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William Shakespeare

ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2003 | Kristin Hohenadel, Special to The Times
English men have always loved to put on dresses. But when the British-born, American-raised, London-based actor Mark Rylance dons the Elizabethan black and white-lace frock of Olivia for the Shakespeare's Globe Theatre production of "Twelfth Night," the actor glides across the stage in a hoop-skirt-assisted moon walk, takes shallow little breaths, then falls in love across the gender divide and back again. It's a performance that's altogether more transgender than transvestite.
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NEWS
September 4, 2003 | Joe Rhodes, Special to The Times
He's always been a scary guy, that William Shakespeare, partly because of his enormous forehead, but mostly because of all those plays he wrote, you know, the ones with the big words and long trance-inducing Elizabethan speeches that you can't understand, but the English teacher asks you questions about them anyway, which, as required by federal law, goes on your permanent record. But, buck up, Bardophobes. You need cower in fear no longer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2003 | Reuters
Oscar-winner Gwyneth Paltrow and British actor Joseph Fiennes will re-create the famous "Romeo and Juliet" balcony scene for Prince Charles at a charity show, organizers said Thursday. The co-stars of the 1998 film "Shakespeare in Love" will play the star-crossed lovers for the heir to the throne. Among other actors performing selected Shakespeare scenes at the replica of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in London on Monday will be Paul Scofield, Diana Rigg and Jane Lapotaire.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2003 | Jeff Barnard, Associated Press
In a small theater anteroom, enclosed in a custom-built case and watched over by surveillance video and electronic alarm, lies a relic that connects the Oregon Shakespeare Festival through time almost to the bard himself. Formally titled "Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2003 | David Gritten, Special to The Times London
"Men of few words are the best men."-- from "Henry V" Act 3, Scene 2 Coming from William Shakespeare, it's a pretty ironic comment, given that he wrote hundreds of thousands of words himself -- in poems and in 38 plays. But what words. Words that resonate down the ages more than four centuries later. Words that read brilliantly on the page but are shown to their best advantage when spoken. And this is where "The Complete Arkangel Shakespeare" comes in.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2003 | Barbara Isenberg, Special to The Times
Things are not going well for the Countess of Salisbury. She has finally managed to turn away a rowdy group of Scots, led by their king, when the lustful king of England, Edward III, comes 'round the castle. Never mind that her husband is out defending king and country. Declares Edward: "I must enjoy her." So goes "Edward III," a historical drama not accepted into the Shakespeare canon until the 1990s and now being performed on London's West End by the Royal Shakespeare Company.
NEWS
January 2, 2003 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
Now that the Big Foot mystery has finally been cleared up, we can turn our attention to that other controversial giant: William Shakespeare. Did the Bard write "Othello," "Hamlet" and dozens of other masterworks, or was he the biggest fraud in literary history? That is the question producer-host Michael Rubbo poses in "Much Ado About Something," a 90-minute episode of the PBS show "Frontline" (9 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dawn Akemi was bent on gluttony of Falstaffian proportions. No, the lithe actress with the long brown hair wasn't starving for a joint of venison and a tankard of ale, the sort of fare favored by Shakespeare's fat knight. She had gone backstage at the MET Theatre in Hollywood because she craved more of the Bard's words--more than any sane mortal would ever want to chew. She had not been this way 12 hours before.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2002
Charles Hamilton, the late Shakespearean scholar, created a storm of controversy when he seized on an anonymous document at the British Museum Library and proclaimed it a long-lost work by William Shakespeare. By Hamilton's reckoning, the play, loosely based on Cervantes' "Don Quixote," was the apocryphal "Cardenio," a lost masterpiece supposedly co-written by Shakespeare and his associate John Fletcher around 1612.
NEWS
July 4, 2002 | HILLARY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Four hundred years ago, they were called "groundlings": those who paid a penny to sit or stand on the bare patch of ground around the stage in open-air theaters like the Globe, where William Shakespeare's works were first performed. The groundlings cheered and jeered, throwing fruit when displeased and hooting at every risque line, providing a solid laugh track for the amusement of the better-heeled patrons in the upper galleries.
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