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William Reynolds

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NEWS
July 19, 1997 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Reynolds, a film editor whose seamless assemblage of "The Sound of Music" and "The Sting" won him two Academy Awards, died in South Pasadena. He was 87. Reynolds' nearly 60-year career spanned the modern history of movie-making. He edited and co-edited 80 films ranging from science fiction classics ("The Day the Earth Stood Still") to musicals ("Carousel," "Hello Dolly" and "South Pacific"), dramas ("The Turning Point") and epics ("The Godfather").
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NEWS
July 19, 1997 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Reynolds, a film editor whose seamless assemblage of "The Sound of Music" and "The Sting" won him two Academy Awards, died in South Pasadena. He was 87. Reynolds' nearly 60-year career spanned the modern history of movie-making. He edited and co-edited 80 films ranging from science fiction classics ("The Day the Earth Stood Still") to musicals ("Carousel," "Hello Dolly" and "South Pacific"), dramas ("The Turning Point") and epics ("The Godfather").
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NEWS
March 6, 1995
William H. Reynolds, 69, professor of music emeritus at UC Riverside, a founding professor at that campus when it opened in 1954 and the conductor-baritone who organized the UCR Choral Society and Madrigal Singers. After receiving a master's degree at Princeton University in 1951 he taught music at Vassar and also directed the chorus there. In 1954 he was invited to organize the music department at Riverside which he served as chairman for many years.
NEWS
March 6, 1995
William H. Reynolds, 69, professor of music emeritus at UC Riverside, a founding professor at that campus when it opened in 1954 and the conductor-baritone who organized the UCR Choral Society and Madrigal Singers. After receiving a master's degree at Princeton University in 1951 he taught music at Vassar and also directed the chorus there. In 1954 he was invited to organize the music department at Riverside which he served as chairman for many years.
BOOKS
August 10, 1986 | Art Seidenbaum, Seidenbaum is The Times' Opinion editor.
Take away the palm trees. Move Raymond Chandler-like family villainy to Nebraska and set amid snowstorms. Add incest and child abuse to be contemporary. Give the private eye--himself named, of all places, Nebraska--a second career as a would-be novelist. Have him, for tradition's sake, in the process of losing his wife. Use the four-letter language of Omaha and everywhere. Stir in humor.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1986
Jack L. Heckel was elected president and chief operating officer of GenCorp, the Akron, Ohio, aerospace, automotive and entertainment industries conglomerate. Heckel was chairman and chief executive of Aerojet General, GenCorp's La Jolla aerospace subsidiary. Heckel takes over as GenCorp president from company Chairman and Chief Executive A. William Reynolds, who will retain his other two titles. Aerojet President George W. Leisz will assume Heckel's Aerojet positions.
NEWS
December 5, 1985
The Pasadena Board of City Directors has agreed to help Pasadena-based developer Cantwell-Anderson arrange financing for 261 rental housing units by lending its tax-exempt status to a $21.3-million rental housing revenue bond issue. The bonds will be used to help finance construction of a 139-unit project at 416 S. Marengo Ave., a 98-unit project at 44-100 Mar Vista Ave. and a 24-unit project at 222 S. Holliston Ave.
NEWS
December 5, 1985
The Community Development Commission has approved $15.9 million in certifi-cates of participation for construction of an 850-space parking facility beneath the proposed Plaza Las Fuentes luxury hotel project. The project, which will be anchored by a 350-room hotel and include offices and shops, is proposed for the corner of Los Robles Avenue and Walnut Street, a commission-owned site.
BOOKS
August 10, 1986 | Art Seidenbaum, Seidenbaum is The Times' Opinion editor.
Take away the palm trees. Move Raymond Chandler-like family villainy to Nebraska and set amid snowstorms. Add incest and child abuse to be contemporary. Give the private eye--himself named, of all places, Nebraska--a second career as a would-be novelist. Have him, for tradition's sake, in the process of losing his wife. Use the four-letter language of Omaha and everywhere. Stir in humor.
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