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William S Burroughs

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NEWS
August 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
Until the end, William S. Burroughs shuddered at the thought of a world without drugs and railed against the politicians trying to ban them. The latest issue of the New Yorker contains excerpts from journals kept by the Beat Generation author and former heroin addict in which he criticizes Newt Gingrich and other politicians he blamed for trying to make American life "banal."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Monday night at the Central Library author Barry Miles and I discussed the life and work of William S. Burroughs , whose 100th birthday is on Wednesday. Burroughs, of course, was one of the great iconoclasts of 20th century literature: progenitor of the Beat generation, titular godfather of punk. That he tended to eschew such labels (“You must learn to exist with no religion no country no allies,” he declared in his 1969 book “The Job.” “You must learn to live alone in silence”)
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NEWS
August 3, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William S. Burroughs, whose ragged, scatological, experimental prose made him a seminal figure of the Beat Generation and later a guru to the hippie and punk rock movements, died Saturday at age 83. Burroughs died in Lawrence, Kan., about 24 hours after suffering a heart attack, said his longtime publicist, Ira Silverberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Barney Rosset, who died Tuesday at the age of 89, was the most important American publisher of the 20th century. Sure, he was part of a lineage; it's difficult to imagine Rosset doing what he did for more than 30 years at Grove Press without the example of James Laughlin at the seminal independent New Directions or (further afield) Jack Kahane at Paris' Obelisk Press. And yet Grove, which Rosset bought in 1951 for $3,000 and ran until 1985, remains the touchstone, the publisher most responsible for breaking down American literary puritanism, for defending the idea that art, that literature, is meant to unsettle us, that among its central purposes is to challenge the status quo. Look at the writers Rosset published: Henry Miller, Samuel Beckett, William S. Burroughs, Eugene Ionesco, Jean Genet, Malcolm X. Look at the books that he brought into the center of the culture: "Tropic of Cancer," "Waiting for Godot," "Naked Lunch," "Our Lady of the Flowers," "A Confederacy of Dunces," "Cain's Book.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2010 | Sheri Linden
As the admiring new documentary "A Man Within" shows, the writer William S. Burroughs was a taut collection of contradictions: a critic of law-and-order jingoism who was a gun fanatic (even after killing his wife in a game of William Tell gone terribly wrong), a prescient critic of invasive psychiatry who tried every pharmaceutical known to humanity. A key figure in the Beat movement, he stood apart from his literary peers by virtue of his blue-blood background, his age (he was a generation older than Ginsberg and Kerouac)
BOOKS
April 2, 1989 | ALEX RAKSIN
Discovered in 1984 among Allen Ginsberg's papers at Columbia University, "Interzone" is a collection of essays and notes that essentially constitutes a rough draft of William Burroughs' masterwork, "The Naked Lunch." The surrealistic novel has mystified many readers since it first appeared in 1959, with some praising it as "innovative" and "irreverent" and others denouncing its seemingly random violence as "sadistic" and "amoral."
MAGAZINE
October 18, 1992
Although William S. Burroughs used "Blade Runner" in the title of a 1979 novel, the original use was "The Bladerunner," a 1974 medical thriller by the late Dr. Alan E. Nourse. NORMAN L. COOK Monrovia
BOOKS
December 16, 2007 | David L. Ulin
The last decade has not been kind to William S. Burroughs. Since his death in 1997 at age 83, he has become something of a forgotten figure -- an "hombre invisible," as he half-mockingly used to call himself.
NEWS
October 31, 2002 | Susan Carpenter
Literary renegade William S. Burroughs was a unique character, one whose eventual success was fueled by his early failures. These days, he is revered as a drug-addled philosopher and psychedelic literati, but he may never have been known if it weren't for his inability to find a publisher in the 1940s and his subsequent downward spiral into the underworld.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2010 | Sheri Linden
As the admiring new documentary "A Man Within" shows, the writer William S. Burroughs was a taut collection of contradictions: a critic of law-and-order jingoism who was a gun fanatic (even after killing his wife in a game of William Tell gone terribly wrong), a prescient critic of invasive psychiatry who tried every pharmaceutical known to humanity. A key figure in the Beat movement, he stood apart from his literary peers by virtue of his blue-blood background, his age (he was a generation older than Ginsberg and Kerouac)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Barney Rosset, the renegade founder of Grove Press who fought groundbreaking legal battles against censorship and introduced American readers to such provocative writers as Harold Pinter, Samuel Beckett, Eugene Ionesco and Jean Genet, died Tuesday in New York City. He was 89. His daughter, Tansey Rosset, said he died after undergoing surgery to replace a heart valve. In 1951 Rosset bought tiny Grove Press, named after the Greenwich Village street where it was located, and turned it into one of the most influential publishing companies of its time.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2010
'William S. Burroughs: A Man Within' Rating: No MPAA rating Running time: 1 hour, 28 minutes Playing: At the Downtown Independent, Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2010 | Sheri Linden
As the admiring new documentary "A Man Within" shows, the writer William S. Burroughs was a taut collection of contradictions: a critic of law-and-order jingoism who was a gun fanatic (even after killing his wife in a game of William Tell gone terribly wrong), a prescient critic of invasive psychiatry who tried every pharmaceutical known to humanity. A key figure in the Beat movement, he stood apart from his literary peers by virtue of his blue-blood background, his age (he was a generation older than Ginsberg and Kerouac)
BOOKS
December 16, 2007 | David L. Ulin
The last decade has not been kind to William S. Burroughs. Since his death in 1997 at age 83, he has become something of a forgotten figure -- an "hombre invisible," as he half-mockingly used to call himself.
BOOKS
December 17, 2006 | David Cotner, David Cotner is a contributing writer to LA Weekly.
THE cautionary tale is one of the casualties of the 21st century -- along with telegrams, Playboy magazine and poise. Sex tapes are released, and the only time eyes blink are to swish away tears of scornful laughter. Lawsuits and settlements are the new bootstraps by which one aims to pull oneself up. When all is forgiven, when no one really cares anymore about things like shame and personal ruin -- after all, it didn't happen to you -- what place has such a story in the modern world?
BOOKS
July 6, 2003 | Douglas Brinkley, Douglas Brinkley is director of the Eisenhower Center for American Studies and a professor of history at the University of New Orleans.
Naked Lunch William S. Burroughs Grove Press: 290 pp., $24 * Junky William S. Burroughs Penguin Books: 166 pp., $14 paper * Queer to think of him now spending the last decade of his life living in Lawrence, Kan., meticulously dressed in his undertaker suit and gray fedora, a cross between T.S. Eliot and Dashiell Hammett, poking through the cat food at the local Kroger's, then aiming his Smith & Wesson at backyard canvases in the pursuit of instant "shotgun art," winding up reading H.P.
NEWS
February 10, 1986 | MALCOLM BOYD, Boyd's 21st book, "Half Laughing/Half Crying: Songs for Myself," will be published by St. Martin's Press in January. and
Queer by William S. Burroughs (Viking: $14.95) Unpublished for three decades, this novel tells the story of a seduction in Mexico in the '40s. William Lee, whose "face was ravaged and vicious and old, but the clear, green eyes were dreamy and innocent," falls in love with Eugene Allerton, who dislikes commitments and has never been in love. They reach an accommodation to stay together for a while but limit sexual contact to twice a week.
NEWS
October 31, 2002 | Susan Carpenter
Literary renegade William S. Burroughs was a unique character, one whose eventual success was fueled by his early failures. These days, he is revered as a drug-addled philosopher and psychedelic literati, but he may never have been known if it weren't for his inability to find a publisher in the 1940s and his subsequent downward spiral into the underworld.
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