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William Rehnquist

NATIONAL
January 1, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist used his year-end report on federal courts to plead for help for what he says are overworked and underpaid judges. In a softer tone than in 2001, Rehnquist said he hoped Congress would recognize that top federal judges are fleeing to better-paying private jobs.
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NEWS
October 6, 1986 | Associated Press
The House voted today to name the federal building and U.S. courthouse in St. Paul, Minn., after former Chief Justice Warren E. Burger, a native of that city. Burger recently retired from the Supreme Court and was succeeded by Associate Justice William H. Rehnquist.
NEWS
August 7, 1987 | Associated Press
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and six other members of the U.S. Supreme Court will visit Canada for eight days starting Aug. 30 to exchange views with judges, lawyers and academics, the Canadian Judicial Council announced.
NEWS
September 23, 1986 | Associated Press
William H. Rehnquist will be sworn in as chief justice and Antonin Scalia will become an associate justice of the Supreme Court in a ceremony Friday, the court announced Monday. Chief Justice Warren E. Burger, who is retiring, will administer the oath of office to Rehnquist, who will then swear in Scalia.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist was sent home after spending a week in the hospital for treatment of thyroid cancer. A Supreme Court spokesman announced the 80-year-old Rehnquist's release from the National Naval Medical Center in suburban Bethesda, Md.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Justice Antonin Scalia earned his reputation as the Supreme Court's most outspoken conservative with sharp one-liners in his opinions and sarcastic cracks in the courtroom. When a government lawyer defending campaign funding laws raised the specter this week of million-dollar checks flowing to congressional campaigns, Scalia was unmoved. “I don't think $3.5 million is a heck of a lot of money,” he said, since billions are spent on national campaigns. This week, he also sounded off on the pope, the devil and the Gipper as well homosexuals, as he referred to them, and the “shrilly liberal” news media.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By David G. Savage and David Lauter
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court struck another major blow against long-standing restrictions on campaign money Wednesday, freeing wealthy donors to each give a total of $3.6 million this year to the slate of candidates running for Congress. Rejecting the restriction as a violation of free speech, the 5-4 ruling struck down a Watergate-era limit that Congress wrote to prevent a single donor from writing a large check to buy influence on Capitol Hill. It was the latest sign that the court's conservative majority intends to continue dismantling funding limits created over the last four decades.
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