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William Randall

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March 24, 1998 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Twin brothers, self-described as the "two of the best examples of Scouts on the face of the Earth," responded tearfully Monday to the California Supreme Court ruling that the Boy Scouts could expel them because they refused to affirm the existence of God in the organization's oath. Michael and William Randall, 16, said they were proud of their actions and only wished the Scouts had shown as much "integrity and character" as the twins have.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
William B. Randall, 80, manufacturer of suntan lotion and other personal care products sold through upscale hotels and spas, died Nov. 2 of cancer at his Carlsbad, Calif., home. Born in Philadelphia, Randall attended Rider College in Trenton, N.J., and served as an Army Air Forces navigator during World War II before beginning his career in sales. In 1961, he became president of Sea & Ski Corp.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1998 | VALERIE BURGHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pair of Orange County twins who say they have spent the good part of their young lives fulfilling the Boy Scout credo, except duty to God, were described by their father as "120 miles high" Monday after nearing their dream of becoming Eagle Scouts. The legal battle over Michael and William Randall's future in the Scouts has raged for seven years because of their refusal to adhere to the organization's commitment to God.
NEWS
March 24, 1998 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Twin brothers, self-described as the "two of the best examples of Scouts on the face of the Earth," responded tearfully Monday to the California Supreme Court ruling that the Boy Scouts could expel them because they refused to affirm the existence of God in the organization's oath. Michael and William Randall, 16, said they were proud of their actions and only wished the Scouts had shown as much "integrity and character" as the twins have.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1998 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local Scouting officials on Sunday recommended that a set of Anaheim Hills twins who have refused to recite the religious portion of the Scout's oath be awarded the group's highest rank. The six-member panel, which included three members from the Orange County Council of the Boy Scouts of America, voted unanimously to grant Eagle Scout badges to 16-year-old Michael and William Randall. The local chapter was ordered last month by Orange County Superior Court Judge Richard O. Frazee Sr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1992 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their old Cub Scout uniforms were getting too tight and were showing their age, so 10-year-old twins Michael and William Randall went and bought themselves brand spanking new ones. And when a judge ruled Monday that the brothers, forced out of the Cub Scouts because they do not believe in God, can now rejoin the organization, the boys pranced around, proudly displaying their new outfits. "Now, it's real!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1991 | MATT LAIT
A former Tustin Cub Scout leader who was expelled from the organization because he is an atheist testified Wednesday that he does not think his views on God are contrary to Scouting's religious requirements. David Wise, 40, said the Boy Scouts' own bylaws state that members "are not required to belong to any organized religion."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1993 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An appellate court justice on Tuesday denounced as "silliness" a legal dispute involving Anaheim Hills twins who refuse to take an oath to God as required by the Orange County Boy Scouts. Attorneys on both sides of the controversy surrounding Scouts William and Michael Randall, now 12, say the case involves constitutional issues of freedom of speech, association and religion that are at the heart of Scouting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1995 | ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conservative Orange County politicians have filed a brief with the state's highest court, saying government has no business getting involved in a local Boy Scout Council's battle to exclude twins who refused to acknowledge a belief in God.
NEWS
May 8, 1992 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a year and a half, 10-year-old twins Michael and William Randall have been in the spotlight wherever they went. In the courtroom where the twins are battling the Boy Scouts of America, and down the court corridor, reporters and photographers mobbed them with endless questions. On the street, strangers did double-takes when they recognized the well-publicized cherubic faces, and encouraged them to continue the fight. And in the schoolyard, a crush of classmates taunted them for their atheism.
NEWS
March 24, 1998 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The Boy Scouts of America is a "social organization," not a business, and enjoys broad authority to ban agnostics and gays, the California Supreme Court ruled in two cases Monday. The long-anticipated decisions put an end to nearly two decades of court battles in California over whether the state's civil rights law restricts the Scouts' ability to bar certain groups.
NEWS
March 24, 1998 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The Boy Scouts of America is a "social organization," not a business, and enjoys broad authority to ban agnostics and gays, the California Supreme Court ruled Monday in cases brought by twins from Anaheim Hills and a former Eagle Scout from Berkeley. The long-anticipated decisions put an end to nearly two decades of court battles in California over whether the state's civil rights law restricts the Scouts' ability to bar certain groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1998 | VALERIE BURGHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pair of Orange County twins who say they have spent the good part of their young lives fulfilling the Boy Scout credo, except duty to God, were described by their father as "120 miles high" Monday after nearing their dream of becoming Eagle Scouts. The legal battle over Michael and William Randall's future in the Scouts has raged for seven years because of their refusal to adhere to the organization's commitment to God.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1998 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local Scouting officials on Sunday recommended that a set of Anaheim Hills twins who have refused to recite the religious portion of the Scout's oath be awarded the group's highest rank. The six-member panel, which included three members from the Orange County Council of the Boy Scouts of America, voted unanimously to grant Eagle Scout badges to 16-year-old Michael and William Randall. The local chapter was ordered last month by Orange County Superior Court Judge Richard O. Frazee Sr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1995 | ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conservative Orange County politicians have filed a brief with the state's highest court, saying government has no business getting involved in a local Boy Scout Council's battle to exclude twins who refused to acknowledge a belief in God.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1993 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An appellate court justice on Tuesday denounced as "silliness" a legal dispute involving Anaheim Hills twins who refuse to take an oath to God as required by the Orange County Boy Scouts. Attorneys on both sides of the controversy surrounding Scouts William and Michael Randall, now 12, say the case involves constitutional issues of freedom of speech, association and religion that are at the heart of Scouting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several Cub Scouts who belong to the same den that allegedly excluded twin Anaheim Hills brothers for refusing to say an oath to God testified Thursday that religion was not discussed when they joined. Only one of the five boys called to testify remembered being asked if he believed in God when he signed up for Scouting. All five said they never prayed during any Scout meeting.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twin Anaheim Hills boys who allege that the Boy Scouts of America ousted them because of their refusal to swear an oath to God testified Wednesday that they were members of the organization for nearly three years before their position on religion caused a problem. "I never said the word 'God' in the Cub Scout Promise," said 10-year-old William Randall. "I just mouthed it. . . . Me and my brother don't believe in God."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1992 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Boy Scouts of America lost a bid Thursday to keep two Anaheim Hill boys out of the organization because they do not believe in God, attorneys said. The state Supreme Court on Thursday refused to hear a petition by the Orange County Council of the Boy Scouts of America. That development, in effect, allows twins William and Michael Randall to participate in Scouting while the Boy Scouts pursue an appeal of Orange County Superior Court Judge Richard O. Frazee Sr.'s May ruling.
NEWS
June 30, 1992 | Associated Press
Twin 10-year-old boys ousted from the Cub Scouts for refusing to say God in the Scout oath can return to their pack, a judge reaffirmed Monday. Superior Court Judge Richard Frazee ruled that local Boy Scout officials cannot bar William and Michael Randall from the organization because it is a business under state law and therefore cannot exclude people because of their religious beliefs. Frazee had ruled in favor of the youngsters on May 7, so Monday's formal order was not a surprise.
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