Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWilliam H Macy
IN THE NEWS

William H Macy

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1998 | STEVE HOCHMAN
You know his hangdog expression from "Fargo" and "Boogie Nights." Now you're learning William H. Macy's name via "Pleasantville" and "Psycho." Next up, he's paired with John Travolta in "A Civil Action" which opens Friday. The Chicago native, 48, started in theater with college pal David Mamet and would love to be a guest on ABC's "Sports Night," which features Felicity Huffman, his wife. FACING FACTS: "I wouldn't mind being the guy. Wouldn't mind getting the girl.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2013 | Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week of Jan. 6-12, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     CBS This Morning Author Trevor Aaronson. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Jenna Elfman; Oscars; Patti Stanger; Angela "Big Ang" Raiola. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America Rob Lowe; Oscars. (N) 7 a.m. KABC Rachael Ray Nate Berkus. (N) 8 a.m. KCAL Live With Kelly and Michael William H. Macy; Jenna Elfman. (N) 9 a.m. KABC The View Rob Lowe; Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2013 | Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week of Jan. 6-12, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     CBS This Morning Author Trevor Aaronson. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Jenna Elfman; Oscars; Patti Stanger; Angela "Big Ang" Raiola. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America Rob Lowe; Oscars. (N) 7 a.m. KABC Rachael Ray Nate Berkus. (N) 8 a.m. KCAL Live With Kelly and Michael William H. Macy; Jenna Elfman. (N) 9 a.m. KABC The View Rob Lowe; Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein.
NEWS
June 15, 2011 | By Randee Dawn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On one of New York City's first truly spring-like days, William H. Macy is hunkered down over a Caesar salad lunch at Gabriel's restaurant, talking TV. Not coincidentally, his wife, Felicity Huffman, is being quizzed elsewhere in the same establishment alongside her "Desperate Wives" costar Doug Savant. All in a day's work for the Macy/Huffman duo, which recently became a two-TV-star family when Macy premiered on Showtime in January with "Shameless. " As Frank, the drunken and largely shiftless papa to a clutch of kids who survive largely by their own wits, Macy couldn't be happier … even if he has to figure out how to get his hair to stay in place.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1999 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Memo to James Brown, the undisputed Godfather of Soul: Relax. William H. Macy is not, repeat, not trying to steal the title of the hardest-working man in show business. To be sure, the evidence that suggests otherwise is pretty daunting. Macy, the actor who came close to walking away with 1996's "Fargo" with his Oscar-nominated role as a hapless Minnesota car salesman caught up in a murder scheme, seems like he's in almost every movie that comes out.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1996 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Actor William H. Macy has an uncanny ability to disappear into his characters; it's something of a shock to scan his credits and learn that the ineptly murderous car salesman of "Fargo," the stern vice principal of "Mr. Holland's Opus," the chief of staff for "ER" and the volatile college professor in David Mamet's "Oleanna" were all brought to life by the same person. As estimable as his chameleonic talents may be, however, Macy is beginning to find it a little harder to blend into a crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2011 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Oscar-nominated actor William H. Macy, 60, takes on his first regular series role with "Shameless," Showtime's new dramedy also starring Emmy Rossum and Joan Cusack, which premieres Jan. 9. It's based on a British series created by executive producer Paul Abbott that he and John Wells adapted for American audiences. Your character, Frank Gallagher, is introduced with someone saying, "Who the hell is that?" A lot of people would consider him a pretty dreadful dad, but I get the sense that you love him. Am I right about that?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | Mark Sachs
William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman make quite the starry couple, but as Bill tells it, they're just plain old Hollywood Hills folks, with two daughters (Sofia, 8, and Georgia, 6) and a dog named Tucker. "We love entertaining and having game nights at our house," Macy says. "Running Charades is the game of choice right now, and there's a group that plays that has gotten quite vicious over the years." Their careers keep them busy too.
