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William Davis

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NEWS
August 23, 1995
William Strethen (Wild Bill) Davis, 77, jazz organist, pianist and arranger for such performers as Duke Ellington, Count Basie and Earl (Fatha) Hines. Davis was perhaps best known as an arranger for Hines, bandleader Louis Jordan and Basie's orchestra. But he also did much to popularize the Hammond organ as a jazz instrument, playing it in full orchestral style in solo performances throughout the United States and Europe.
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OPINION
March 26, 2005
Re "Big Labor's Speaker" (editorial, March 23): So, state Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez (D-Los Angeles) is getting $35,000 as an annual "consulting fee" from an arm of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, headed by labor power broker Miguel Contreras. When did the PRI (Mexico's former ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party) and its practices supplant the Democratic Party? William Davis Yorba Linda
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BUSINESS
April 9, 1992
William Grenville Davis has been appointed a director of First American Financial Corp. in Santa Ana. He will also be a director of the company's principal subsidiary, First American Title Insurance Co. Davis, the former premier of Ontario, Canada, is now a law firm's counsel.
OPINION
January 26, 2005
Re "Why I'm Willing to Defend Hussein," Commentary, Jan. 24: Ramsey Clark has injected himself into the defense of Saddam Hussein. I wonder if Hussein has been nuts enough to accept this offer of assistance. Clark's article reveals the same tired and virulent anti-Americanism he has harbored for decades. He is the Ezra Pound of the left. William Davis Yorba Linda In explaining his reasons for wanting to defend Hussein, Clark states, "That Hussein and other former Iraqi officials must have lawyers of their choice to assist them in defending against the criminal charges brought against them ought to be self-evident among a people committed to truth, justice and the rule of law," and that "No power, or person, can be above the law."
BUSINESS
March 27, 1985
William Davis, the former premier of Ontario, Canada, whose administration abolished "happy hours" at province bars last year and who fought the sale of beer at Toronto's Exhibition Stadium, has been elected a director of Seagram Co., the giant Montreal-based wine and liquor producer.
BOOKS
June 8, 1986
I was very much taken by Holly Prado's review of Toby Olson's "The Woman Who Escaped From Shame" in the May 18 Book Review. I found the review highly readable, concise, intelligent and good-hearted. WILLIAM DAVIS South Pasadena
OPINION
March 26, 2005
Re "Big Labor's Speaker" (editorial, March 23): So, state Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez (D-Los Angeles) is getting $35,000 as an annual "consulting fee" from an arm of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, headed by labor power broker Miguel Contreras. When did the PRI (Mexico's former ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party) and its practices supplant the Democratic Party? William Davis Yorba Linda
NEWS
May 9, 1985
A judge ordered a new trial in Pittsburgh for a man who has served almost three years in prison for statutory rape because the alleged victim now says she lied about the incident. Judge Thomas Gladden ordered the new trial, saying the woman's new testimony indicated she had not been pressured to change her story. William Davis, 39, of Fallowfield, has served 33 months of a 3 1/2-to-10-year sentence.
OPINION
August 7, 2004
Re "The Road They All Dread," Aug. 4: In reading the article, I remembered the three people who I personally knew who had been killed there. I remember Caltrans tearing down the makeshift memorials and its fight to remove road signs warning drivers they were entering one of the most dangerous highways ever ignored by the state of California. I noted that this wasn't mentioned in the article. I was surprised that the reporter mentioned, briefly, that it would take years for impact studies for road improvements to be completed.
OPINION
August 7, 2004
Re "The Road They All Dread," Aug. 4: In reading the article, I remembered the three people who I personally knew who had been killed there. I remember Caltrans tearing down the makeshift memorials and its fight to remove road signs warning drivers they were entering one of the most dangerous highways ever ignored by the state of California. I noted that this wasn't mentioned in the article. I was surprised that the reporter mentioned, briefly, that it would take years for impact studies for road improvements to be completed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2002
William Davis Taylor, the third generation of his family to serve as publisher of the Boston Globe, died Tuesday of heart failure at his home in Brookline, Mass. He was 93. Taylor was publisher for 22 years, beginning in 1955. During his tenure, the newspaper won 11 Pulitzer Prizes and became the first major paper to call for the resignation of Richard M. Nixon during the Watergate controversy. In the Globe's obituary, he was praised for fostering editorial independence.
NEWS
August 23, 1995
William Strethen (Wild Bill) Davis, 77, jazz organist, pianist and arranger for such performers as Duke Ellington, Count Basie and Earl (Fatha) Hines. Davis was perhaps best known as an arranger for Hines, bandleader Louis Jordan and Basie's orchestra. But he also did much to popularize the Hammond organ as a jazz instrument, playing it in full orchestral style in solo performances throughout the United States and Europe.
NEWS
March 15, 1995 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Natchez Trace is a path through the primeval woodlands of the South that played a crucial but mostly unsung role in the settlement of the American frontier and "the most dramatic exodus in history to date," as William C. Davis puts it in "A Way Through the Wilderness." "Instinct and logic of both animals and men had located it where it best served the interest of travel in the rough wilderness," Davis writes. "By this trail virtually everything came originally to the Old Southwest."
SPORTS
January 6, 1995 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
Heavyweight Jeremy Williams (19-1, 16 knockouts), on the comeback trail after a loss to Larry Donald, seeks his fifth consecutive victory tonight when he fights Everton Davis (9-4, 7 KOs) in a 12-round bout at the Grand Olympic Auditorium. The five-fight card will begin at 7. Williams, of Long Beach, appears to have shaken the affects of his loss to Donald in his 16th fight. He has since changed management teams and has knocked out Andrew Stokes, Bert Cooper, Mark Wills and Levi Billups.
OPINION
January 26, 2005
Re "Why I'm Willing to Defend Hussein," Commentary, Jan. 24: Ramsey Clark has injected himself into the defense of Saddam Hussein. I wonder if Hussein has been nuts enough to accept this offer of assistance. Clark's article reveals the same tired and virulent anti-Americanism he has harbored for decades. He is the Ezra Pound of the left. William Davis Yorba Linda In explaining his reasons for wanting to defend Hussein, Clark states, "That Hussein and other former Iraqi officials must have lawyers of their choice to assist them in defending against the criminal charges brought against them ought to be self-evident among a people committed to truth, justice and the rule of law," and that "No power, or person, can be above the law."
NEWS
January 18, 1987 | RAY PEREZ, Times Staff Writer
The owner of an insolvent Santa Ana savings and loan association would not have deliberately crashed his car to kill himself hours before state regulators seized the lending institution, its president said Saturday. Brooks A. Miller, president of North America Savings & Loan Assn., said Duayne D. Christensen, a dentist and owner of the failing savings and loan, had no reason to take his own life early Friday morning. "He had been working very feverishly to try and save the business.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1992
William Grenville Davis has been appointed a director of First American Financial Corp. in Santa Ana. He will also be a director of the company's principal subsidiary, First American Title Insurance Co. Davis, the former premier of Ontario, Canada, is now a law firm's counsel.
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