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William Buckley

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NEWS
October 13, 1985
Islamic Jihad terrorists in Lebanon released a blurred photograph of the body of a man they alleged was executed American hostage William Buckley and offered to exchange his body for 100 Palestinians jailed in Israel. In Washington, a State Department spokesman said, "We do not regard the alleged photograph as convincing evidence that Mr. Buckley is no longer alive." The 57-year-old U.S.
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OPINION
December 2, 2011
Bush's tax cuts Re "Bush-era tax cuts still loom large," Nov. 28 To Republicans who continue to protest the expiration of the Bush-era tax cuts for the most affluent Americans, based on the theory that tax cuts for wealthy business owners stimulate job growth: The theory isn't working. The cuts have been in place for a decade, yet unemployment has increased since 2007, and forecasts indicate it will remain at the present 9% rate until next year, if not longer.
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NEWS
December 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The remains of the last American held hostage in Lebanon were returned to U.S. soil. The skeletal remains of William Buckley, who was the CIA station chief in Beirut, arrived aboard an Air Force jet at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. He will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery. Buckley was abducted in March, 1984, and slain by his captors the following year. His body was found Friday by Lebanese police acting on a tip.
OPINION
November 27, 2011 | By Carl T. Bogus
The modern conservative movement began 60 years ago with the publication of a book by a 26-year-old first-time author. Reflecting on that work teaches us something important about the nature and trajectory of modern conservatism, about the energy that propelled the movement and about serious problems with the movement today. The book was "God and Man at Yale. " The author was William F. Buckley Jr. GAMAY (as conservatives often call this iconic work) was an attack on the young author's alma mater.
NEWS
December 28, 1991 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even as hopes dimmed for the 1991 release of two Germans, the last two Westerners known to be held hostage here, Lebanese authorities on Friday positively identified remains dumped hours earlier near a Beirut airport road as those of slain U.S. hostage William Buckley. After a two-hour autopsy at the American University of Beirut Hospital, Dr.
NEWS
January 21, 1987 | United Press International
Vice President George Bush said Tuesday night that President Reagan "is certain to this very day" that the sale of weapons to Iran was not an arms-for-hostages swap. Bush told a conference on terrorism that the Administration, wounded by the Iran arms affair, now has "the opportunity to restore the credibility of our policy." "We have to stand up to terrorism and we have to keep standing up until we stop it," he said.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | Associated Press
U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar said Friday that he expects the body of one of two Americans who died in captivity in Lebanon to be released soon. "We were expecting the return of a body any time; I wouldn't be surprised if they are going to get it to us today or tomorrow," said Perez de Cuellar. The two missing men are William R. Higgins, a U.S. Marine lieutenant colonel, and William Buckley, an embassy political officer and the former CIA station chief in Beirut.
NEWS
May 14, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
Three years after he was tortured and slain by terrorists in Lebanon, William Buckley, chief of the CIA's Beirut station, was honored Friday by friends and colleagues at a memorial service as a top-notch intelligence officer who did not back away from risks. The ceremony was the first public tribute for Buckley, whose sensitive position with the agency was cloaked in official secrecy for long after his abduction.
NEWS
November 22, 1987 | Associated Press
Childhood friends, high school classmates and relatives gathered at a memorial service Saturday for Lebanon hostage William Buckley at the church where he was once an altar boy. "I could tell you stories about when Bill was an altar boy," Father Mark Hannon said during the Mass at St. Patrick's Parish in Stoneham, a small town just north of Boston. "He used to stop and buy a couple of doughnuts to eat on the way to Mass."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1986 | Associated Press
Former hostage David Jacobsen says he thinks that hostage William Buckley died on June 3, 1985, five months before his Muslim captors said he had been killed. "He was delirious. He was regurgitating. He obviously was running a very high fever," Jacobsen said of Buckley in an interview on NBC-TV's "1986," aired Tuesday night. "The guards came to me because I was a hospital director and said, 'What can we do?' And I said you better take him to see, get a doctor to him.
OPINION
February 28, 2008 | Jacob Heilbrunn, Jacob Heilbrunn is a senior editor at the National Interest and the author of "They Knew They Were Right: the Rise of the Neocons."
