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William C W Mow

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BUSINESS
August 8, 1989 | BARRY STAVRO, Times Staff Writer
William C. W. Mow sat in his Chatsworth office smoking cigarettes and trying to explain the strange detours in his life. At 53, he's attained a success that few will enjoy. As founder and chairman of Bugle Boy Industries, he runs one of the hottest clothing companies in America. Last year's sales of $267 million should climb to $500 million this year, he predicts.
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BUSINESS
September 28, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Mow knows it could be years before China's farmers, shop owners and bureaucrats can afford to fill their closets with Bugle Boy's denim jackets, knit shirts and jeans. But last year, Mow, Bugle Boy's founder and chief executive, took a bold step in that direction. He shifted his Asia headquarters across the border from Hong Kong into this special economic zone, one of Communist China's most successful capitalist experiments.
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BUSINESS
September 28, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Mow knows it could be years before China's farmers, shop owners and bureaucrats can afford to fill their closets with Bugle Boy's denim jackets, knit shirts and jeans. But last year, Mow, Bugle Boy's founder and chief executive, took a bold step in that direction. He shifted his Asia headquarters across the border from Hong Kong into this special economic zone, one of Communist China's most successful capitalist experiments.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1989 | BARRY STAVRO, Times Staff Writer
William C. W. Mow sat in his Chatsworth office smoking cigarettes and trying to explain the strange detours in his life. At 53, he's attained a success that few will enjoy. As founder and chairman of Bugle Boy Industries, he runs one of the hottest clothing companies in America. Last year's sales of $267 million should climb to $500 million this year, he predicts.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1989 | JANE APPLEGATE
Ten Los Angeles area small businesses and their owners were honored Thursday as part of the "Entrepreneur of the Year" program sponsored by the accounting firm of Arthur Young and Inc. magazine. The winners, announced shortly after Mayor Tom Bradley declared June 15 "Entrepreneur's Day" in Los Angeles, will compete in a national competition for entrepreneur of the year. EPI Products, the Culver City maker of Epilady personal care products, won the competition among companies less than 5 years old. Arlene Krok is president.
NEWS
December 7, 1994 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing restraints on its investigative capability, the Federal Election Commission has dismissed complaints against 36 wealthy Americans who exceeded the $25,000 annual limit on federal campaign contributions. The FEC action, taken Nov. 14 in a closed-door meeting, was disclosed Tuesday by the Center for Responsive Politics, a nonpartisan watchdog group that filed papers in January accusing 64 individuals of violating campaign reform laws.
REAL ESTATE
August 20, 2000 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Dwight Yoakam, one of country music's biggest stars, has sold his Malibu getaway, with a panoramic ocean view, for close to its $825,000 asking price. Yoakam, who appeared Thursday at the Universal Amphitheatre, released his "dwightyoakamacoustic.net" album in June and has been working on the new studio album "Tomorrow's Sounds Today," due out in the fall.
NEWS
November 15, 1993 | GLENN F. BUNTING and DWIGHT MORRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
William C. W. Mow, chairman of Bugle Boy Jeans in Los Angeles, says he had no clue he was doing anything illegal. By contrast, Ft. Lauderdale investment executive Thomas Hansberger concedes up front that he is "guilty as charged." Some wealthy Americans blame their spouses. Many are angry that federal authorities failed to notify them about their offenses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1992 | MAIA DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A major clothing manufacturer has proposed building a distribution center and factory outlet mall in Moorpark that could employ up to 700 people and bring the city about $150,000 a year in sales tax revenue. Bugle Boy Industries Inc.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1999 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The private jet is no longer the exclusive status symbol of the most privileged class. Just ask Jere Hess, director of public relations for Peavey Electronics in Meridian, Miss. The company's 14-passenger jet whisks employee teams weekly to conventions and joint venture projects across the nation and the world. "We couldn't do business without it," Hess said. "It's as simple as that."
OPINION
February 9, 1992 | Responses compiled by Jeff Levin, who has worked in state and local government
The current recession, and associated job losses, in California is one of the severest in recent memory. How to reverse the state's economic slide is a question on everyone's mind. The Times asked a variety of people what they would do to restore economic health. WOLFGANG PUCK, Chef, restaurant owner More aggressive promotion of tourism in California, not just for Disneyland and Universal Studios.
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