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William Shakespeare

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2001 | LIZ F. KAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year and a half ago, 12-year-old Nicole Jackson didn't know much about William Shakespeare. "I knew nothing except that two or three of his plays had been made into movies," said the eighth-grader at Haydock Intermediate School in Oxnard. Since starting a Shakespeare class offered by City Hearts: Kids Say Yes to the Arts, Nicole said she has found out a lot about life in the Elizabethan playwright's time, including sword fighting.
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NEWS
October 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Archeologists excavating the ruins of Shakespeare's Rose Theater in London said they may have discovered remains of the entire estate that surrounded the 16th century playhouse. The first remains of the theater--where the English bard learned his craft and where many of his early plays were performed--were discovered in 1989.
TRAVEL
September 16, 2001
A unique attempt to re-create London's long-ago Blackfriars theater, where the works of William Shakespeare and other playwrights played in Elizabethan times, is to open Friday in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. (At the Travel section's press time Tuesday, after the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, D.C., the opening was still on schedule.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
In the nicest way, Amy Freed's sparkling new comedy "The Beard of Avon" is the "JFK" of its chosen milieu: Elizabethan England in the time of William Shakespeare. Freed answers her central question--"Who wrote Shakespeare's plays?"--by opening an overstuffed rucksack of conspiracy theories.
NEWS
June 1, 2001 | TIM RUTTEN, TIMES CULTURE CORRESPONDENT
James Joyce, first among modernist equals, found his influence so all-encompassing that he habitually referred to him as "Shakesphere." Ralph Waldo Emerson, philosopher and man of letters, assessed him as "inconceivably wise," while all other writers--whatever their genius--were merely "conceivably so." But to Sir Frank Kermode, perhaps this era's preeminent Shakespeare reader, the poet and playwright was "always, indeed, a writer and to be considered as such."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2001 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three hundred and eighty-five years after William Shakespeare's death, his plays and poems remain elegant cryptograms for high school students to decipher. But for Vanessa Herman, a senior at Birmingham High in Van Nuys, Shakespeare's writings are a ticket to New York City and--if all ends well--to England. As Los Angeles' delegate to the English-Speaking Union's national Shakespeare competition, Herman can't afford to study the Bard like your average high school senior.
NEWS
March 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Several 17th century clay pipes found on the site of William Shakespeare's home may have been used to smoke marijuana, scientists said. The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust in Stratford-on-Avon in England allowed South African researchers in Pretoria to analyze 24 pipe fragments. Eight of the fragments showed evidence of marijuana, and two also showed evidence of cocaine, the scientists said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2001 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
"Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more." So goes the cry with which Shakespeare's King Henry V, the hawkish Harry, pumps up his men to charge forth into battle. And so might a similar exhortation resound through the rehearsal halls of the Music Center these days. There too a leader has been readying his troupes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2000 | OFELIA CASILLAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
'And what are the three words that set the scene?" teacher Rafe Esquith asked his class in a discussion about "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain. "Huck says, 'They're after us.' He says 'us' because there's a connection between Huck and Jim." But what connection, Esquith asked as he paced around the crammed classroom on Monday morning, his students attentive with raised hands and eager eyes. One answered: "Jim took care of Huck. Jim saved him from the storm."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2000 | PHILIP BRANDES
There's something familiar about William Shakespeare battling writer's block to complete a play on which the survival of his theater company depends. Not to mention confronting the chauvinistic Elizabethan convention that barred women from the stage. Unfortunately, it's a little too familiar.
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