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William F Buckley

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OPINION
November 27, 2011 | By Carl T. Bogus
The modern conservative movement began 60 years ago with the publication of a book by a 26-year-old first-time author. Reflecting on that work teaches us something important about the nature and trajectory of modern conservatism, about the energy that propelled the movement and about serious problems with the movement today. The book was "God and Man at Yale. " The author was William F. Buckley Jr. GAMAY (as conservatives often call this iconic work) was an attack on the young author's alma mater.
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OPINION
January 15, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
It's hard for a lot of people, particularly on the right, to recognize that the conservative movement's problems are mostly problems of success. The Republican Party's problems are much more recognizable as the problems of failure, including the failure to recognize the limits of that movement's success. American conservatism began as a kind of intellectual hobbyist's group with little hope of changing the broader society. Albert Jay Nock, the cape-wearing libertarian intellectual - he called himself a "philosophical anarchist" - who inspired a very young William F. Buckley Jr., argued that political change was impossible because the masses were rubes, goons, fools or sheep, victims of the eternal tendency of the powerful to exploit the powerless.
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OPINION
December 2, 2011
Bush's tax cuts Re "Bush-era tax cuts still loom large," Nov. 28 To Republicans who continue to protest the expiration of the Bush-era tax cuts for the most affluent Americans, based on the theory that tax cuts for wealthy business owners stimulate job growth: The theory isn't working. The cuts have been in place for a decade, yet unemployment has increased since 2007, and forecasts indicate it will remain at the present 9% rate until next year, if not longer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2012 | Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
I arrived at the Gore Vidal tribute at Musso & Frank and was directed to Alan Selka, a Brit resplendent in paisley print dinner jacket, tie and waistcoat - yes, a waistcoat. "Sort of," said Selka, when I asked if he had come to the Hollywood landmark to celebrate the American novelist, playwright, political essayist and screenwriter, who died July 31 at his Hollywood Hills home at age 86. Selka, longtime butler to a Hollywood executive whom I agreed not to name, explained that he'd been introduced to Vidal by Ali MacGraw in the back of a limousine.
BOOKS
October 28, 1990 | ALEX RAKSIN
Young adults tend not to watch national news, much less read about it; middle-aged adults seem unable to shake the political skepticism they picked up in the '60s and '70s; teens are happy to hole up in the fantasy land of MTV: It sometimes appears that no medicine can revive our indifferent body politic. In "Gratitude," however, William F.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, it's been an American culinary rite. William F. Buckley Jr. flicks the air with his reptilian tongue and spears a Kneejerk Liberal or two. As television cameras record the kill, he chews thoughtfully, elegantly, and then swallows his victims whole. But times change and so do appetites. These days, the nation's best known conservative pundit is on the prowl for more exotic game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1989
I was surprised to read ("Admitted Killer's Possible Parole Prompts Protests," Part I, July 5)) that William F. Buckley was instrumental in getting convicted murderer Edgar Smith released from prison, only to have Smith abduct and attempt to kill a woman sometime later. I thought only bleeding-heart liberals let criminals free to strike again. ERIK VAUGHN Huntington Park
NEWS
July 5, 1989 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
The battered body of a 15-year-old girl was found along the bank of a sand pit in a small New Jersey town. Her skull had been crushed with a 44-pound boulder and her body beaten with a baseball bat. Edgar Smith, a 23-year-old acquaintance of the girl, was convicted of the murder and sentenced to die in the electric chair. While on Death Row in a New Jersey prison, he began corresponding with conservative columnist William F. Buckley, who eventually became convinced of Smith's innocence.
OPINION
March 31, 1991
I think William F. Buckley (Commentary, March 25) is wrong in saying the behavior of the police in the King beating is inexplicable. Bigotry is at least part of the explanation. What it is is inexcusable. WALTER D. DOUGLAS, Colton
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1996
Re "CEO Salaries, Like Sausages, Aren't Pretty," Column Right, April 11: So, William F. Buckley says AT&T eliminating 40,000 highly paid, highly skilled workers will save me $11 on my phone bill next year. That is almost exactly what lunch cost me yesterday. Hey, AT&T, keep my $11 and hire those people back. JAMES S. HUDSON Mission Viejo
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Gore Vidal, who died on Tuesday at age 86, was known primarily as a man of letters, writing numerous novels, essays, plays and screenplays throughout his long career. But his way with words extended beyond the page and into the realm of TV talk, where he made several notable appearances in his younger years. In 1968, Vidal covered the Democratic and Republican national conventions for ABC alongside conservative writer William F. Buckley. The two men were political opposites and their personalities  clashed to the point where Vidal instructed Buckley to "shut up a minute" and referred to him as a "crypto-Nazi.
