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William H Rehnquist

NATIONAL
June 8, 2003 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
After a winter drive across the upper Midwest in an unheated Studebaker, a 27-year-old Stanford law graduate arrived at the Supreme Court on Feb. 1, 1952. It was his first day as a law clerk, and his first glimpse of the grand white-marble facade of the high court. But he was no ordinary rookie, awed and unsure of himself. William H.
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NATIONAL
May 19, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist is not exactly cuddly, but he is a real doll. The impassive visage of the Supreme Court leader is now depicted on a bobble-head figurine. The doll is the brainchild of the editors at a small legal journal who intend it as an admittedly peculiar tribute to the 78-year-old jurist in what may be his last year on the bench.
NATIONAL
January 1, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist used his year-end report on federal courts to plead for help for what he says are overworked and underpaid judges. In a softer tone than in 2001, Rehnquist said he hoped Congress would recognize that top federal judges are fleeing to better-paying private jobs.
NATIONAL
November 27, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist underwent surgery Tuesday to repair a knee injury he suffered in a fall at his home Thursday, a spokeswoman for the Supreme Court said. Doctors at Walter Reed Army Medical Center repaired a torn quadriceps tendon in the chief justice's right leg, the spokeswoman, Kathy Arberg, said. Rehnquist, 78, was "resting comfortably" and will begin physical therapy soon, Arberg said.
NATIONAL
June 30, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the Supreme Court, long membership has its rewards. Since the mid-1970s, William H. Rehnquist and John Paul Stevens have staked out opposing views on many of the biggest issues that come before the Supreme Court: religion, the death penalty, civil rights, abortion, crime and punishment, and states' rights. Now, Rehnquist, 77, and Stevens, 82, are enjoying the peaks of their influence, swaying the court in the term that ended last week to some of their most cherished goals.
NEWS
September 26, 2001 | David G. Savage
In decades past, the Supreme Court met through the last week of September for what was known as the "long conference." The nine justices gathered to sift through the 1,700 or so appeals that had arrived over the summer and voted on which ones to review. Since Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist took over, however, the conference lasts but a few hours on a Monday morning. He insists that his colleagues come prepared and ready to vote in rapid succession, with a minimum of discussion.
NEWS
May 15, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist lashed out at critics of expenses-paid, out-of-town conferences for federal judges, saying the trips provide valuable education for people who work hard. Businesses and various lobbying interests sponsor conferences for federal judges, paying air fare, hotel and other expenses. Last week, U.S. Supreme Court justices were scattered from Alaska to Georgia, speaking to bar associations and other lawyers' groups.
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | KATHLEEN HOWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supreme Court Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and leaders of two of the nation's largest lawyers' associations joined Tuesday in pushing for higher salaries for federal judges. Rehnquist appeared with the presidents of the American Bar Assn. and the Federal Bar Assn., who presented a report warning that salary levels on the federal bench "have reached such levels of inadequacy that they threaten to impair the quality and independence" of the judiciary.
NEWS
January 21, 2001 | From The Washington Post
Just weeks after the controversial Supreme Court decision that ended manual recounts in Florida's presidential voting--effectively awarding the White House to George W. Bush--Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist gave a little-noticed history lecture suggesting that sometimes members of the court may have to become involved in political matters to prevent national crisis.
NEWS
January 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
Only weeks after legal experts questioned whether the Supreme Court's Florida recount ruling might be political, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist said he hoped the U.S. court system "will seldom, if ever" become embroiled in another presidential election. Rehnquist's annual report to Congress on the U.S. judiciary did not mention the criticism leveled against the high court.
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