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William Blake

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Long-lost etchings by writer William Blake have been discovered in a library in Manchester, England. The Romantic poet and author was also a talented artist -- one whose repertoire has just been expanded by this large etching collection. Three hundred and fifty plates were found in a two-year search by students from the University of Manchester and art historian Colin Trodd, who is a Blake expert, the Independent reports. Blake was born in 1757 in London, the son of a glove merchant, and said to have had visions from a young age. His best-known works of poetry may be the collections "Songs of Innocence" (1789)
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
William Blake's cottage in Felpham, West Sussex in England, is for sale. The poet who wrote "The Tyger" and the collections "Songs of Innocence" and "Songs of Experience" lived in the brick and stone cottage from 1800-1803. The house has been modernized since he moved. Its features include a blue plaque commemorating the famous poet's time there, two floors, four bedrooms, exposed beams and brick, a glass-walled garden room, a home office, a garage, an enclosed garden and an outbuilding used as a summer house.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
William Blake's cottage in Felpham, West Sussex in England, is for sale. The poet who wrote "The Tyger" and the collections "Songs of Innocence" and "Songs of Experience" lived in the brick and stone cottage from 1800-1803. The house has been modernized since he moved. Its features include a blue plaque commemorating the famous poet's time there, two floors, four bedrooms, exposed beams and brick, a glass-walled garden room, a home office, a garage, an enclosed garden and an outbuilding used as a summer house.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Long-lost etchings by writer William Blake have been discovered in a library in Manchester, England. The Romantic poet and author was also a talented artist -- one whose repertoire has just been expanded by this large etching collection. Three hundred and fifty plates were found in a two-year search by students from the University of Manchester and art historian Colin Trodd, who is a Blake expert, the Independent reports. Blake was born in 1757 in London, the son of a glove merchant, and said to have had visions from a young age. His best-known works of poetry may be the collections "Songs of Innocence" (1789)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1994
In an otherwise fine review of the Huntington Library and Art Gallery's current William Blake exhibition, Times art critic William Wilson resurrects the terrible groaner of pegging the man as a "mystic" and a "metaphysical seer" ("William Blake's Vision Shines in His Prints at Huntington," Oct. 4). Led by Northrop Frye, Blake scholars have spent the better part of 40 years patiently pleading with various Victorian graveyard poets, alchemists, Druids, beats, hippies and New Agers to stop reading Blake as a mystic.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1994 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
The Southwest Chamber Music Society opened its eighth season Monday night with what, for this organization, has become a characteristic event: an intelligently chosen, exploratory program, solidly performed. The other good news was the venue itself. The Huntington Library in San Marino, which hasn't served, at least in recent memory, as a major concert site, proved again an exceptional location for chamber music.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1988 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
English artist, philosopher and poet William Blake (1757-1827) never allowed physical appearances to get in his way. Possessed of a visionary imagination, he portrayed a spiritual reality concealed by the visible world. But unlike romanticists who deal with muzzy ideas by smudging edges or veiling their imagery, Blake delineated his visions precisely. As we see in "William Blake and His Contemporaries and Followers: Selected Works From the Collection of Robert N.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The British Library has put on display the notebook in which William Blake wrote one of his most famous poems, "The Tyger," to mark the 250th anniversary year of the English poet and artist's birth. The British Library also has posted online a digital version of Blake's manuscript notebook, in which he made sketches and drafted his poems for more than 30 years.
