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William Johnson

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NEWS
November 4, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Weber Johnson, a teacher, journalist and historian who specialized in writing about Mexico, the rugged Old West and the characters who prowled those colorful lands, has died. Johnson, a former Time-Life reporter, was 82 when he died in a San Diego hospital. His wife, Elizabeth, told the Associated Press he had died Monday of complications of emphysema. Johnson was the author of 11 books, among them a 1960 biography he called "Kelly Blue."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2013 | By Daniel Siegal, Los Angeles Times
William Johnson has been fighting for several years to keep his small farm alive, but the General Plan that the city of La Cañada Flintridge is getting ready to adopt won't do him any favors. It appears likely that Johnson will be forced to close his operation and perhaps tear out a 475-tree persimmon grove. Johnson has owned his 67-acre parcel along Angeles Crest Highway in the hills above La Cañada Flintridge since about 1997. He also makes use of 11 acres owned by Southern California Edison.
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BUSINESS
June 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
H.J. Heinz Co. agreed to buy the HP Foods and Lea & Perrins sauce divisions from Groupe Danone of France for $852 million in a move that one analyst says positions Heinz to possibly gain global control of the sauce market. Danone's sauce brands, marketed primarily in Britain, the U.S. and Canada, accounted for close to $292 million in revenue last year, Danone said.
BOOKS
December 18, 2005 | Michael O'Donnell, Michael O'Donnell is a writer and lawyer.
IN a 1990 essay on Billy the Kid, Irish writer and critic Fintan O'Toole observed, "For Britain, the Irish are the Indians to the far west, circling the wagons of imperial civilization. Once in America, of course, the Irish cease to be the Indians and become the cowboys. They are the Indian killers and the clearers of the wilderness." What, then, are we to make of Sir William Johnson, England's Irish-born, 18th century emissary to Native Americans?
SPORTS
October 18, 1986
I had to laugh at the letter from John Wolcott (Viewpoint, Oct. 11) about this being the time to praise Ted Tollner. After seeing the Trojans fall apart in the second half against Oregon and then continue the collapse in the embarrassing loss to mediocre Washington State, I have to wonder if Ted Tollner continues to have any supporters. The Washington State debacle was USC's ninth 20-points-or-greater loss in his 3 1/2 years. In the preceding 20 years, there were only six such losses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1986
A 46-year-old San Diego man was charged Friday with using stolen Medi-Cal cards to illegally obtain prescription drugs and with bilking the Medi-Cal program of more than $50,000 over the last three years. William Johnson is being held in the County Jail downtown and his bail is set at $14,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2013 | By Daniel Siegal, Los Angeles Times
William Johnson has been fighting for several years to keep his small farm alive, but the General Plan that the city of La Cañada Flintridge is getting ready to adopt won't do him any favors. It appears likely that Johnson will be forced to close his operation and perhaps tear out a 475-tree persimmon grove. Johnson has owned his 67-acre parcel along Angeles Crest Highway in the hills above La Cañada Flintridge since about 1997. He also makes use of 11 acres owned by Southern California Edison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2001
In "The Next Casualty: Bill of Rights?" (Commentary, Sept. 13), Alexander Cockburn decried the "stupidity and blindness" of most mainstream political commentary undertaken in the immediate aftermath of Tuesday's tragedy. Ironically, however, in the same column, Cockburn provided perhaps the most stupid and blind bit of commentary thus far: namely, his suggestion that President Bush and his aides were "wit"-less for taking Air Force One through a circuitous, daylong route back to Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1986 | DOUG SMITH
In the drab but serviceable setting of the Reseda High School auditorium, the San Fernando Valley Symphony staged a revival Saturday night that its backers hope will begin a new era of prosperity based on a solid business foundation. By way of review, the orchestra, after 37 consecutive years of often distinguished concert seasons, folded abruptly in the middle of its 1984 season. Its president said it was no longer possible to manage the orchestra's growing debt.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1989 | RIP RENSE, Rense is a Sherman Oaks free-lance writer. and
As an orchestral conductor, Lois Johnson has accomplished at least one feat that maestros such as Leonard Bernstein and Zubin Mehta will never equal. "I conducted when I was 7 1/2 months pregnant," Johnson said. "It's a real trick." Johnson is the 30-year-old music director of the San Fernando Valley Symphony Orchestra, a group that in its 42 years has never really been taken too seriously by serious music lovers; a group that used to be a good place for college music majors to get in a little practice and amateurs to have a little fun. A group that would have disappeared entirely in 1985, but for the intervention of Johnson and her husband, William.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
