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BUSINESS
August 16, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Anaheim stockbroker and a Torrance printing plant worker, who were convicted in May on civil charges relating to an insider trading scheme using advance information from Business Week magazine, were ordered Wednesday to repay $28,655 in illegal profits and fined $37,445. Brian J.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday filed civil insider trading charges against a former Orange County stockbroker and an ex-employee of a Torrance printing plant in the wake of the 1988 Business Week magazine insider trading scandal. In the fifth insider trading lawsuit to result from the scandal, the SEC sued Brian J. Callahan, formerly a broker in the Anaheim office of Prudential-Bache Securities, and William N.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first two men to stand trial in the nationwide Business Week insider trading scandal took the stand Monday in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, both claiming they were unaware that what they had done was illegal. The Securities and Exchange Commission has charged in a civil insider-trading lawsuit that Brian J. Callahan, a former broker in the Anaheim office of Prudential-Bache Securities, and William N.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
A government attorney told a federal jury in Los Angeles Wednesday that a former Orange County stockbroker and a Torrance printer knew that they were breaking insider trading laws when they used advance information from Business Week to make profits in stock trades. Defense lawyers argued that Brian J. Callahan, a former stockbroker for Prudential-Bache Securities Inc. in Anaheim, and William N. Jackson, a one-time printer for R. R.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Anaheim stockbroker and a Torrance printing plant worker, who were convicted in May on civil charges relating to an insider trading scheme using advance information from Business Week magazine, were ordered Wednesday to repay $28,655 in illegal profits and fined $37,445. Brian J.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first two men to stand trial in the nationwide Business Week insider trading scandal took the stand Monday in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, each claiming that he was completely unaware that what he had done was illegal. The Securities and Exchange Commission has charged in a civil insider trading lawsuit that Brian J. Callahan, a former broker in the Anaheim office of Prudential-Bache Securities, and William N.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury in Los Angeles on Wednesday took just over an hour to decide that an Anaheim stockbroker and a Torrance printer engaged in securities fraud when they traded stocks based on information culled from advance copies of Business Week magazine. In the civil trial--the first stemming from a series of nationwide insider trading cases involving the magazine's "Inside Wall Street" column--the eight-person jury found that stockbroker Brian J. Callahan conspired with printer William N.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury in Los Angeles on Wednesday took just over an hour to decide that an Anaheim stockbroker and a Torrance printer engaged in securities fraud when they traded stocks based on information culled from advance copies of Business Week magazine. In the civil trial--the first stemming from a series of nationwide insider trading cases involving the magazine's "Inside Wall Street" column--the eight-person jury found that stockbroker Brian J. Callahan conspired with printer William N.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first two men to stand trial in the nationwide Business Week insider trading scandal took the stand Monday in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, each claiming that he was completely unaware that what he had done was illegal. The Securities and Exchange Commission has charged in a civil insider trading lawsuit that Brian J. Callahan, a former broker in the Anaheim office of Prudential-Bache Securities, and William N.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first two men to stand trial in the nationwide Business Week insider trading scandal took the stand Monday in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, both claiming they were unaware that what they had done was illegal. The Securities and Exchange Commission has charged in a civil insider-trading lawsuit that Brian J. Callahan, a former broker in the Anaheim office of Prudential-Bache Securities, and William N.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
A government attorney told a federal jury in Los Angeles Wednesday that a former Orange County stockbroker and a Torrance printer knew that they were breaking insider trading laws when they used advance information from Business Week to make profits in stock trades. Defense lawyers argued that Brian J. Callahan, a former stockbroker for Prudential-Bache Securities Inc. in Anaheim, and William N. Jackson, a one-time printer for R. R.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday filed civil insider trading charges against a former Orange County stockbroker and an ex-employee of a Torrance printing plant in the wake of the 1988 Business Week magazine insider trading scandal. In the fifth insider trading lawsuit to result from the scandal, the SEC sued Brian J. Callahan, formerly a broker in the Anaheim office of Prudential-Bache Securities, and William N.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday filed civil insider trading charges against a former Orange County stockbroker and an ex-employee of a Torrance printing plant in the wake of the 1988 Business Week magazine insider trading scandal. In the fifth insider trading lawsuit to result from the scandal, the SEC sued Brian J. Callahan, formerly a broker in the Anaheim office of Prudential-Bache Securities, and William N.
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