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William J Hunt

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2005 | Jean O. Pasco and Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writers
In 1997, a young and relatively unknown lawman brashly challenged the reelection of Orange County's popular incumbent sheriff, declaring that it was time for a change. As it turned out, longtime Sheriff Brad Gates bowed out of the 1998 race and retired, and Michael S. Carona, the upstart county marshal whose primary job was ensuring public safety inside courthouses, was elected sheriff over the Santa Ana police chief.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2008 | Christine Hanley and Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writers
Based on polls of voters and their rank-and-file members, leaders of the Assn. of Orange County Deputy Sheriffs said Tuesday they would ask county supervisors to appoint former Lt. Bill Hunt to replace Michael S. Carona as the next sheriff.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2008 | Christine Hanley and Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writers
The state attorney general is reviewing whether interim Orange County Sheriff Jack Anderson broke the law by appearing in uniform while trying to dissuade the San Clemente City Council from endorsing a former sheriff's lieutenant as a replacement for indicted Sheriff Michael S. Carona, who later resigned. During a council meeting in November, shortly after Carona was indicted on corruption charges, Anderson, then an assistant sheriff, told the council members that Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2008 | Christine Hanley and Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writers
The state attorney general is reviewing whether interim Orange County Sheriff Jack Anderson broke the law by appearing in uniform while trying to dissuade the San Clemente City Council from endorsing a former sheriff's lieutenant as a replacement for indicted Sheriff Michael S. Carona, who later resigned. During a council meeting in November, shortly after Carona was indicted on corruption charges, Anderson, then an assistant sheriff, told the council members that Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2006 | Garrett Therolf, Times Staff Writer
These are lonely days for the chief. Four months ago, Lt. Bill Hunt was locked in a bitter and messy political showdown with his boss, Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona. Now Hunt, suspended from his job the day after the election, is admittedly bored. He's grown a goatee, developed a tan and rarely wears anything more formal than an "FBI Gym" T-shirt and shorts. When the cellphone rings to the theme song of television's "SWAT," it's just his attorney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2008 | Christine Hanley and Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writers
Based on polls of voters and their rank-and-file members, leaders of the Assn. of Orange County Deputy Sheriffs said Tuesday they would ask county supervisors to appoint former Lt. Bill Hunt to replace Michael S. Carona as the next sheriff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2005 | Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writer
An Orange County sheriff's captain was charged Tuesday with illegally soliciting 16 colleagues for donations to the reelection campaign of Sheriff Michael S. Carona. The state attorney general's office charged Capt. Christine Murray with 16 misdemeanor counts of soliciting political contributions from other Sheriff's Department employees. She is to be formally arraigned Sept. 28.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2005 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona tapped two longtime department veterans Friday to become his new assistants -- a position that became a source of controversy. One of his former assistants, George Jaramillo, is facing bribery charges. A second, Donald Haidl, resigned earlier this year to focus on his son's legal problems. Both were Carona confidantes who came from outside the rank and file of the Sheriff's Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2005 | Christine Hanley and Jean Pasco, Times Staff Writers
A top deputy to Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona announced Friday that he will retire next month, becoming the second assistant sheriff in a week to depart abruptly. Assistant Sheriff Doug Storm, a 32-year veteran who had talked publicly and to colleagues about retiring this winter or next year, will step down Sept. 2, according to a one-page resignation letter he sent to Carona and division commanders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2005 | Christine Hanley and Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writers
A 32-year veteran of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is the second candidate to declare that he'll take on Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona next year. Sheriff's Commander Ralph W. Martin, who heads a patrol division overseeing about 2,000 employees, has not previously sought elected office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2006 | Garrett Therolf, Times Staff Writer
These are lonely days for the chief. Four months ago, Lt. Bill Hunt was locked in a bitter and messy political showdown with his boss, Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona. Now Hunt, suspended from his job the day after the election, is admittedly bored. He's grown a goatee, developed a tan and rarely wears anything more formal than an "FBI Gym" T-shirt and shorts. When the cellphone rings to the theme song of television's "SWAT," it's just his attorney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2005 | Jean O. Pasco and Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writers
In 1997, a young and relatively unknown lawman brashly challenged the reelection of Orange County's popular incumbent sheriff, declaring that it was time for a change. As it turned out, longtime Sheriff Brad Gates bowed out of the 1998 race and retired, and Michael S. Carona, the upstart county marshal whose primary job was ensuring public safety inside courthouses, was elected sheriff over the Santa Ana police chief.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1998
Regarding, "The Choice for Sheriff" (editorial, May 17): The Times missed the mark by a millennium due to the failure to give the proper weight to the very important character issues: Loyalty: It appears that Paul Walters abandoned his friend Mike Carona for selfish ambition and did not have the fortitude to tell him. If friends cannot trust someone the voters cannot trust them. Courage: Mike Carona had the courage to challenge the invincible incumbent; his opponent apparently lacked that courage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2002 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Religious institutions cannot be held liable for discriminating against employees on the basis of religion, the California Supreme Court ruled unanimously Thursday. The state high court threw out a lawsuit by an evangelical Christian who was fired from a Catholic medical foundation after he proselytized to other employees. The court held that the U.S.
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