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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1987
The Case of Baby M is not a contract case. This is a custody case where the court's concern should be for the child. The mother is Mary Beth Whitehead. The father is William Stern. The issue is what arrangement for parenting between father and mother will best serve the child. JAMES H. EGLY Laguna Beach
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, Times Television Critic
"Baby M" is never anything less than excellent. ABC's two-part drama (9-11 p.m. Sunday and Monday on Channels 7, 3, 10 and 42) is a big, agonizing wallop of a story, reliving with stirring, wrenching intensity the historic, headlined custody battle between surrogate mother Mary Beth Whitehead and William and Elizabeth Stern.
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NEWS
March 29, 1988
William Stern testified that Baby M should be kept from her biological mother for several years to protect the child from emotional harm and exploitation. Stern, testifying for 2 1/2 hours at a custody hearing in Hackensack, N.J., characterized surrogate mother Mary Beth Whitehead-Gould as capable of undermining his relationship with the child, legally known as Melissa Stern. The hearing was ordered by the New Jersey Supreme Court in its landmark Feb.
NEWS
March 29, 1988
William Stern testified that Baby M should be kept from her biological mother for several years to protect the child from emotional harm and exploitation. Stern, testifying for 2 1/2 hours at a custody hearing in Hackensack, N.J., characterized surrogate mother Mary Beth Whitehead-Gould as capable of undermining his relationship with the child, legally known as Melissa Stern. The hearing was ordered by the New Jersey Supreme Court in its landmark Feb.
NEWS
February 11, 1987 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
Four weeks into a trial its principals say they never wanted in the first place, the complicated question of custody of a child conceived by artificial insemination is focusing sharply on the emotional stability of the three people vying to be her parents. Now a chubby 11-month-old with sandy hair and cheerful blue eyes, the infant is called Melissa by biochemist William Stern and his pediatrician wife Dr. Elizabeth Stern. They are the Tenafly, N.J.
NEWS
February 5, 1987 | Associated Press
A distraught surrogate mother, facing loss of the baby she agreed to bear for $10,000, threatened to kill herself and the child rather than give her up, according to a tape recording played in court Wednesday. The cries of the infant, known in court as Baby M, were in the background as Mary Beth Whitehead pleaded for forgiveness for changing her mind about the contract, under which she agreed to be artificially inseminated with William Stern's sperm and bear his child.
NEWS
April 11, 1987 | Associated Press
The New Jersey Supreme Court on Friday reinstated surrogate mother Mary Beth Whitehead's right to visit the daughter she bore under a $10,000 contract. The 6-1 ruling was issued 10 days after a lower court judge took away the 30-year-old homemaker's parental rights and granted custody of the year-old girl to William Stern, the biological father. The Supreme Court refused to stay Superior Court Judge Harvey R.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, Times Television Critic
"Baby M" is never anything less than excellent. ABC's two-part drama (9-11 p.m. Sunday and Monday on Channels 7, 3, 10 and 42) is a big, agonizing wallop of a story, reliving with stirring, wrenching intensity the historic, headlined custody battle between surrogate mother Mary Beth Whitehead and William and Elizabeth Stern.
NEWS
February 12, 1987 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
The courtroom is tiny, with just 14 of the 56 seats set aside for spectators at a trial that has sparked interest around the world. So the line here at Bergen County Superior Court begins forming early, usually by about 6:30 a.m., for the chance to sit in on the precedent-setting case of a surrogate mother who reneged on her contract to give up the baby she bore for a couple who could not have children of their own.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | ELIZABETH MEHREN and BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writers
A state judge awarded full custody of Baby M to her father Tuesday, stripping the surrogate mother of all legal parental rights in the emotional landmark custody case. Ruling that the surrogacy contract was "valid and enforceable," Superior Court Judge Harvey R. Sorkow arranged for the father's wife immediately to adopt the healthy, blue-eyed, 1-year-old infant in his chambers.
NEWS
April 11, 1987 | Associated Press
The New Jersey Supreme Court on Friday reinstated surrogate mother Mary Beth Whitehead's right to visit the daughter she bore under a $10,000 contract. The 6-1 ruling was issued 10 days after a lower court judge took away the 30-year-old homemaker's parental rights and granted custody of the year-old girl to William Stern, the biological father. The Supreme Court refused to stay Superior Court Judge Harvey R.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | ELIZABETH MEHREN and BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writers
A state judge awarded full custody of Baby M to her father Tuesday, stripping the surrogate mother of all legal parental rights in the emotional landmark custody case. Ruling that the surrogacy contract was "valid and enforceable," Superior Court Judge Harvey R. Sorkow arranged for the father's wife immediately to adopt the healthy, blue-eyed, 1-year-old infant in his chambers.
NEWS
February 12, 1987 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
The courtroom is tiny, with just 14 of the 56 seats set aside for spectators at a trial that has sparked interest around the world. So the line here at Bergen County Superior Court begins forming early, usually by about 6:30 a.m., for the chance to sit in on the precedent-setting case of a surrogate mother who reneged on her contract to give up the baby she bore for a couple who could not have children of their own.
NEWS
February 11, 1987 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
Four weeks into a trial its principals say they never wanted in the first place, the complicated question of custody of a child conceived by artificial insemination is focusing sharply on the emotional stability of the three people vying to be her parents. Now a chubby 11-month-old with sandy hair and cheerful blue eyes, the infant is called Melissa by biochemist William Stern and his pediatrician wife Dr. Elizabeth Stern. They are the Tenafly, N.J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1987
The Case of Baby M is not a contract case. This is a custody case where the court's concern should be for the child. The mother is Mary Beth Whitehead. The father is William Stern. The issue is what arrangement for parenting between father and mother will best serve the child. JAMES H. EGLY Laguna Beach
NEWS
February 5, 1987 | Associated Press
A distraught surrogate mother, facing loss of the baby she agreed to bear for $10,000, threatened to kill herself and the child rather than give her up, according to a tape recording played in court Wednesday. The cries of the infant, known in court as Baby M, were in the background as Mary Beth Whitehead pleaded for forgiveness for changing her mind about the contract, under which she agreed to be artificially inseminated with William Stern's sperm and bear his child.
NEWS
March 6, 1989 | DONALD P. MYERS, Newsday
Mary Beth Whitehead-Gould, four months pregnant with her fifth child, throws up in the bathroom as the sun goes down. "Morning sickness, day and night, with all my babies," she says when she's finished. "It's a cross I have to bear." Her fourth child, 9-month-old Austin, crawls on the kitchen floor with the Shetland sheep dogs. Her first child, 14-year-old Ryan, skateboards in the street outside.
NEWS
April 8, 1987
The New Jersey Supreme Court agreed to hear surrogate mother Mary Beth Whitehead's appeal of the ruling that stripped her of all parental rights to the daughter she bore under a $10,000 contract. By deciding to take up the Baby M case directly, the state's highest court is allowing Whitehead to bypass the Appellate Division of Superior Court. The court also agreed to consider her lawyer's request for a stay of the March 31 decision by Superior Court Judge Harvey R.
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