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William Claxton

ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
When a respected group of dissident trustees complained in a recent letter to The Times about the new direction being taken by the Museum of Contemporary Art, at the top of its list of concerns was "the caliber of its exhibitions. " MOCA Director Jeffrey Deitch vigorously disagreed in a subsequent interview , but the group's vexation is understandable. A certain homogenized sameness pervades the new program, which is about as boring as having the same Campbell's soup every day for lunch.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2006 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
William P. Gottlieb, a jazz journalist whose photographic images became nothing less than an archive of a golden era of music and musicians, has died. He was 89. Gottlieb died Sunday at his home in Great Neck, N.Y., of complications from a stroke he suffered late last week, according to his son, Ed. From 1938 to 1948, Gottlieb created a remarkable body of photographs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW
FACES "I work in all different materials, but I think each means something and has its own specific codes," says sculptor Rita McBride, who has three large pieces made of her latest material, rattan, on view at Margo Leavin Gallery on North Hilldale Avenue, through Dec. 22. "In some ways, rattan is very cheap and inelegant. It has kind of a trendy, '60s connotation--everybody has it in their home," says the spunky McBride, 30.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2002 | STEVE HOCHMAN
A lot of people will hear Tom Petty's upcoming album, "The Last DJ," as an indictment of the music business. The title song, for example, decries the centralization and depersonalization of radio programming. "Money Becomes King" is the narrative of a disheartened fan who watches a rock hero's values and art get lost in a sea of commercialism, to a point where the fan feels that "all the music gave me was a craving for lite beer." Petty, however, advises fans not to take things too literally.
MAGAZINE
February 28, 1999 | MARY MCNAMARA, Mary McNamara is a Times staff writer. Her last feature for the magazine was on interior designer Kevin Haley
It is possibly the reddest article of clothing on the planet. Peggy Moffitt's vinyl raincoat, ankle length, lined in brown sheared mink, moving along the bright white way of Sunset Plaza like a maraschino cherry bobbing in a flute of champagne. She's in it, of course, holding a matching purse and discussing the coat's various merits, only one of which is protection from a still chill, though no longer rainy, morning. "It really is just the thing when I'm traveling," she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Jazz has been through some apocalyptic developments during the past two decades. It has found new courses to chart, given rise to new related idioms such as fusion and New Age and grown immensely in the number of men and women studying it at colleges and performing it at concert halls and festivals worldwide. A glance at the first "Golden Feather Awards" column, which appeared in these pages Jan. 2, 1966, points up some of these changes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's time for our semiannual look at jazz on the Web. And with the proliferation of sites taking place, twice a year is barely often enough to cover some of the more interesting destinations. Record Companies. The news here, unfortunately, is not exactly encouraging, which is surprising, given that the Web has become such a powerful source of information for consumers. But Blue Note's Web site (http://www.bluenote.com) is cumbersome, generally out of date and often lacking in pertinent detail.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
The extent to which a musician's life can mirror the evolution of society in 20th-Century America has never been more graphically illustrated than in "Bass Lines: The Stories and Photographs of Milt Hinton" (Temple University Press: $39.95, 328 pages). His family links go back to antebellum days (his mother's mother was a slave on a Vicksburg plantation) and to Africa (his father came here with a missionary group from Monrovia).
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