Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWilliam H Rehnquist
IN THE NEWS

William H Rehnquist

NEWS
August 12, 1995 | From Associated Press
The nation's chief justice cleared the way for Shannon Faulkner to report to The Citadel this morning as the first female cadet in the school's 152-year history. Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist on Friday rejected an emergency request from the state-run military school to keep her out. The Citadel made a last-ditch appeal to Justice Antonin Scalia, but he rejected the request without comment late Friday. Scalia could have granted the request or referred the matter to the full court.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Presiding over the Senate trial was a bit of a "culture shock," William H. Rehnquist said Friday as he completed his duties as only the second chief justice to oversee a presidential impeachment trial. "I leave you now a wiser, but not a sadder, man," Rehnquist told senators shortly after pronouncing President Clinton "not guilty as charged" on both impeachment articles. For each article of impeachment, a clerk read the charges aloud, then Rehnquist said: "Senators, how say you?
NATIONAL
February 19, 2005 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, undergoing treatment for thyroid cancer, will not be on the bench when the Supreme Court returns next week for the second half of its current term, the court announced Friday. Court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg said Rehnquist would continue to participate in court business from home, reading briefs and transcripts of arguments, taking part in justices' conferences and voting on cases. Rehnquist's last appearance in an official capacity was Jan.
OPINION
May 22, 2004
How interesting that in "From Law Clerk to Chief Justice, He Has Slighted Rights" (Commentary, May 17), Cass Sunstein states that the memo penned by then law clerk William H. Rehnquist was uncannily prescient. This, of course, is in reference to the present-day "sentiments of a transient majority of nine men" (oh, that should, of course, be nine persons). One thing that he can be called prophetic about, his statement that "attempts ... to protect minority rights" by the Supreme Court over 150 years "have all met the same fate ... and crept silently to rest," would indicate that any conservative agenda that Chief Justice Rehnquist may now be pushing will be swept away in just a few generations because of the cyclical nature of the Supreme Court.
NEWS
January 1, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, in his year-end report on the judiciary, faulted Congress on Thursday for turning local offenses into federal crimes, a trend that he said has overburdened the nation's courts. Last year, the number of new crime cases in the federal judiciary rose by 15%, he said, the largest increase in nearly three decades. The rise was propelled mostly by drug and immigration cases, he added.
NATIONAL
July 14, 2005 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, who is battling thyroid cancer, remained hospitalized Wednesday after being admitted a day earlier because of a fever. Rehnquist, taken by ambulance to a Virginia hospital, "was admitted for observation and tests," said Kathy Arberg, the Supreme Court's spokeswoman. She gave no further details on his condition and said Wednesday that she did not know when he would be released.
NEWS
January 21, 2001 | From The Washington Post
Just weeks after the controversial Supreme Court decision that ended manual recounts in Florida's presidential voting--effectively awarding the White House to George W. Bush--Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist gave a little-noticed history lecture suggesting that sometimes members of the court may have to become involved in political matters to prevent national crisis.
NEWS
February 16, 1987 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
Saying that the federal courts are being swamped by "more and more cases of less and less importance," Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia on Sunday proposed a major restructuring of the federal judiciary that would move the nation toward a system of specialized national courts. In a speech to the American Bar Assn., Scalia portrayed a once-elite federal court system that is being crushed under the weight of an enormous caseload.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
Supreme Court Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, addressing a rare press conference, warned Wednesday that the caliber of the judiciary will deteriorate unless Congress moves quickly to raise the salaries of federal judges.
NEWS
August 14, 1986 | United Press International
The Senate Judiciary Committee gave President Reagan a double victory in his efforts to remake the Supreme Court in his image today by approving William H. Rehnquist as chief justice and Antonin Scalia to replace him as associate justice. The committee approved Rehnquist on a 13-5 vote to be the nation's 16th chief justice despite opposition from Democrats who said he was not candid about his racial views. The panel gave Scalia, a federal appeals court judge, its unanimous approval, 18 to 0.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|