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William Peter Blatty

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A noted author's generosity will cover the bulk of the funeral expenses for San Fernando High School football player Sergio Echevarria, who died last week of heatstroke after practicing in 102-degree weather. William Peter Blatty of Hidden Hills, who wrote "The Exorcist," gave $3,000 to help pay for the youth's burial in Mexico. Other efforts, including collections taken by the school football team and school officials, raised an added $485.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Susan King
Warner Bros. Home Entertainment is celebrating the 40th anniversary of William Friedkin's horror film "The Exorcist" with a Blu-ray release featuring the theatrical version and an extended director's cut. The new release of the blockbuster, which won Oscars for William Peter Blatty's screenplay (based on his novel) and for sound, arrives Oct. 8 in anticipation of Halloween. "After my initial cut, I took out 12 minutes before I released it in theaters,"  Friedkin said in a statement released Thursday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2000 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's never been a phenomenon quite like "The Exorcist." Its disturbing powerand graphic horror are unrivaled. Unlike "The Blair Witch Project," its cultural hysteria was about something very tangible--and not just a clever marketing campaign. The 1971 best-selling novel by William Peter Blatty and 1973 blockbuster movie directed by William Friedkin tapped into the era's social chaos and spiritual longing. "The Exorcist" dared to prove the existence of God by giving the devil his due.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2012 | By Gina McIntyre, Los Angeles Times
Few films conjure up the nightmarish movie memories that"The Exorcist"does. William Friedkin's 1973 adaptation of William Peter Blatty's bestselling novel famously spurred reports of screaming, fainting and even moviegoers running from theaters as 12-year-old Regan MacNeil, possessed by an ancient, powerful evil, spat out obscenities and ugly rivers of dark green bile. Religious leaders condemned the movie as sacrilegious; some cautioned that watching the film and its head-spinning imagery would endanger the soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2012 | By Gina McIntyre, Los Angeles Times
Few films conjure up the nightmarish movie memories that"The Exorcist"does. William Friedkin's 1973 adaptation of William Peter Blatty's bestselling novel famously spurred reports of screaming, fainting and even moviegoers running from theaters as 12-year-old Regan MacNeil, possessed by an ancient, powerful evil, spat out obscenities and ugly rivers of dark green bile. Religious leaders condemned the movie as sacrilegious; some cautioned that watching the film and its head-spinning imagery would endanger the soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Susan King
Warner Bros. Home Entertainment is celebrating the 40th anniversary of William Friedkin's horror film "The Exorcist" with a Blu-ray release featuring the theatrical version and an extended director's cut. The new release of the blockbuster, which won Oscars for William Peter Blatty's screenplay (based on his novel) and for sound, arrives Oct. 8 in anticipation of Halloween. "After my initial cut, I took out 12 minutes before I released it in theaters,"  Friedkin said in a statement released Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1989 | Leonard Klady
Author-writer-director William Peter Blatty, currently completing Morgan Creek's "Exorcist: 1990," insists that his sequel will be "the last serious word on the subject." Meanwhile, his next project, "Demons 5, Exorcists 0," will send up the subject that made him a household name. "The script's completed, and Fox (which released '1990') has first refusal," said Blatty. "It's about a convention of priests beset by an evil presence."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2010 | By Nick Owchar
In the annals of demonology, William Peter Blatty falls somewhere between St. Augustine and Joss Whedon. He isn't the first person who's ever written about demons and demonic possession, but he has provided us with one of the genre's most memorable novels, 1971's "The Exorcist." There had been disturbing stories before, but nothing -- especially when Blatty teamed up with director William Friedkin for the 1973 screen adaptation -- so terrified audiences about the possibilities of the diabolical in ordinary people's lives.
NEWS
December 18, 1985
Author William Peter Blatty's $6-million civil suit claiming that the New York Times wrongly omitted his book "Legion" from its influential best-seller list has been reinstated by an appellate court. Blatty's attorney, Richard Coleman, noting that the newspaper "has life-and-death power over authors," said the unanimous decision by the 2nd District Court of Appeal, announced in Los Angeles, means the case can move forward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1992
Southern Californians have contributed $3,485 to pay funeral expenses for San Fernando High School football player Sergio Echevarria, who died last week of heatstroke after practicing in 102-degree temperatures. The family needed $3,000 to ship Sergio's body home to Michoacan, Mexico, for the funeral. Donations ranged from $5 to $3,000, the latter from "The Exorcist" author William Peter Blatty of Hidden Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2010 | By Nick Owchar
In the annals of demonology, William Peter Blatty falls somewhere between St. Augustine and Joss Whedon. He isn't the first person who's ever written about demons and demonic possession, but he has provided us with one of the genre's most memorable novels, 1971's "The Exorcist." There had been disturbing stories before, but nothing -- especially when Blatty teamed up with director William Friedkin for the 1973 screen adaptation -- so terrified audiences about the possibilities of the diabolical in ordinary people's lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2000 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's never been a phenomenon quite like "The Exorcist." Its disturbing powerand graphic horror are unrivaled. Unlike "The Blair Witch Project," its cultural hysteria was about something very tangible--and not just a clever marketing campaign. The 1971 best-selling novel by William Peter Blatty and 1973 blockbuster movie directed by William Friedkin tapped into the era's social chaos and spiritual longing. "The Exorcist" dared to prove the existence of God by giving the devil his due.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A noted author's generosity will cover the bulk of the funeral expenses for San Fernando High School football player Sergio Echevarria, who died last week of heatstroke after practicing in 102-degree weather. William Peter Blatty of Hidden Hills, who wrote "The Exorcist," gave $3,000 to help pay for the youth's burial in Mexico. Other efforts, including collections taken by the school football team and school officials, raised an added $485.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1989 | Leonard Klady
Author-writer-director William Peter Blatty, currently completing Morgan Creek's "Exorcist: 1990," insists that his sequel will be "the last serious word on the subject." Meanwhile, his next project, "Demons 5, Exorcists 0," will send up the subject that made him a household name. "The script's completed, and Fox (which released '1990') has first refusal," said Blatty. "It's about a convention of priests beset by an evil presence."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1993
In response to Jack Mathews' Film Comment "Nothing Left but Smoke" (Feb. 14): Will the laudation of directors never cease? I myself hugely admire many of them, but it seems that according to Mathews, "through the '70s, film's brightest political minds"--Ashby, Lumet, Penn, Altman, Coppola, Russell, Cassavetes--belonged solely to directors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997 | DAVID GREENBERG
Sue Grafton, whose 13 mystery novels have sold more than 18 million copies in the United States, will make an appearance Sunday to benefit KCLU 88.3 FM. From 10 a.m. to noon, Grafton will be at Borders Books and Music, 125 W. Thousand Oaks Blvd. in Thousand Oaks, where she will be interviewed for KCLU's "Beyond Words" program.
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