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Wildlife Management

NEWS
November 11, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials will allow a controversial gold mine to open in a sensitive area of the eastern Mojave Desert next year, but the project's operator has agreed to comply with a set of environmental conditions described as unprecedented in the booming gold mining industry. Under a plan approved by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Viceroy Gold Corp. of Las Vegas will operate a so-called "heap leach" mine in the Castle Mountains, a rugged range 100 miles east of Barstow.
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SPORTS
August 1, 1990 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Phil Pister retired from the California Department of Fish and Game this year, he almost heard a sigh of relief at headquarters in Sacramento, followed by keen apprehension. If Pister (pronounced PEE-ster) was regarded as an agitator around the DFG, at least he was their agitator. The prospect of Pister off the leash was fearsome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1999 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are your neighbors, but you rarely see them. They have lived here longer than anyone, but odds are you have never met. They are killers, but they are not after you. They exist as a baleful howl from the hills, a glint of night eyes, or a flicker of fur darting through brush. Lots of big carnivores still prowl their domain of the Santa Monica Mountains and adjoining hill country of east Ventura County, but it is a shrinking wild kingdom.
SPORTS
February 7, 1990 | RICH ROBERTS
"Hunters are being harassed in the field. "Professional wildlife management is being attacked in the courts. "Legislators are proposing piecemeal wildlife management measures. "The state agencies authorized to manage our resources and our wildlife seem unable to function in this environment. "Hear the facts . . . (and) help to devise a positive course of action to protect professional wildlife management and your right to hunt."
SPORTS
March 22, 1989 | PETE THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Wildlife officials are proud of their work at the Grizzly Island Wildlife Area. Their herd of tule elk has grown to more than 100 since seven from the Owens Valley were introduced to the area in 1977. And the herd is still prospering. River otters still swim playfully in the meandering waterways, home also to giant white sturgeon and striped bass.
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Wildlife management used to consist of little more than issuing hunting and fishing permits and keeping an eye peeled for poachers. It isn't that simple anymore. Wildlife officials these days labor amid a thicket of environmental issues, including endangered species protection, biodiversity and habitat management. Keeping up with changes in laws and regulations could be a full-time job in itself.
NEWS
March 31, 1989
An experiment to save beavers, which were deliberately introduced into many parts of the San Bernardino National Forest and elsewhere in California, appears in some ways to have been entirely too successful, and that has wildlife biologists in a quandary. At least a decade ago a golden beaver stumbled into a pleasant grove of trees at the edge of the San Gorgonio Wilderness about 25 miles south of here and found a stand of aspens--its favorite food.
NEWS
March 14, 1992 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like teen-age hoods the coyotes prowl the streets of her Solana Beach neighborhood in gangs of two or three, Jeannie Hansen says, casing back yards in broad daylight and stalking back-yard pets. She should know. The 48-year-old nursing supervisor says she has lost eight pets in the past decade to the predators that wander up to her northern San Diego County home from the coastal lagoon and wildlife preserve next door.
NEWS
April 1, 1998 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal agricultural officials are launching an investigation this week into the death of a government pilot, the fourth killed in a 17-month period while shooting coyotes from a low-flying plane as part of a little-known federal program. LaWanna Clark, 51, of Mariposa, Calif., was killed March 11 when the plane she was piloting crashed during a pursuit of coyotes on a cattle ranch near the Grapevine in Kern County. A co-pilot instructor survived with a broken leg and multiple bruises.
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