OPINION
December 2, 2011
Bush's tax cuts Re "Bush-era tax cuts still loom large," Nov. 28 To Republicans who continue to protest the expiration of the Bush-era tax cuts for the most affluent Americans, based on the theory that tax cuts for wealthy business owners stimulate job growth: The theory isn't working. The cuts have been in place for a decade, yet unemployment has increased since 2007, and forecasts indicate it will remain at the present 9% rate until next year, if not longer.
OPINION
November 27, 2011 | By Carl T. Bogus
The modern conservative movement began 60 years ago with the publication of a book by a 26-year-old first-time author. Reflecting on that work teaches us something important about the nature and trajectory of modern conservatism, about the energy that propelled the movement and about serious problems with the movement today. The book was "God and Man at Yale. " The author was William F. Buckley Jr. GAMAY (as conservatives often call this iconic work) was an attack on the young author's alma mater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2011 | Elaine Woo
William A. Rusher, a leading theorist and organizer of the modern conservative movement who helped William F. Buckley Jr. build the National Review into one of the American right's most influential journals, died Saturday at a retirement home in San Francisco. He was 87. Rusher, who was also a syndicated columnist and author, died of causes related to old age, said Brian T. Kennedy, president of the Claremont Institute, a conservative think tank where Rusher had been a research fellow since 1989.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Author and humorist Christopher Buckley resigned from the National Review, a conservative magazine founded by his father, after readers complained about his endorsing Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama in an online publication. Buckley, son of the late William F. Buckley, made the endorsement on thedailybeast .com. He has worked as a speechwriter for Republican presidential nominee John McCain and President George H.W. Bush.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2008 | DON FREDERICK AND ANDREW MALCOLM
My memory of William F. Buckley Jr., the pioneering conservative writer who died at 82 last week while writing at his desk in Connecticut, is from the prime of his life -- but also about the end of life. It began with an unexpected phone call to my Tokyo home around 1977. The caller had that distinctive, erudite vocabulary; a wisp of a Southern accent; and patient cadence, as if . . . he . . . spoke . . . slowly . . . to . . . kindly . . . allow . . . me time to grasp his meaning.
TRAVEL
July 1, 1990
Rip Rense's article, "This Form of Orient Express Doesn't Make a Whole Lot of Sense," June 10, was interesting, clever and fun--all except the unnecessary, out-of-nowhere jibes at William F. Buckley and Vice President Dan Quayle. Please don't spoil your wonderful Travel Section with political opinions. Save them for the editorial pages. JAMES M. BRIGGS Tustin
NATIONAL
October 15, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Author and humorist Christopher Buckley resigned from the National Review, a conservative magazine founded by his father, after readers complained about his endorsing Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama in an online publication. Buckley, son of the late William F. Buckley, made the endorsement on thedailybeast .com. He has worked as a speechwriter for Republican presidential nominee John McCain and President George H.W. Bush.
OPINION
February 28, 2008 | Jacob Heilbrunn, Jacob Heilbrunn is a senior editor at the National Interest and the author of "They Knew They Were Right: the Rise of the Neocons."
By common consent, William F. Buckley Jr., who died Wednesday, was the father of modern conservatism. But he also ended up as one of the Bush administration's most trenchant critics. His death not only represents the loss of one of America's leading intellectual figures but also underscores the extent of the collapse of the conservative movement that has so decisively shaped politics for decades.
OPINION
February 28, 2008
William F. Buckley Jr., as anybody who has seen the great Buckley impressions by Joe Flaherty or Robin Williams can attest, was hardly inimitable. But the contributions of the National Review founder and long-serving icon of conservatism extended far beyond his personal style and charisma.
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