By common consent, William F. Buckley Jr., who died Wednesday, was the father of modern conservatism. But he also ended up as one of the Bush administration's most trenchant critics. His death not only represents the loss of one of America's leading intellectual figures but also underscores the extent of the collapse of the conservative movement that has so decisively shaped politics for decades.
OPINION
February 28, 2008
William F. Buckley Jr., as anybody who has seen the great Buckley impressions by Joe Flaherty or Robin Williams can attest, was hardly inimitable. But the contributions of the National Review founder and long-serving icon of conservatism extended far beyond his personal style and charisma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Pat Buckley, the fundraiser, New York socialite and wife of conservative writer William F. Buckley Jr., died Sunday in Stamford, Conn. She was 80. She died of septic poisoning after a vascular operation on her left leg, according to the National Review, the magazine founded by her husband in 1955. Pat Buckley was a fixture in New York's social circles for four decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2004 | Hillel Italie, Associated Press
For decades, the lips of William F. Buckley, the maestro of "Firing Line" and other conservative affairs, would famously curl as he regarded the perceived follies of his liberal opponents. But on a recent afternoon, the smile is only sweet as he considers any follies of his own, the bumps sustained on what Buckley, a confirmed man of the sea, might call the long voyage of life. Personal letdowns? No.
NEWS
June 17, 2002 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Crimes Against Humanity; such as murder, extermination, enslavement, deportation, and other inhumane acts against civilian populations." This, along with criminal mistreatment of POWs, conspiracy to wage aggressive war and waging aggressive war, was the charge leveled at such key members of the Third Reich as Hermann Goering, Albert Speer, Julius Streicher and Joachim von Ribbentrop at the Nuremberg Trials in 1945.
BOOKS
July 22, 2001 | JEFF TURRENTINE, Jeff Turrentine is an essayist and critic whose articles have appeared in the Los Angeles Times Book Review, The New York Times Magazine, Slate.com and other publications
"I'm going off now to see the director of the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs," Elvis said. "Senator Murphy said he'd call him and tell him I wanted to see him. His name--" Elvis removed a memo pad from his pocket. "His name is John Ingersoll." It takes a rare kind of self-confidence to pen a paragraph that has the king of rock 'n' roll running high-level errands through Washington D.C.'s corridors of power. But certainly no one has ever accused William F. Buckley Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1987
I was appalled by David P. Jacobsen's foolish, even dangerous, proposals to secure the release of the American hostages in Lebanon ("Start Talking and Save the Hostages," Op-Ed Page, Aug. 28). Jacobsen begins by attacking the State Department, unfairly blaming them for the deaths of William Buckley and Peter Kilburn. He goes on to imply, again unfairly, that timid, overly cautious State Department officials, including Secretary George Shultz, failed to take decisive action in order to save these two men. First, once the terrorists identified Buckley as the CIA station head in Beirut it is unlikely that anyone or anything could have prevented his murder.
NEWS
December 28, 1986
After six years of magic, President Reagan broke the spell. By deceiving the nation, he and those around him badly damaged his presidency. This traumatic tale is still unfolding, with no end in sight. This is how it developed. 'We did not--repeat did not--trade weapons or anything else for hostages, nor will we.' Nov. 13 television address. 'I was not fully informed on the nature of one of the activities undertaken in connection with this initiative.' Nov.
BOOKS
August 20, 2000 | EUGEN WEBER, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review and the author, most recently, of "Apocalypses."
It would be nice if members of the criminous classes limited their attentions to one another; if gang bangs and drive-by shootings affected no innocent bystanders and lawbreakers exterminated one another under some rule of mutually assured destruction. It doesn't work that way, worse luck.
BOOKS
November 21, 1999 | DOUGLAS BRINKLEY, Douglas Brinkley is the author of "Dean Acheson: The Cold War Years" and "Driven Patriot: The Life and Times of James Forrestal." He is director of the Eisenhower Center and professor of history at the University of New Orleans
On the night of Feb. 9, 1950, a GOP women's group in Wheeling, W. Va., heard one of the most deplorable speeches in the annals of American politics when a reckless and bombastic freshman Republican senator from Wisconsin charged that the Truman administration was teeming with communists. Waving a sheet of paper like a battle flag, Joseph McCarthy claimed he had a list of some 205 Red traitors in his hand--a dishonor roll of U.S.
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