Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWilliam Shakespeare
IN THE NEWS

William Shakespeare

NEWS
January 2, 2003 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
Now that the Big Foot mystery has finally been cleared up, we can turn our attention to that other controversial giant: William Shakespeare. Did the Bard write "Othello," "Hamlet" and dozens of other masterworks, or was he the biggest fraud in literary history? That is the question producer-host Michael Rubbo poses in "Much Ado About Something," a 90-minute episode of the PBS show "Frontline" (9 p.m.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dawn Akemi was bent on gluttony of Falstaffian proportions. No, the lithe actress with the long brown hair wasn't starving for a joint of venison and a tankard of ale, the sort of fare favored by Shakespeare's fat knight. She had gone backstage at the MET Theatre in Hollywood because she craved more of the Bard's words--more than any sane mortal would ever want to chew. She had not been this way 12 hours before.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2002
Charles Hamilton, the late Shakespearean scholar, created a storm of controversy when he seized on an anonymous document at the British Museum Library and proclaimed it a long-lost work by William Shakespeare. By Hamilton's reckoning, the play, loosely based on Cervantes' "Don Quixote," was the apocryphal "Cardenio," a lost masterpiece supposedly co-written by Shakespeare and his associate John Fletcher around 1612.
NEWS
July 4, 2002 | HILLARY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Four hundred years ago, they were called "groundlings": those who paid a penny to sit or stand on the bare patch of ground around the stage in open-air theaters like the Globe, where William Shakespeare's works were first performed. The groundlings cheered and jeered, throwing fruit when displeased and hooting at every risque line, providing a solid laugh track for the amusement of the better-heeled patrons in the upper galleries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2001 | LIZ F. KAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year and a half ago, 12-year-old Nicole Jackson didn't know much about William Shakespeare. "I knew nothing except that two or three of his plays had been made into movies," said the eighth-grader at Haydock Intermediate School in Oxnard. Since starting a Shakespeare class offered by City Hearts: Kids Say Yes to the Arts, Nicole said she has found out a lot about life in the Elizabethan playwright's time, including sword fighting.
NEWS
October 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Archeologists excavating the ruins of Shakespeare's Rose Theater in London said they may have discovered remains of the entire estate that surrounded the 16th century playhouse. The first remains of the theater--where the English bard learned his craft and where many of his early plays were performed--were discovered in 1989.
TRAVEL
September 16, 2001
A unique attempt to re-create London's long-ago Blackfriars theater, where the works of William Shakespeare and other playwrights played in Elizabethan times, is to open Friday in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. (At the Travel section's press time Tuesday, after the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, D.C., the opening was still on schedule.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
In the nicest way, Amy Freed's sparkling new comedy "The Beard of Avon" is the "JFK" of its chosen milieu: Elizabethan England in the time of William Shakespeare. Freed answers her central question--"Who wrote Shakespeare's plays?"--by opening an overstuffed rucksack of conspiracy theories.
NEWS
June 1, 2001 | TIM RUTTEN, TIMES CULTURE CORRESPONDENT
James Joyce, first among modernist equals, found his influence so all-encompassing that he habitually referred to him as "Shakesphere." Ralph Waldo Emerson, philosopher and man of letters, assessed him as "inconceivably wise," while all other writers--whatever their genius--were merely "conceivably so." But to Sir Frank Kermode, perhaps this era's preeminent Shakespeare reader, the poet and playwright was "always, indeed, a writer and to be considered as such."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2001 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three hundred and eighty-five years after William Shakespeare's death, his plays and poems remain elegant cryptograms for high school students to decipher. But for Vanessa Herman, a senior at Birmingham High in Van Nuys, Shakespeare's writings are a ticket to New York City and--if all ends well--to England. As Los Angeles' delegate to the English-Speaking Union's national Shakespeare competition, Herman can't afford to study the Bard like your average high school senior.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|