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William H Rehnquist

NATIONAL
June 30, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the Supreme Court, long membership has its rewards. Since the mid-1970s, William H. Rehnquist and John Paul Stevens have staked out opposing views on many of the biggest issues that come before the Supreme Court: religion, the death penalty, civil rights, abortion, crime and punishment, and states' rights. Now, Rehnquist, 77, and Stevens, 82, are enjoying the peaks of their influence, swaying the court in the term that ended last week to some of their most cherished goals.
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NEWS
September 26, 2001 | David G. Savage
In decades past, the Supreme Court met through the last week of September for what was known as the "long conference." The nine justices gathered to sift through the 1,700 or so appeals that had arrived over the summer and voted on which ones to review. Since Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist took over, however, the conference lasts but a few hours on a Monday morning. He insists that his colleagues come prepared and ready to vote in rapid succession, with a minimum of discussion.
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | KATHLEEN HOWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supreme Court Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and leaders of two of the nation's largest lawyers' associations joined Tuesday in pushing for higher salaries for federal judges. Rehnquist appeared with the presidents of the American Bar Assn. and the Federal Bar Assn., who presented a report warning that salary levels on the federal bench "have reached such levels of inadequacy that they threaten to impair the quality and independence" of the judiciary.
NEWS
January 21, 2001 | From The Washington Post
Just weeks after the controversial Supreme Court decision that ended manual recounts in Florida's presidential voting--effectively awarding the White House to George W. Bush--Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist gave a little-noticed history lecture suggesting that sometimes members of the court may have to become involved in political matters to prevent national crisis.
NEWS
January 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
Only weeks after legal experts questioned whether the Supreme Court's Florida recount ruling might be political, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist said he hoped the U.S. court system "will seldom, if ever" become embroiled in another presidential election. Rehnquist's annual report to Congress on the U.S. judiciary did not mention the criticism leveled against the high court.
NEWS
December 13, 2000
Chief Justice Rehnquist, with whom Justice Scalia and Justice Thomas join, concurring. We join the per curiam opinion. We write separately because we believe there are additional grounds that require us to reverse the Florida Supreme Court's decision. * I We deal here not with an ordinary election, but with an election for the President of the United States. In Burroughs v. United States, 290 U. S.
NEWS
October 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A batch of secretly taped Nixon administration tapes released last week by the National Archives record President Nixon and his aides exulting over good press given to his nomination of William H. Rehnquist for the Supreme Court. On Oct. 27, 1971, Chief of Staff H.R. Haldeman marveled at the timing, coming after two other nominees had been voted down by the Senate's Democratic majority after a hard fight.
NEWS
January 1, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Say what you will, the 20th century has been a good one for litigation. In 1999, 320,194 cases were filed in federal district courts, a 23-fold increase over the year 1900 when 13,605 cases were filed, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist said in his year-end report on the judiciary. In addition, another 1.3 million federal bankruptcy petitions were filed. And this century, "I hasten to point out, has another year to run. Just ask the makers of '2001: A Space Odyssey,' " Rehnquist added.
NEWS
September 27, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backed by four fellow conservatives, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist will resume leading a quiet constitutional revolution-in-the-making as the Supreme Court begins its new term next week. In a series of rulings since 1995, he has revived the once-discredited doctrine of states' rights and reined in the power of the national government. No one at the high court rhapsodizes about "building a bridge to the 21st century" or marvels at how computers are creating a global economy.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Presiding over the Senate trial was a bit of a "culture shock," William H. Rehnquist said Friday as he completed his duties as only the second chief justice to oversee a presidential impeachment trial. "I leave you now a wiser, but not a sadder, man," Rehnquist told senators shortly after pronouncing President Clinton "not guilty as charged" on both impeachment articles. For each article of impeachment, a clerk read the charges aloud, then Rehnquist said: "Senators, how say you?
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