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William L Webster

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NEWS
October 19, 1992 | From Times' staff and wire reports
WEBSTER'S WOES: Missouri Atty. Gen. William L. Webster gained wide name recognition as the prosecutor in a landmark 1989 Supreme Court decision, Webster vs. Reproductive Services, that bolstered states' authority to regulate abortions. But the conservative Republican's gubernatorial campaign has foundered this fall--and abortion has had little to do with it. . . . Democratic Lt. Gov.
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NEWS
October 19, 1992 | From Times' staff and wire reports
WEBSTER'S WOES: Missouri Atty. Gen. William L. Webster gained wide name recognition as the prosecutor in a landmark 1989 Supreme Court decision, Webster vs. Reproductive Services, that bolstered states' authority to regulate abortions. But the conservative Republican's gubernatorial campaign has foundered this fall--and abortion has had little to do with it. . . . Democratic Lt. Gov.
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NEWS
January 21, 1990 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here in the heart of what bicoastal snobs call fly-over country, folks are helping to decide how the nation will live and die. Last year, the office of William L. Webster, Missouri's 36-year-old attorney general, brought three cases before the U. S. Supreme Court that directly touch on the issues of when life begins and when and how it might end.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here in the heart of what bicoastal snobs call fly-over country, folks are helping to decide how the nation will live and die. Last year, the office of William L. Webster, Missouri's 36-year-old attorney general, brought three cases before the U. S. Supreme Court that directly touch on the issues of when life begins and when and how it might end.
NEWS
February 19, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
William L. Webster, the former Missouri attorney general whose once-golden political career was destroyed by scandal, began a two-year sentence in federal prison. Webster reported to a prison camp in Florence, Colo., after being convicted of conspiring to use state resources for his political campaigns. Webster, the 1992 Republican nominee for Missouri governor, accused federal prosecutors of a witch hunt to discredit him.
NEWS
November 11, 1988 | Associated Press
The federal government told the Supreme Court on Thursday that a pending Missouri case gives it an "appropriate opportunity" to reconsider the high court's landmark 1973 ruling that legalized abortion. In what appears to be the Reagan Administration's last chance in the Supreme Court to address the 15-year-old Roe vs. Wade ruling, Solicitor General Charles Fried filed a brief noting that the Missouri case "is free of procedural defects."
NEWS
January 9, 1989 | Associated Press
The Supreme Court, acting in an appeal urging reversal of its landmark 1973 decision that legalized abortion nationwide, today agreed to review a Missouri law regulating abortions. The justices said they will study a federal appeals court ruling that struck down key provisions of the state law. Even before today's action in the appeal filed by Missouri officials, the case had become the most-watched battleground in the continuing political war over abortion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1988 | KENNETH J. GARCIA
The state attorney general's office is conducting a fraud investigation of two cancer charities that are part of a national direct-mail campaign offering sweepstakes awards to potential donors. James Cordi, deputy attorney general, said Tuesday that the nonprofit firms are being investigated for possible violations of laws governing false advertising. The inquiry was launched three weeks ago after his office received several complaints.
NEWS
March 27, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
The Justice Department is facing an internal protest over the Bush Administration's aggressive effort to persuade the Supreme Court to reverse its rulings legalizing abortion, according to department sources. Several dozen attorneys have signed petitions circulating within the department in the last week criticizing the Administration's attempt to turn a relatively narrow abortion appeal from Missouri into an all-out attack on the high court's 1973 Roe vs. Wade ruling.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1987 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Everest & Jennings President Whitney McFarlin went to lunch one day last year in a motorized wheelchair made by the company he runs. Eager to experience what it's like to use one, McFarlin was joined by two of his executives on a trip from their offices on Sepulveda Boulevard in West Los Angeles to a delicatessen seven blocks away.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1987 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Everest & Jennings President Whitney McFarlin went to lunch one day last year in a motorized wheelchair made by the company he runs. Eager to experience what it's like to use one, McFarlin was joined by two of his executives on a trip from their offices on Sepulveda Boulevard in West Los Angeles to a delicatessen seven blocks away.
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