conrad Anker, 47, returned to the world's tallest mountain in 2007 with Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Anthony Geffen to retrace the steps of Mallory, the first adventurer believed to have reached the summit, in 1924. "The Wildest Dream: Conquest of Everest," their National Geographic Entertainment film narrated by Liam Neeson, opened in theaters this weekend. Other than "because it's there" — George Mallory's famous answer to the question of what motivated him — why do people risk their lives to climb Everest?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2010
'The Wildest Dream: Conquest of Everest' MPAA rating: PG for thematic elements involving hardships of climbing and some historical smoking images Running time: 1 hour, 33 minutes Playing: the Landmark, West Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The most famous comment about the reason for climbing Mt. Everest was made by a man who never made it to the top. Or did he? That would be British mountaineer George Mallory, who replied, "Because it's there," when asked why he wanted to conquer the highest peak in the world. Mallory looked on his quest as "the wildest dream," and an absorbing new documentary called "The Wildest Dream: Conquest of Everest" deals with the climber's fate and his legacy in an unexpected combination on ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2009 | Erik Himmelsbach
Self-mythologizing is as much a part of rock as the 15-minute guitar solo. Tom Waits knows the drill: He's been messing with our heads for a full generation. Like Bob Dylan, he has proven a canny master of disguise, creating an impenetrable wall to keep his life from a discerning public. But more like David Bowie than Dylan, Waits has utilized exaggerated theatricality as his mask of choice. He emerged in 1971 as a flophouse poet and beat-influenced boozer. When that conceptual well ran dry, he became a sonic junk man, a cockeyed carnival barker shilling opaque shards of sound.
OPINION
February 18, 2006 | MEGHAN DAUM
FOR ALL OF US who carry on a tortured romance with Internet voyeurism, there's a new flame in town. Zillow.com, which launched Feb. 8 and attracted so many users that the site crashed in less than 12 hours, is as close as we've come to a virtual epicenter of the American consciousness. Granted, it doesn't let us secretly probe the brains of friends and strangers to learn their innermost thoughts, but almost: We can access the ultimate metaphor for their aspirations -- their property values.
SPORTS
May 29, 2012 | By Gary Klein
USC tennis player Steve Johnson extended his winning streak to 72 matches and won his second consecutive NCAA singles title Sunday at Athens, Ga. Johnson, in the near-court in the above video, defeated Kentucky's Eric Quigley, 6-4, 6-4, to finish the season 32-0. Last week Johnson, a senior from Orange, helped the Trojans win their fourth consecutive NCAA team title. “Coming into college, I was thinking I'd be happy if could get one title,” Johnson said in a phone interview.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1993
The letter to the editor (Feb. 28) from Martin Blume, deputy director of Brookhaven National Laboratory, in defense of the national laboratories was timely and appropriate. But the really difficult issue here, as far as I am concerned, is the "brain drain" our country would experience if the laboratories were allowed to fall by the wayside because of ignorance on the part of the general public and their equally ignorant, I fear, elected government officials. One of the aspects of the national labs that makes them so unique--so important--is the store of truly gifted individuals who have worked for them in many different capacities.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2005 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
Matt Ward pines for the glory days of free-form radio like a veteran of the 1960s -- his new album, "Transistor Radio," is a highly personal homage to that endangered sensibility -- and the singer-songwriter-guitarist's musical touchstones include Louis Armstrong and the Carter Family. So connected is Ward with the currents of last century's music and its transmission on radio that it's easy to forget that he's barely into his 30s.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1999
The worst-case Jan. 1, 2000, scenarios that people think about--but don't expect in their wildest dreams to happen--do in an NBC movie called "Y2K."
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