BOOKS
December 1, 1991 | Lewis Segal
Most readers know William Blake only as a mystical English poet of the late 18th/early 19th Century. However, writing a poem such as "Tyger Tyger, burning bright" was merely the beginning of Blake's creative process. After illustrating and hand-engraving a text, Blake would print it, then richly color the pages for each individual buyer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2003 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
William Blake was an English tradesman -- and a mystic, a visionary, an artist with the prophetic burden of being dismissed in his own day. Not just ignored, but disparaged as eccentric and deranged. Blake's sanity is still a contentious subject nearly 200 years after his death, but the significance of his work as poet, painter and printmaker has long been beyond question. His persona, too, has become magnified over time.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's often said that the journey is the oldest of narrative forms, and much of Jim Jarmusch's career has been devoted to finding new variations on this ancient theme. His filmography abounds with road trips and wanderlust-stricken heroes, from the hepcat drifter in his no-budget debut, "Permanent Vacation," to the enigmatic hit man on a mission through Spain in his latest, "The Limits of Control. " But no Jarmusch journey has been as cosmic — as much of a trip, in every sense of the word — as his hallucinatory frontier odyssey "Dead Man. " The film earned mixed reviews when it opened in 1996, nearly a year after its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival and after a reported wrangle over the final edit between Jarmusch and the distributor, Miramax.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The British Library has put on display the notebook in which William Blake wrote one of his most famous poems, "The Tyger," to mark the 250th anniversary year of the English poet and artist's birth. The British Library also has posted online a digital version of Blake's manuscript notebook, in which he made sketches and drafted his poems for more than 30 years.
OPINION
December 24, 2006 | Philip Pullman, PHILIP PULLMAN is the author of many books, including "The Golden Compass," "The Subtle Knife" and "The Amber Spyglass," which together make up the "His Dark Materials" trilogy.
IN 1962 OR thereabouts, when I was a young boy intoxicated by the sounds that poetry makes, I came across Allen Ginsberg's "Howl." I read it with astonishment and with an almost sensual delight.
NEWS
March 31, 2005 | From Associated Press
The British government on Wednesday temporarily blocked the export of 19 watercolors by visionary artist William Blake. The paintings, "Designs for Blair's 'Grave,' " were last seen in public in the 1830s, and seven of them had been unknown to modern scholars, the department for culture, media and sport said. The government's action gives any potential British buyer until May 30 to raise the purchase price of $16.5 million to keep the watercolors in Britain. Commissioned in 1805 by publisher R.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2004 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
WILLIAM BLAKE, the English religious poet, engraver and painter of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, was an eccentric visionary. His works -- including his most famous collections of poems, "Songs of Innocence" and "Songs of Experience" (containing the celebrated "Tyger Tyger, burning bright ...") -- were illustrated, printed and distributed by Blake, with the help of his able wife, Catherine Boucher.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2003 | Jeremy Eichler, Special to The Times
When the eminent American composer William Bolcom appears this afternoon in Founders Hall at the Orange County Performing Arts Center, you might expect him to be doing something composer-like, such as studying a score or conducting his work or lecturing professorially on his music.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2004 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
WILLIAM BLAKE, the English religious poet, engraver and painter of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, was an eccentric visionary. His works -- including his most famous collections of poems, "Songs of Innocence" and "Songs of Experience" (containing the celebrated "Tyger Tyger, burning bright ...") -- were illustrated, printed and distributed by Blake, with the help of his able wife, Catherine Boucher.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A sketchbook belonging to the British poet and artist William Blake that sold 125 years ago for the equivalent of $30 is expected to fetch about $875,000 when it comes up for auction next month at Christie's in London. "The works of William Blake have been in such demand for so long that it is rare for anything by him to come to market now," said the head of English watercolors and drawings at Christie's.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2003 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
William Blake was an English tradesman -- and a mystic, a visionary, an artist with the prophetic burden of being dismissed in his own day. Not just ignored, but disparaged as eccentric and deranged. Blake's sanity is still a contentious subject nearly 200 years after his death, but the significance of his work as poet, painter and printmaker has long been beyond question. His persona, too, has become magnified over time.
SPORTS
November 26, 2000 | BOB OATES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the season's surprise success-story teams, the New Orleans Saints, will line up in St. Louis today without the two players who did the most to turn things around this fall in the Superdome. They are Jeff Blake, the quarterback who broke a foot in the first quarter of the Oakland game last week as New Orleans' winning streak ended at six, 31- 22, and Ricky Williams, the running back who broke an ankle seven days earlier.
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