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Wildlife Refuges

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
More than 200 Ventura County and U.S. Forest Service firefighters battled a 30-acre brush fire Saturday afternoon in the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge northeast of Fillmore. Authorities expected the blaze, which began about 3:15 p.m., to be contained by about 10 p.m. No injuries were reported, and the cause is still under investigation, said Kathy Good, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Forest Service.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
The State Water Project, which helps supply a majority of Californians, will make small deliveries this year, officials said Friday as they increased the system's allocation to 5% from the historic zero announced in January. February and March storms in Northern California raised the levels of the state's two largest reservoirs enough to allow federal water managers to also significantly boost deliveries to wildlife refuges and irrigation districts with the most senior water rights in the Sacramento Valley.
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NEWS
April 5, 1997 | Associated Press
The Navy and the Fish and Wildlife Service are dedicating the island of Midway as a national wildlife refuge. Situated about 1,250 miles northwest of Honolulu, the island is best known as the site of the Battle of Midway during World War II. Now, millions of migratory birds come to the atoll to nest. Under Navy jurisdiction since 1903, the island now will be under the Fish and Wildlife Service and will be open to the public for the first time in 50 years, the Pentagon said Thursday.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON — The Obama administration Tuesday announced a nationwide plan to help wildlife adapt to threats from climate change. Developed along with state and tribal authorities, the strategy seeks to preserve species as global warming alters their historical habitats and, in many cases, forces them to migrate across state and tribal borders. Over the next five years, the plan establishes priorities for what will probably be a decades-long effort. One key proposal is to create wildlife "corridors" that would let animals and plants move to new habitats.
NATIONAL
March 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
After an absence of more than a century, wild bison were returned to Colorado's Front Range. Sixteen buffalo from the National Bison Range in northwestern Montana were released into an enclosed 1,400-acre section of a wildlife refuge that formerly was the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, where nerve gas and other chemical weapons were manufactured. The refuge, which is about 10 miles from downtown Denver, already is home to deer, bald eagles and hundreds of other species.
NEWS
May 19, 1997 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Honking contentedly, their wings beating a rhythm that signals no urgency, the Canada geese are returning as the sun casts a glow across the marsh water. After gleaning the cornfields as far as 30 miles to the east, they will roost for the night in the silence of the reeds. The habitat the flocks find here at the largest protected freshwater marsh along the Midwest's waterfowl highway is at the core of a five-year debate coming to a head in Congress: Should U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1991
A man was found dead Tuesday in a small creek in a densely wooded section of the Woodley Avenue Park Wildlife Refuge near Sepulveda Dam, Los Angeles police said. No identification was found on the body, which may have been that of a homeless man who lived in the area, police said. The man, estimated to be about 30 years old, was found face down in about 18 inches of water and may have drowned after having some type of seizure, Lt. Jim Watters said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1990
Two Redding men on a midnight duck hunt in Marina del Rey were arrested early Friday for firing at birds in a protected wildlife area. Sean Burns Jackson, 26, and Richard Theodore Arellano, 20, both of Redding, face charges of firing a gun in a negligent manner, possessing loaded firearms in a vehicle and cruelty to animals, Sheriff's Deputy Gabe Ramirez said. A resident called about 2 a.m.
NEWS
December 22, 1994 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Freeing more than 1 million acre-feet of contested water, a federal appeals court Wednesday removed a significant legal barrier to the historic accord recently reached to protect the Sacramento Delta estuary. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals vacated a lower judge's injunction that had halted release of water earmarked for the delta and for wildlife refuges in the Sacramento and San Joaquin River valleys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000 | ZANTO PEABODY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County district attorney's office has asked a judge to impose stiffer penalties on the Wildlife Waystation for violating terms of a three-year probation for polluting stream beds. The request represents the first potential criminal action against the animal sanctuary since it was closed two months ago for violating state caging and environmental laws. The refuge has been on probation since 1997 for altering the creeks that run through its 120-acre campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2011 | By Maria Hsin, Los Angeles Times
Burbank animal control officers Tuesday rescued two malnourished mountain lion cubs that were hiding under a parked car — but not before residents reportedly tried hitting them with a broomstick. The cubs weigh 5 pounds each and were taken to a refuge in Calabasas. Burbank Police Sgt. Darin Ryburn said residents called in the cubs' location in the 600 block of East Orange Grove Avenue about 10:30 a.m. The cubs were so small, they were initially reported as baby bobcats. Some residents were using brooms to try to hit the cubs or shoo them away, Ryburn said.