NEWS
June 15, 2011 | By Randee Dawn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On one of New York City's first truly spring-like days, William H. Macy is hunkered down over a Caesar salad lunch at Gabriel's restaurant, talking TV. Not coincidentally, his wife, Felicity Huffman, is being quizzed elsewhere in the same establishment alongside her "Desperate Wives" costar Doug Savant. All in a day's work for the Macy/Huffman duo, which recently became a two-TV-star family when Macy premiered on Showtime in January with "Shameless. " As Frank, the drunken and largely shiftless papa to a clutch of kids who survive largely by their own wits, Macy couldn't be happier … even if he has to figure out how to get his hair to stay in place.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
With Christmas just around the corner, the merchants of culture will soon be grabbing for your heartstrings, that they may tug upon them until the tears pour from your eyes and you want to buy their sponsors' soap. (The heartstring's connected to the purse string.) We will have orphans and misfits and crabby old men who won't understand the true meaning of the season until they're scared half out of their wits and/or suddenly touched by the love of a small child.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Randee Dawn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Long before she won her supporting actress Oscar for "The Fighter" at this year's Academy Awards, Melissa Leo was a television veteran. She played Kay Howard on "Homicide: Life on the Streets" for five seasons before largely moving on to feature films — and almost never looking back. But on the set of 2003's "21 Grams," she had an epiphany. "I was working with Sean Penn and Naomi Watts, and it dawned on me that while I was intimidated by working with [top level] film stars, it occurred to me that more eyes had probably seen me on the smaller screen than had seen them on the big screen," she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2011 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
If you decide, as Showtime executives did, to debut a comedy about how impossible it is to make a good American version of a British television show (because Hollywood is hopelessly corrupt and Americans are morons) on the very same night you premiere an American remake of a hit British drama, you had better be quite sure that the first show is very smart and the second very good. Otherwise you, like Showtime, will find yourself proving with one what you hoped to satirize with the second.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2011 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Oscar-nominated actor William H. Macy, 60, takes on his first regular series role with "Shameless," Showtime's new dramedy also starring Emmy Rossum and Joan Cusack, which premieres Jan. 9. It's based on a British series created by executive producer Paul Abbott that he and John Wells adapted for American audiences. Your character, Frank Gallagher, is introduced with someone saying, "Who the hell is that?" A lot of people would consider him a pretty dreadful dad, but I get the sense that you love him. Am I right about that?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
What would you wish for if you found a rainbow-colored rock that told you to make a wish, then granted every one? Would you go for world peace, a million bucks? Or like the kids in "Shorts," would you wish for a castle and a moat protected by snakes and alligators, not realizing the complications that might crop up? Me, I'd wish that writer-director Robert Rodriguez, who brought us the finely wrought darkness of "Sin City," would set aside the kid stuff and get back to the promise of his earlier work . . . right after world peace and a million bucks.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | Mark Sachs
William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman make quite the starry couple, but as Bill tells it, they're just plain old Hollywood Hills folks, with two daughters (Sofia, 8, and Georgia, 6) and a dog named Tucker. "We love entertaining and having game nights at our house," Macy says. "Running Charades is the game of choice right now, and there's a group that plays that has gotten quite vicious over the years." Their careers keep them busy too.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
With Christmas just around the corner, the merchants of culture will soon be grabbing for your heartstrings, that they may tug upon them until the tears pour from your eyes and you want to buy their sponsors' soap. (The heartstring's connected to the purse string.) We will have orphans and misfits and crabby old men who won't understand the true meaning of the season until they're scared half out of their wits and/or suddenly touched by the love of a small child.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2003 | Ellen Baskin
Bernie LOOTZ, the title character portrayed by William H. Macy in "The Cooler," has such contagiously bad luck that his mere presence on the casino floor is certain to freeze a hot winning streak. Macy, on the other hand, proclaims himself "a good-luck guy." His grandmother long ago labeled him "a serendipidist, one to whom good things happen. And it's been true my whole life."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
What would you wish for if you found a rainbow-colored rock that told you to make a wish, then granted every one? Would you go for world peace, a million bucks? Or like the kids in "Shorts," would you wish for a castle and a moat protected by snakes and alligators, not realizing the complications that might crop up? Me, I'd wish that writer-director Robert Rodriguez, who brought us the finely wrought darkness of "Sin City," would set aside the kid stuff and get back to the promise of his earlier work . . . right after world peace and a million bucks.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2003 | Ellen Baskin
Bernie LOOTZ, the title character portrayed by William H. Macy in "The Cooler," has such contagiously bad luck that his mere presence on the casino floor is certain to freeze a hot winning streak. Macy, on the other hand, proclaims himself "a good-luck guy." His grandmother long ago labeled him "a serendipidist, one to whom good things happen. And it's been true my whole life."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1999 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Memo to James Brown, the undisputed Godfather of Soul: Relax. William H. Macy is not, repeat, not trying to steal the title of the hardest-working man in show business. To be sure, the evidence that suggests otherwise is pretty daunting. Macy, the actor who came close to walking away with 1996's "Fargo" with his Oscar-nominated role as a hapless Minnesota car salesman caught up in a murder scheme, seems like he's in almost every movie that comes out.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|