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William J Rea

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city attorney's office asked a federal judge Wednesday for permission to appeal his unprecedented ruling allowing the Los Angeles Police Department to be sued under an anti-racketeering law. A lawyer for the city told U.S. District Judge William J. Rea that his ruling "is without legal support and is contrary to the controlling authority" of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and other federal courts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2005 | David Rosenzweig, Times Staff Writer
U.S. District Judge William J. Rea, who earned a reputation for independence and decency during more than 20 years on the federal bench, died Wednesday from an apparent heart attack. He was 85. Rea died while recuperating from surgery at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica, a court spokesperson said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2005 | David Rosenzweig, Times Staff Writer
U.S. District Judge William J. Rea, who earned a reputation for independence and decency during more than 20 years on the federal bench, died Wednesday from an apparent heart attack. He was 85. Rea died while recuperating from surgery at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica, a court spokesperson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city attorney's office asked a federal judge Wednesday for permission to appeal his unprecedented ruling allowing the Los Angeles Police Department to be sued under an anti-racketeering law. A lawyer for the city told U.S. District Judge William J. Rea that his ruling "is without legal support and is contrary to the controlling authority" of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and other federal courts.
NEWS
May 27, 1985 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
This isn't Burger King. We don't do it your way here. --Judge Manuel L. Real's favorite saying. The courtroom confrontation took place more than 30 years ago, but the most controversial federal judge in Los Angeles remembers it today as an early lesson in judicial style. Chief U.S. District Judge Manuel L. Real, then a young prosecutor, had decided that his only chance of winning a conviction before an unsympathetic judge was to demand a jury trial. But U.S. District Judge Pierson M.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1987
In a hearing before U.S. District Judge William J. Rea, reputed organized crime figure Salvatore Pisello pleaded not guilty to three counts of income tax evasion. Bail was set at $50,000, with a jury trial set for Sept. 29.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1985
Responding to a lawsuit filed by the Federal Trade Commission, U.S. District Judge William J. Rea also appointed attorney Robert Baker to act as receiver for the Century City-based telephone application sales firm. The FTC contended that the company, which prepares applications for cellular telephone lotteries that the FCC conducts, misrepresented its operations to customers. Company President Michael Godfree called the FTC case against his company "baseless and without merit."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1988
A Mission Viejo businessman who pleaded guilty to tax evasion this week was placed on three years' probation, fined $10,000 and ordered to perform 1,000 hours of community service. John H. Fuller, 53, chief executive of Plant Equipment Inc. of Temecula, was sentenced by U.S. District Judge William J. Rea in Los Angeles. Fuller was convicted of funneling $100,000 in company funds to himself with a dummy firm and fake invoices paid by Plant Equipment.
NEWS
October 8, 1987
A federal judge dismissed a $1-million lawsuit filed by an Oxnard firefighter who claimed that he was intimidated and kept out of work for two months because of his campaign to have the department provide separate living quarters for the two female firefighters in the Ventura County city. David Leaf, 34, claimed that sharing facilities with the women caused him to feel "intimidated" and "sexually aroused," but U.S. District Judge William J. Rea ruled that his civil rights had not been violated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2000
The controller of Founders National Bank, Los Angeles' only black-owned and black-operated commercial bank, pleaded guilty in federal court Friday to misappropriating nearly $413,000. Siriluck Hastanand, 47, of La Canada Flintridge admitted transferring the money from the bank's internal accounts to a savings account she held in trust for her daughter. Federal prosecutors said she made 46 money transfers from 1991 through 1997.
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