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William Randolph Hearst

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NEWS
November 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Los Angeles Herald Examiner, once the nation's largest afternoon newspaper but recently just a scrappy shell of its former self, announced today it will cease publication Thursday. Robert Danzig, vice president and general manager of Herald Newspapers, made the announcement at an emotional meeting in the newsroom this afternoon. The Herald Examiner, founded by William Randolph Hearst in 1903 as the Los Angeles Examiner, was put up for sale by the Hearst Corp. earlier this summer.
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NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Back in the day, actress Marion Davies' luxurious beach house in Santa Monica had more than 100 rooms and an ornate swimming pool. Little of the original mansion still exists, but what's now known as the Annenberg Community Beach House still has plenty of oceanfront allure. The beach house will mark its fifth anniversary Saturday and Sunday with an open house that is to feature activities as varied as ballroom dancing and paddleboarding lessons. Guided tours with architects John Berley and Mia Lehrer are scheduled for 10 a.m. each day. The mansion was financed by Davies' lover, newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst, and many grand Hollywood parties were held here, according to a history on the beach house website . Hearst engaged Julia Morgan to design it; Morgan also designed Hearst Castle in San Simeon, Calif.
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TRAVEL
May 27, 1990 | KENNETH TURAN, Turan is a Los Angeles-based free-lancer who writes frequently about the movies. and
"Xanadu! Its cost: No man can say. " --Citizen Kane Cary Grant, a guest more than two dozen times, called it "a great place to spend the Depression." Hedda Hopper, in a rare moment of near-poetry, said it was "a visit to Never-Never land. Never have we seen its like, and never will we again." It's formal name was La Cuesta Encantada, the Enchanted Hill, but to its owner and absolute ruler it was simply "the ranch."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Musically speaking, one of the best parts of the breakout success of “True Detective” is the window it opens into the world of the Handsome Family. The husband-wife duo of Brett and Rennie Sparks composed “Far From Any Road,” used each week in the HBO mystery's opening credits, but that tells only a tiny part of their story. For the last two decades the pair has been using the blueprints of old-time country and western balladry to create dark but often lovely narratives set in the present.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
"A COLLECTION of everything. So big it can never be cataloged or appraised. Enough for 10 museums. The loot of the world." That's the description of the art collection in "Citizen Kane," Orson Welles' masterpiece inspired by William Randolph Hearst. And the 1941 film has left an indelible impression of a voracious accumulator who focused on quantity, not quality. Art history has been no kinder to Hearst, whose mining inheritance financed a media empire and an enormous art collection that filled six palatial dwellings -- including Hearst Castle, the 250,000-acre, 165-room estate that overlooks San Simeon on the Pacific Coast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Phoebe Hearst Cooke, who was a granddaughter of publishing tycoon William Randolph Hearst and used one of the nation's biggest fortunes to support a variety of philanthropic causes, has died. She was 85. Cooke, who had pneumonia, died Sunday in a Templeton, Calif., hospital, according to a statement from the Hearst Corp., the media company she served as a director for 36 years. Her twin brother, George Randolph Hearst Jr., who was a former publisher of the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, died in June after a stroke.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Randolph Apperson Hearst, the last surviving son of the legendary newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst and chairman of the family's media empire from 1973 to 1996, died Monday in a New York hospital. He was 85. Hearst also was editor and president of the San Francisco Examiner when his daughter Patricia was kidnapped by the radical Symbionese Liberation Army in 1974. During the long ordeal, a visibly shaken Hearst regularly faced television cameras and pleaded for his daughter's return.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
When the film "Citizen Kane" came out in 1941, William Randolph Hearst gave it an unequivocal two thumbs down. The press lord kept ads for the film out of his many newspapers. Just before its release, one of his allies in Hollywood tried to buy the footage in order to burn it. Another approached FBI chief J. Edgar Hoover, who launched a decade-long investigation of Orson Welles, the film's 26-year-old director, producer, co-writer and star. But rosebuds bloom in unlikely places.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Musically speaking, one of the best parts of the breakout success of “True Detective” is the window it opens into the world of the Handsome Family. The husband-wife duo of Brett and Rennie Sparks composed “Far From Any Road,” used each week in the HBO mystery's opening credits, but that tells only a tiny part of their story. For the last two decades the pair has been using the blueprints of old-time country and western balladry to create dark but often lovely narratives set in the present.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2010 | By Anthony Mostrom, Special to The Los Angeles Times
One hundred-plus years after the newspaper comic strip was born in San Francisco, a reader might well ask: Who was the greatest comic artist of all time? Some scholars say the question was settled in 1924 by New York arts critic Gilbert Seldes, whose book on the American cultural scene, "The 7 Lively Arts," devoted an entire chapter to a reclusive cartoonist in the Hollywood Hills named George Herriman and his avant-garde comic strip, "Krazy Kat. " Although President Woodrow Wilson, a notorious egghead, and writers T.S. Eliot and Gertrude Stein were fans and newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst was an ardent supporter, Herriman's dialect-heavy but poetic strip was a problem for many newspaper editors and most readers — where were the jokes?
