Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWilliam F Baker
IN THE NEWS

William F Baker

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1987 | CLARKE TAYLOR
The committee looking for a new president for public-television's flagship station here has decided to nominate a commercial broadcaster--William F. Baker, president of Westinghouse Broadcasting's TV group, officials at WNET-TV said Friday. The selection must be approved by WNET's 34-member board of trustees. A meeting date has not been set but one is expected to be held soon, according to the station officials, who asked that their names not be used.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1988 | CLARKE TAYLOR
When William F. Baker left the world of commercial broadcasting last spring to become president of the country's largest public television station, he promptly called upon his old friends at the commercial stations here and asked them to provide free, on-air promotion for WNET. His requests, he says, were flatly denied.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1988 | CLARKE TAYLOR
When William F. Baker left the world of commercial broadcasting last spring to become president of the country's largest public television station, he promptly called upon his old friends at the commercial stations here and asked them to provide free, on-air promotion for WNET. His requests, he says, were flatly denied.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1987 | CLARKE TAYLOR
The committee looking for a new president for public-television's flagship station here has decided to nominate a commercial broadcaster--William F. Baker, president of Westinghouse Broadcasting's TV group, officials at WNET-TV said Friday. The selection must be approved by WNET's 34-member board of trustees. A meeting date has not been set but one is expected to be held soon, according to the station officials, who asked that their names not be used.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1987 | CLARKE TAYLOR
In an attempt to increase its local audience and its subscriber base, public-TV station WNET has decided to expand to a 24-hour daily broadcast schedule. "I believe there's a whole new constituency out there," WNET president William F. Baker said in a telephone interview. "It remains to be seen whether or not there is such an audience, and whether they'll show the (financial) support we'll need to sustain the schedule."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1991 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its first distribution deal with a cable network, WNET-TV, the PBS station here, said Tuesday that its nightly talk show with interviewer Charlie Rose will also be carried on the Learning Channel. Beginning Jan. 6, the Learning Channel will air "Charlie Rose," hosted by the former anchor of CBS' "Nightwatch," at 10 p.m. (EST) Monday through Friday, a day after the original broadcast on WNET. Rose's talk show, which premiered in September, is carried live on WNET weeknights at 11 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
WNET-TV, the public television station here, has received a $5-million grant to produce a weekly news program for PBS about religion and ethics. "Religion is all around us, yet it's not really being covered by public TV or the commercial networks," said Tamara Robinson, vice president of national programming for WNET. "This series will focus on a wide range of topics, from Islamic fundamentalism to the religious perspective on issues such as welfare reform."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1987 | CLARKE TAYLOR
WNET, nearly crippled by economic woes three years ago, now is producing programs for public television worth more than $30 million--"a dramatic increase in original programming," according to station officials. "We have turned around," said Hugh Price, WNET's senior vice president in charge of production, noting that the station entered the new fiscal year this week with "an unprecedented" amount of original programming in production, both on its own and in partnership with other U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1994 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert MacNeil confirmed Monday that he will retire as co-anchor of PBS' "MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour" next year and said his decision was influenced by funding difficulties in public television. MacNeil, 63, told "NewsHour" staffers that he intends to leave in October, 1995, the newscast's 20th anniversary. Jim Lehrer, 60, who co-anchors the hourlong weekday broadcasts from Washington, will then become solo anchor, with all operations being consolidated in the nation's capital.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1992 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Texaco has decided to discontinue its underwriting of the PBS series "Great Performances" at the end of this season. The company, which had been helping to support "Great Performances" for the past two seasons, said that it was withdrawing because the series had moved away from the kinds of traditional arts programming that Texaco wants to sponsor.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | JENNIFER TOTH and KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The FBI rejected requests to stop interviewing Arab-American leaders about potential terrorist plans but has agreed to discontinue certain political questions, leaders of the Arab-American Anti-Discrimination Committee reported Monday. Albert Mokhiber, the committee chairman, said he was assured after meetings in Washington with FBI Director William S. Sessions and Assistant Director William F.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1992 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Public-TV station WNET said Tuesday that it will produce a 10-part series to teach children about the creative process behind the visual and performing arts. "Behind the Scenes," which is aimed at the 8- to 12-year-old audience, will premiere in September on PBS. It will be hosted by the comedy/magician team of Penn & Teller and will feature such artists as painter David Hockney, cartoonist Matt Groening, sculptor Nancy Graves and painter Robert Gil de Montes.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|