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April 26, 1994 | BARBARA ISENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When composer-lyricist William Finn first moved here in the late '70s, he used to pack everybody he knew into his apartment and literally put on a show. These days, he's still writing musicals in the same cluttered place on New York's Upper West Side. But his audiences don't fit into the bedroom and hallway anymore. First Off-Broadway, then on Broadway and around the country, Finn's idiosyncratic musicals have gone from cult favorites to honored mainstream entertainment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2011 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
William Finn and James Lapine count themselves among the millions of fans of the 2006 movie "Little Miss Sunshine. " But when they decided to adapt the story of the hapless Hoover family ? on the road from their unhappy Albuquerque home to a Redondo Beach junior beauty pageant ? for the musical stage, they had no intention of writing a carbon copy with a few songs thrown in. "What's the point of that?" ask Finn and Lapine ? at the same time. When the world premiere of "Little Miss Sunshine" opens Friday at the La Jolla Playhouse, the audience will see what Lapine calls "a very free adaptation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1998 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Despite a smooth rendering by director David Galligan, "Falsettos" at the St. Genesius demonstrates how quickly a piece of contemporary theater can show its age. Actually a combination of two separate musicals, "Falsettos," with music and lyrics by William Finn, book by Finn and James Lapine, is a 1992 Tony winner (for best score and book) that ran for more than a year on Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
People say things like, "C'mon, it isn't brain surgery," but some things are brain surgery. Riding high on the success of "Falsettos," in which he amalgamated two of his three "Marvin" musicals, profusely talented composer and lyricist William Finn suffered what was misdiagnosed initially as an inoperable brain tumor. The good news: Finn survived the surgery and then wrote about it.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1994 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Falsettos" has grown up. What a difference a dozen years make. William Finn and James Lapine might consider changing the title of their musical. "Falsettos"--voices above the normal range--no longer seems apropos. Most of the characters mature into adulthood in the second half of the musical, which had never been seen in Los Angeles until now. In 1982, the first half--then called "March of the Falsettos"--played what was then the Huntington Hartford Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
People say things like, "C'mon, it isn't brain surgery," but some things are brain surgery. Riding high on the success of "Falsettos," in which he amalgamated two of his three "Marvin" musicals, profusely talented composer and lyricist William Finn suffered what was misdiagnosed initially as an inoperable brain tumor. The good news: Finn survived the surgery and then wrote about it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2011 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
William Finn and James Lapine count themselves among the millions of fans of the 2006 movie "Little Miss Sunshine. " But when they decided to adapt the story of the hapless Hoover family ? on the road from their unhappy Albuquerque home to a Redondo Beach junior beauty pageant ? for the musical stage, they had no intention of writing a carbon copy with a few songs thrown in. "What's the point of that?" ask Finn and Lapine ? at the same time. When the world premiere of "Little Miss Sunshine" opens Friday at the La Jolla Playhouse, the audience will see what Lapine calls "a very free adaptation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2004 | Don Shirley
Did the hit documentary "Spellbound" make you want to get up on a stage and spell? Well, theatergoers in western Massachusetts this summer have an opportunity to do that. "25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee," a new musical that opened Thursday at the Barrington Stage Company, casts some audience members alongside six actors playing adolescent contestants in the titular event.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1990
I watched the sabotage of Limbaugh in disgust. Apparently satire is supposed to be the exclusive province of the left, to be dished out to the sacred cows of conservatives with glee, but never to be taken in kind. I have enjoyed the right-bashing comedy of the Smothers Brothers, Norman Lear and "Saturday Night Live" over the years, but it is refreshing to finally hear the volley returned--not by some Wally George pinhead but by an articulate wag with an ironic sense of pompous self-parody.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2001
* Madonna kicks off the first of four sold-out L.A. shows on Sept. 9 as her "Drowned World" tour arrives at the Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., L.A. Other dates are Sept. 11, 13 and 14. $45 to $250. (213) 742-7340.* The Fountain Theatre presents Maria Bermudez in "Sonidos Gitanos/Gypsy Flamenco" on Sept. 7, 8 and 9 at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre, 2580 Cahuenga Blvd. East, Hollywood. $30. (323) 461-3673.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1998 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Despite a smooth rendering by director David Galligan, "Falsettos" at the St. Genesius demonstrates how quickly a piece of contemporary theater can show its age. Actually a combination of two separate musicals, "Falsettos," with music and lyrics by William Finn, book by Finn and James Lapine, is a 1992 Tony winner (for best score and book) that ran for more than a year on Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1994 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Falsettos" has grown up. What a difference a dozen years make. William Finn and James Lapine might consider changing the title of their musical. "Falsettos"--voices above the normal range--no longer seems apropos. Most of the characters mature into adulthood in the second half of the musical, which had never been seen in Los Angeles until now. In 1982, the first half--then called "March of the Falsettos"--played what was then the Huntington Hartford Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1994 | BARBARA ISENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When composer-lyricist William Finn first moved here in the late '70s, he used to pack everybody he knew into his apartment and literally put on a show. These days, he's still writing musicals in the same cluttered place on New York's Upper West Side. But his audiences don't fit into the bedroom and hallway anymore. First Off-Broadway, then on Broadway and around the country, Finn's idiosyncratic musicals have gone from cult favorites to honored mainstream entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Might as well get it off the chest up front: UC Irvine's production of William Finn and James Lapine's "Falsettos" has it all over the Broadway production. There it is. There are several things to support this broad statement. One is the youth of the performers, their across-the-board glorious voices and their unqualified joy in their every moment on stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1993 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Falsetto : An artificially high voice, higher and thinner than a tenor's, says Webster's. "Falsettos": the quintessential musical for the 1990s, even though its first half is set in 1979 and its second in 1981. The word and the title connect briefly, as a wry symbol for homosexuality. But "Falsettos," the musical (its West Coast premiere was at the Old Globe Theatre on Thursday), is also the contraction of titles from what were once two shows--"March of the Falsettos" and "Falsettoland."
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