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William H Rehnquist

NEWS
January 20, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
Today will mark the first inaugural swearing-in carried out by Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, a man far more attuned to intellectual work inside the Supreme Court than to the public, ceremonial aspects of his job. When Rehnquist administers the oath of office to President-elect Bush, he will take over the duties long performed by his immediate predecessor, Chief Justice Warren E.
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NATIONAL
August 5, 2005 | David Savage, Times Staff Writer
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, who is fighting thyroid cancer, developed a fever Thursday and was taken for evaluation to a Virginia hospital, a Supreme Court spokesman said. He was allowed to go home after undergoing tests at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington, spokesman Ed Turner said. It was the second time this summer that the 80-year-old chief justice had gone to the hospital with a fever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1986
Your editorial (Aug. 13), "Tale of Two Justices," smacks of a call for civil disobedience. You agree that those who argue against William H. Rehnquist and Rose Elizabeth Bird are "constitutionally correct" in their rights to decide the former's promotion and the latter's continued stay in office. Yet you hedge by stating, "But the nation and the state should be very careful about using these procedures, constitutionally defensible though they are." In other words, forget the Constitution; it doesn't conform to The Times' point of view.
NATIONAL
November 27, 2004 | From Associated Press
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist will be absent from the Supreme Court on Monday, beginning a sixth week of missed work caused by thyroid cancer. The 80-year-old has been receiving chemotherapy and radiation treatment at home and plans to skip the two-week cycle of arguments that starts Monday, a court spokesman said Friday. No other information was available. Little has been made public about the seriousness of Rehnquist's cancer, which was announced in a terse statement Oct. 25.
NEWS
August 12, 1995 | From Associated Press
The nation's chief justice cleared the way for Shannon Faulkner to report to The Citadel this morning as the first female cadet in the school's 152-year history. Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist on Friday rejected an emergency request from the state-run military school to keep her out. The Citadel made a last-ditch appeal to Justice Antonin Scalia, but he rejected the request without comment late Friday. Scalia could have granted the request or referred the matter to the full court.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Presiding over the Senate trial was a bit of a "culture shock," William H. Rehnquist said Friday as he completed his duties as only the second chief justice to oversee a presidential impeachment trial. "I leave you now a wiser, but not a sadder, man," Rehnquist told senators shortly after pronouncing President Clinton "not guilty as charged" on both impeachment articles. For each article of impeachment, a clerk read the charges aloud, then Rehnquist said: "Senators, how say you?
OPINION
May 22, 2004
How interesting that in "From Law Clerk to Chief Justice, He Has Slighted Rights" (Commentary, May 17), Cass Sunstein states that the memo penned by then law clerk William H. Rehnquist was uncannily prescient. This, of course, is in reference to the present-day "sentiments of a transient majority of nine men" (oh, that should, of course, be nine persons). One thing that he can be called prophetic about, his statement that "attempts ... to protect minority rights" by the Supreme Court over 150 years "have all met the same fate ... and crept silently to rest," would indicate that any conservative agenda that Chief Justice Rehnquist may now be pushing will be swept away in just a few generations because of the cyclical nature of the Supreme Court.
NEWS
May 23, 1993 | from Associated Press
Universities should not suppress unpopular views but instead expose students to the "marketplace of ideas," Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist said Saturday during a commencement speech at George Mason University.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2005 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, undergoing treatment for thyroid cancer, will not be on the bench when the Supreme Court returns next week for the second half of its current term, the court announced Friday. Court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg said Rehnquist would continue to participate in court business from home, reading briefs and transcripts of arguments, taking part in justices' conferences and voting on cases. Rehnquist's last appearance in an official capacity was Jan.
NEWS
January 1, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, in his year-end report on the judiciary, faulted Congress on Thursday for turning local offenses into federal crimes, a trend that he said has overburdened the nation's courts. Last year, the number of new crime cases in the federal judiciary rose by 15%, he said, the largest increase in nearly three decades. The rise was propelled mostly by drug and immigration cases, he added.
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