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Wildlife Biologist

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2001 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some people speed through the suburbs and see only pricey stucco homes and tangled freeways wrapped around the foothills of Southern California. Biologist Kevin Crooks surveys the same landscape and envisions lifelines for wildlife. Crooks studies an Orange County map and imagines corridors where coyotes can glide at night. He views a mundane highway bridge as the perfect conduit for wandering mule deer.
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SPORTS
November 17, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When fire sweeps across Southern California's brush lands, deer, coyotes and foxes run. Birds fly. Smaller, slower creatures hole up in the bottoms of deep, damp ravines. Some rabbits, small rodents, snakes and lizards run, hop or slither fast enough or burrow deep enough to survive. Fish are safe . . . but perhaps not for long.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1991
It is very unfortunate that Esther Burkett, Orange County's state wildlife biologist for the California Department of Fish and Game, left her position in Orange County to accept a promotion in Sacramento ("A Rare Breed--The Outspoken Wildlife Biologist--Vanishes," March 11). Burkett's leaving will cause a temporary vacancy in the position of state wildlife biologist in Orange County. Such a vacancy will cause irreparable damage to wildlife and resources when up to 150 road and housing projects per month will be approved without much review.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2001 | KEVIN F. SHERRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Think of it as "The Crocodile Hunter"--but on a smaller scale. For the past several months, biologists from the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area have been climbing steep hills and lugging equipment through creeks to catalog the reptiles and amphibians that make their homes in the area. The National Park Service thinks about 35 species of reptiles and amphibians live in the mountains. Of those, 13 species are considered rare, threatened or endangered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1993 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Jennings, the Indiana Jones of the frog world, scaled two waterfalls to reach a remote canyon of the San Gabriel Mountains, only to find his worst nightmare confirmed. "Nice stream. No frogs," he said. A floppy felt hat shaded sunlight from his ruddy face. Big Mermaids Creek washed its cold waters around his boots. "It's not like they are hiding. They're just gone." Jennings, who works for the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1998 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rabid bat discovered in a Westside backyard triggered a flurry of concerns Tuesday among county officials over a bat census to be conducted in Topanga Canyon. Concerned that bat counters might be exposed to rabies dangers, county health officials warned the Department of Public Works and other county officials. But biologists argued that there is no danger to the public or the bat census-takers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1994 | ELAINE TASSY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Instead of enjoying cake and ice cream, Arthur Ochoa spent his 11th birthday Thursday hiking through the mountains, tracking animals and smelling sage and wildflowers. He and 59 other fifth-graders from Glenn L. Martin Elementary School in Santa Ana visited the 1,200-acre Rancho Mission Viejo Land Conservancy as part of the Junior Wildlife Biologist Program, which gives students hands-on exposure to wildlife biology. "There's a lot of interesting things that I haven't seen before," Ochoa said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2002 | From a Times Staff Writer
A third condor chick is believed to have hatched this week in Ventura County's back country, further demonstrating to biologists that their recovery efforts for the endangered birds are working. The egg had been monitored by biologists with the California Condor Recovery Plan for the last eight weeks and was hatched Tuesday near the Sespe Condor Sanctuary of the Los Padres National Forest, north of Fillmore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1992 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years after embarking on an effort to set up a spinoff colony of California sea otters on San Nicolas Island, scientists now say the project is unrealistic and will not help save the species from extinction. But U. S. Fish and Wildlife biologists have stopped short of calling the program a failure--a declaration that would require them to capture the 15 animals that live at the remote island and move them back to the Monterey area.
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