OPINION
January 28, 2014 | Jonah Goldberg
The legendary media tycoon William Randolph Hearst believed America needed a strongman and that Franklin D. Roosevelt would fit the bill. He ordered his newspapers to support FDR and the New Deal. At his direction, Hearst's political allies rallied around Roosevelt at the Democratic convention, which some believe sealed the deal for Roosevelt's nomination. But all that wasn't enough. Hearst also believed the voters had to be made to see what could be gained from a president with a free hand.
TRAVEL
December 21, 2013 | Los Angeles Times
If you ever wanted to spend the night at a Hearst property designed by Julia Morgan, here is your chance. Book a Tower Room at the Historical Hacienda, William Randolph Hearst's Rancho Milpitas - and you would swear Errol Flynn is staying next door. The added bonus is Mission San Antonio, a mile down the road. Have your ID, insurance and car registration handy because the hacienda is on Ft. Hunter Liggett property. Have a pizza at the bowling alley or enjoy a drink at historic Club Hacienda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2013 | Steve Lopez
The last edition of the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner was published on Nov. 2, 1989, with the headline: "So long, Los Angeles. " But 23 years later, one employee has not yet said goodbye. Chuck Lutz hasn't even left the building. "They never told me not to come back to work, so I just kept coming back to work," said Lutz, who was exaggerating a little. When a colleague declined an offer to supervise the shutdown of the newspaper plant, Lutz - who joined the Her-Ex in 1973 as a truck driver - gladly stepped into the job. One task led to another, and the Hearst Corp., which published the newspaper and still owns the building, kept the reliable Lutz around to keep an eye on things and open the door for film crews that use the property.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Phoebe Hearst Cooke, who was a granddaughter of publishing tycoon William Randolph Hearst and used one of the nation's biggest fortunes to support a variety of philanthropic causes, has died. She was 85. Cooke, who had pneumonia, died Sunday in a Templeton, Calif., hospital, according to a statement from the Hearst Corp., the media company she served as a director for 36 years. Her twin brother, George Randolph Hearst Jr., who was a former publisher of the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, died in June after a stroke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
The demise of the Hearst newspaper empire in Los Angeles began in 1962 when publisher George Randolph Hearst Jr. abandoned the morning newspaper market. Hearst and the company that owned the Los Angeles Times made what some viewed as a back-room deal: At almost the same time, they folded editions that directly competed with each other. A sister paper of The Times, the afternoon daily Mirror, stopped publishing while the Hearst Corp. "merged" the morning Examiner with the afternoon Herald-Express.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times
You can draw a straight line, in terms of architectural history, from William Randolph Hearst'ssprawling estate in San Simeon to the corner of Broadway and 11th Street in downtown Los Angeles. It was at that downtown site in 1913 that Hearst commissioned architect Julia Morgan to design a headquarters for his Los Angeles Examiner newspaper, which he'd founded in 1903. Morgan produced one of the most remarkable designs of her prolific career, a 103,500-square-foot Mission Revival building draped with Italian and Moorish touches, including domes covered in yellow and blue tile.
NEWS
October 12, 1989
Leo Albert Pollock, 99, a veteran Hearst newsman who helped Fox movie studios create newsreels shown in movie theaters. Born in Harlem in 1890, Pollock worked on Hearst dailies in New York, covering major stories such as the trial of Bruno Richard Hauptmann for the kidnaping and murder of aviator Charles Lindbergh's infant son. Pollock later moved to California, where he worked with Fox and served as publicist for actress Marion Davies, companion of newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1985
Michael Wilmington ("Orson Welles: Giant of Cinema, Maker of Myths," Oct. 20) missed one of the most important reasons why Orson Welles had a lack of opportunity to do the films he wanted and had so little success in getting financial backing. In "Citizen Kane" he tread on the toes of newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst, who took Welles characterization of Kane personally. After "Citizen Kane" no Hearst papers ever carried mention of Welles, and that included the columns of Luella Parsons, the most influential of the gossipers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
When the film "Citizen Kane" came out in 1941, William Randolph Hearst gave it an unequivocal two thumbs down. The press lord kept ads for the film out of his many newspapers. Just before its release, one of his allies in Hollywood tried to buy the footage in order to burn it. Another approached FBI chief J. Edgar Hoover, who launched a decade-long investigation of Orson Welles, the film's 26-year-old director, producer, co-writer and star. But rosebuds bloom in unlikely places.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2011
John Randolph Hearst Jr. Grandson and heir of William Randolph Hearst John Randolph Hearst Jr., 77, a grandson of media titan William Randolph Hearst and heir to the family fortune, died Friday in New York, Hearst Corp. said in a statement. The cause was not disclosed. Nicknamed "Bunky," Hearst spent most of his career at the company his grandfather founded. Besides serving on the board, he was a trustee of the Hearst Family Trust and a director of the Hearst Foundations.
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