NATIONAL
August 19, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
The Great Dismal Swamp, befitting its name, is not the most hospitable of places. The 110,000 acres of unforgiving forested marshland in southeastern Virginia served as refuge for fleeing Native Americans in the 1600s and runaway slaves in the 1800s. The same inaccessibility that provided protection to some in the past has created difficulties for crews battling a wildfire that has charred more than 6,000 acres at the national wildlife refuge since Aug. 4. "There are vines so thick that you get tangled up if you don't have a machete," said deputy refuge manager Cindy Lane.
OPINION
November 24, 2010
Right about now in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, dozens of pregnant female polar bears are preparing to give birth in dens they dug into the snowdrifts last month, unaware that the fate of their home, and possibly their species, hinges on the price of gasoline. The Obama administration can and should change that. Big Oil and its congressional allies have been mounting attempts to open the refuge to oil and gas development since the 1970s. There is no immediate danger that they'll succeed.
TRAVEL
October 3, 2010 | By Joanna Corman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
THE BEST WAY TO SACRAMENTO From LAX, nonstop service is available on Southwest and United. Restricted round-trip fares begin at $158. WHERE TO GO At least six wildlife refuges are located within a 90-minute drive of Sacramento: Gray Lodge Wildlife Area, 3207 Rutherford Road, Gridley; (530) 846-7500, http://www.dfg.ca.gov/lands/wa/region2/graylodge/index.html . About 60 miles north of Sacramento. Admission $2.50 for ages 16 and older; kids are free.
TRAVEL
October 3, 2010 | By Joanna Corman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It was like a lottery-winning moment for birders. I looked up through the windshield, and there it was: brown and striped, gliding toward a tangle of reeds a few feet from our car — an American bittern. Bitterns are common at Gray Lodge Wildlife Area, but they're elusive and rarely seen. Even an ornithologist friend has seen only two or three. Gray Lodge is one of more than half a dozen wildlife refuges in the Sacramento Valley, a habitat-rich basin that comprises the northern end of the Central Valley from Redding south to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.
NATIONAL
July 30, 2010 | From a Times staff writer
In its most sweeping response to the gulf oil spill, the House on Friday approved legislation that would impose new environmental safeguards for offshore drilling, remove a liability cap for spill damages, and slap industry with a new tax to fund conservation projects nationwide. The Democratic-drafted legislation passed on a largely party-line 209-193 vote, but faces trouble in the deeply divided Senate. The measure would remove a $75-million liability cap on oil firms for economic damages caused by spills and hit energy producers with a new $2-per-barrel tax to fund land purchases for national parks, forests and wildlife refuges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2000 | ZANTO PEABODY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The embattled Wildlife Waystation animal refuge, accused in a state report of violating environmental and animal protection laws, got the backing of one of the nation's largest wildlife sanctuary associations Wednesday. The American Sanctuary Assn., of which the Waystation near Tujunga is the largest member, announced its support after a conference call among board members. Waystation founder Martine Colette is vice president of the board and participated in the call.
NEWS
April 25, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The House passed a measure to make fishing, hunting and other recreation primary uses of federal wildlife refuges, in direct competition with wildlife conservation. The legislation, which was blasted by conservation groups as a perversion of the purpose of refuges, passed 287 to 138. The White House Office of Management and Budget said that it would recommend that the legislation be vetoed because it would "greatly weaken the U.S.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2009 | Associated Press
A judge on Thursday blocked a federal rule allowing people to carry concealed, loaded guns in national parks and wildlife refuges. The decision by U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly halts a change in regulations issued in the waning days of the Bush administration and orders further review. She set an April 20 deadline for the Interior Department to review the rule and indicate its course of action in response to the injunction. The rule, which took effect Jan.
NATIONAL
November 19, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Madeleine Pickens, wife of oil tycoon T. Boone Pickens, said she would create a refuge for wild horses after the Bureau of Land Management said it might have to kill some to control the herds and protect the range. About 33,000 wild horses and burros roam the open range in 10 Western states, half of those in Nevada. The BLM wants the population to be about 27,000, to protect the herd, the range and other foraging animals. Horses that are too old or unadoptable are sent to long-term holding facilities.
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