H.J. Heinz Co. agreed to buy the HP Foods and Lea & Perrins sauce divisions from Groupe Danone of France for $852 million in a move that one analyst says positions Heinz to possibly gain global control of the sauce market. Danone's sauce brands, marketed primarily in Britain, the U.S. and Canada, accounted for close to $292 million in revenue last year, Danone said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2001
In "The Next Casualty: Bill of Rights?" (Commentary, Sept. 13), Alexander Cockburn decried the "stupidity and blindness" of most mainstream political commentary undertaken in the immediate aftermath of Tuesday's tragedy. Ironically, however, in the same column, Cockburn provided perhaps the most stupid and blind bit of commentary thus far: namely, his suggestion that President Bush and his aides were "wit"-less for taking Air Force One through a circuitous, daylong route back to Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
The rediscovery of a gifted but mostly forgotten historical artist is a difficult process. Success doesn't rest on intrinsic merit alone. Timing counts. The timing might be right for William H. Johnson (1901-1970). The 19 paintings and like number of works on paper currently at Steve Turner Gallery record the compelling trajectory of a painter whose development to maturity was remarkably rapid and whose career was brief, cut short by war and personal tragedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
As exhibition titles go, "William H. Johnson: Truth Be Told" is loaded with implications. Los Angeles art dealer Steve Turner, who organized the show and came up with its provocative name, wants his audience to know that the truth has not been told about his subject. The exhibition has arrived in Southern California after a national museum tour, as the inaugural event at Turner's new gallery in Beverly Hills.
NEWS
August 26, 1995
William S. Johnson, 82, Stanford professor of organic chemistry who earned the National Medal of Science. Johnson received the coveted prize in 1987 from President Ronald Reagan for "outstanding achievements in organic synthesis." Johnson devised efficient ways to make several chemical compounds, including steroids, vitamins and hormones.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Weber Johnson, a teacher, journalist and historian who specialized in writing about Mexico, the rugged Old West and the characters who prowled those colorful lands, has died. Johnson, a former Time-Life reporter, was 82 when he died in a San Diego hospital. His wife, Elizabeth, told the Associated Press he had died Monday of complications of emphysema. Johnson was the author of 11 books, among them a 1960 biography he called "Kelly Blue."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1986
During the past several days your paper has offered several articles on the life and death of Bishop William R. Johnson. As a member of his flock, I want to thank you for publicly celebrating the gift this man was to each and every one of us. There are many times and occasions when one can readily see and hear the word of God preached and shared on doorsteps, radio, and television. However, Bishop Johnson used none of these. Instead, like the quiet wind that was the voice of the Lord to Elijah, he was for us shepherd, priest, brother and friend.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | CAROLYN THOMPSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As a teen-ager who would be lobotomized just a few years later, Rosemary Kennedy chronicled a life of tea dances, dress fittings and trips to Europe in diaries that her mother ordered tossed out with the trash. But Rose Kennedy's secretary didn't listen. She hung on to the aging leather-bound journals and included them in a new book about her decade with the Kennedy clan. Rosemary, now 76, has been living in obscurity in a Wisconsin convent school since the 1941 lobotomy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1989 | RIP RENSE, Rense is a Sherman Oaks free-lance writer. and
As an orchestral conductor, Lois Johnson has accomplished at least one feat that maestros such as Leonard Bernstein and Zubin Mehta will never equal. "I conducted when I was 7 1/2 months pregnant," Johnson said. "It's a real trick." Johnson is the 30-year-old music director of the San Fernando Valley Symphony Orchestra, a group that in its 42 years has never really been taken too seriously by serious music lovers; a group that used to be a good place for college music majors to get in a little practice and amateurs to have a little fun. A group that would have disappeared entirely in 1985, but for the intervention of Johnson and her husband, William.
SPORTS
October 18, 1986
I had to laugh at the letter from John Wolcott (Viewpoint, Oct. 11) about this being the time to praise Ted Tollner. After seeing the Trojans fall apart in the second half against Oregon and then continue the collapse in the embarrassing loss to mediocre Washington State, I have to wonder if Ted Tollner continues to have any supporters. The Washington State debacle was USC's ninth 20-points-or-greater loss in his 3 1/2 years. In the preceding 20 years, there were only six such losses.
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